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the 



Maryland 



magazine 



Volume XXX • Number 1 
November-December • 1958 



Alumni Publication of the 



University of Maryland 




In This Issue: 



Maryland 6 Rare Hook Boom 
University > Marylanl Ll^ 
College Park. Mr. 






Academic Standards: The Real Story 
Fund Monies Apportioned to Projects 
Introducing the Regents 
Maryland and the Pioneer Telegraph 



, 



A NEW SITE FOR SAVERS 



Right in the 
heart of the 




TVM 



RSTNEDERAL 

inVVashington 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN 
ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 



610 13th Street. N.W., Washington 5, D. C. 
Dl. 7-2370 



Bethesda Branch: 8216 Wisconsin Avenue 
OL. 6-3923 



Maryland 




( 01 ER Our cover photograph, showing students intent upon their 
studies, provides the theme for the major article oi this issue o) Maryland 
The article is titled, "Academic Standards: The Heal Story" and appears 
beginning on page five. 

PHOTOGRAPH in \l DANEGGER, III AD. PHOTOGRAPHK LABORATORY. 



the 



Maryland 



Volume XXX 



magazine 

Number 1 



NOVEMBER— DECEMBER • 1958 



Alumni Publication of 

the University of Maryland 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
EDMUND S. BURKE, Assistant Treasurer 
ALVIN L. AUBINOE 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
ENOS S. STOCKBRIDGE 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 

C. EWING TUTTLE 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

FRANK BLOCK, '24, President 

BARRY A. BOSWELL, JR., '42, Vice-President 

MRS. GERALDINE P. EDWARDS, '31, Vice-President 

DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 

ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 

OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 
Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018) (FE 7-2113) 











In This Issue — 


FEATURES 








2 


The Alumni Diary 






3 


Campus Notes 






5 


Academic Standards: The Real Story 






13 


Fund Monies Apportioned to Projects; 


Law Alumni Join Forces with Fund 




14 


Introducing the Regents 






16 


Maryland and the Pioneer Telegraph 






18 


News From the Clubs 






19 


University Sports 




NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS 


AND COLLEGES 








24 


Agriculture 






26 


Arts and Sciences 






28 


Business and Public Administration 






29 


Dentistry 






31 


Education 






38 


Engineering 






40 


Home Economics 




41 


Law 






41 


Medicine 






45 


Nursing 






46 


Pharmacy 






52 


Special and Continuation Studies 





59 
61 

64 



Social Notes 
Completed Careers 



Directory of Advertisers 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md., as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. — $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Member of American Alumni Council. 



1 111 Glneral Alumni Council 

Si HOOl I Ml ( (II 1 I (.) 
HI flit SI \ I All\ I s 

40 ■ it i : 11 k i 

\iUhii B. Hamilton, '29 
( layton Reynolds, '22 
rheodore I . Bissell, '20 

kITsASCIBNCBl 

W. Gilbert Dent,, Jr., '26 
Ralph (.. Shure, '32 

( hallos R. Merrick, '26 

»i mm sv A I' i ii i I ( ADMINISTRATION 

ll.ury A. Boswell, Jr., '42 
Alvin s Klein, '37 
Egbert F. Tingley, '27 

111 S I I S I H 1 

Dr. Samuel Bryant, '32 
Dr. Eugene I). Lyon, '38 
Dr. Edwin G. Gail, '18 

EDUI \ I 1 ( i N 

Mrs. John J. Hoyert, Jr., '50 
Judson Bell, '41 
llan> Hasslinger, '33 

ENGINEERING 

Emmetl Loane, '29 
Robert M. Rivello, '43 
Arthur G. VanReuth, '34 

ROME icon OMK s 

Mrs. Miriam Beall, '31 

Mrs. Geraldine P. Edwards, '31 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt-Kricker, '31 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Benjamin B. Rosenstock, '25 
Layman J. Redden, '34 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, Tl 

NURSING 

Mrs. Evelyn Koontz Musavi, '53 
Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, '50 
Mrs. Norma Fuller Yeager, '48 

PHARMACY 

Frank Block, '24 
Norman J. Levin, '38 
Gordon Mouat, '37 



ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore — Charles P. Ellinger, '37 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cumberland — H. Reford Aldridge. '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '2 1 
Frederick County — 

James F. Zimmerman. '37 
"M" Club — George Knepley. '39 
New England — George Kerlejza, '25 
New York— Harold McGay, '50 
Overseas — Col. Edward J. Fletcher, '37 
Pittsburgh— Dr. Joseph Finegold, '34 
Prince Georges — Thomas R. Brooks. '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, '26 



EX-OF1 K to MEMBERS 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 

David L. Brigham. '38 
Secretary-Treasurer 
loseph H. Deckman, '31, Past President 

J. Gilbert Prendergast. '33. Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg. '18. Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10. Past President 
Dr. Albeit I Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer. 17. Past President 
C. V. Koons. '2 l >. Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell. '19. Past President 




THE ALUMNI DIARY 



Dear Fellow Alumni: 

We cross two great holiday periods with this issue of Maryland. Briefly, we pause 
on Thanksgiving to review- the many blessings which are ours as a Nation, a 
people and as individuals. Almost before we catch our breath the Christmas 
season is at hand and it becomes time to look to all who are around us with 
most hearty wishes and an expression that the days to come may be as intensely 
bright as the light which shone over the manger of Bethlehem. May we be among 
the first to wish for our Alumni, our University family and all dear to them, the 
most complete Christmas and New Year each has ever known. 

Fresh upon our minds at the moment is the passing of two of our most faithful. 
Called to the other shore are Arthur Ahalt. who gave so much to the Agricultural 
Alumni and to the College of Agriculture, and Clifton E. "Uncle Tippy" Fuller. 
We recall a goodly portion of the stretch between 1934 and 1958 when "Uncle 
Tippy" did not miss a Homecoming. Both knew the full meaning of loyalty and 
devotion to their University and both will be missed. 

It was Thoreau who said, "In the long run, men hit only that at which they 
aim; therefore they had better aim high." Another said "Tomorrow is not for 
the timid or the tired." Perhaps this is why a recent letter from a 1957 graduate 
serves as the theme of our brief visit in this issue. The note read, "Many thanks 
for sending me notice of the membership dues. The Maryland Magazine has 
helped me watch the University grow. It is a privilege to be a member!" How 
many feel this way? How many take time to say it? 

Perhaps the voice of this young alumnus envisions future accomplishments of 
which we now only dare dream. Little did he realize the inspiration in his words. 
Of course, he did not know that in the last three months more than one thousand 
dues-paying and active alumni were added to the rolls. Nor did he have any 
way of knowing that alumni had been responsible for raising a goodly part of 
more than $100,000 for the Baltimore Union-Dormitory. Scholarships, a Heritage 
Fund and the University Library. 

Do you suppose he knew of steps to organize more alumni clubs? This is hardly 
possible since only a handful of our fellow alumni are in his area of the countr\. 
Possibly, he has a loyalty remaining from student days. But. he said. "It is a 
privilege to be a member of the Alumni Association!" This means our organiza- 
tion, our group, our common interest. The challenge has not come to one or two. 
It is not alone to the officers of the Alumni Association, the members of the 
Alumni Council, the various School Association Boards and committees, or even 
to the officers and members of Alumni Clubs. Every alumnus will want to have a 
hand in the building to the point where he can say. because he has earned that 
right through active interest and participation. "This is my Alumni Association. 
It is a privilege to be a member." 

You can see Thanksgiving was happy for us. Christmas will be MERRY for 
you . . . and the NEW YEAR. . . . Yes. the NEW YEAR will be great as we 
grow, serve and plan in the generous heritage of the past for the brighter, fuller 
and hopeful tomorrow. It is ours! 

As ever, 




/ ^V< . 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



CAMPUS NOTES 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



NOVEMBER 

24 7th Session — Space Research 
and Technology Institute — 
'"Astronomy in Near Space." 
26 Thanksgiving Recess begins 
after last class. 
DECEMBER 

1 8th Session — Space Research 

and Technology Institute — 
"Space Medicine, Astrobiol- 

ogy." 

1 Thanksgiving Recess ends. 

4 Harmony Hall. 



5-6 "Oedipus Rex" — Student 

Union. 
5-15 U. T. Production — "Born 

Yesterday." 
9 Concert, University Orchestra. 

20 Christmas Recess begins after 
last class. 

JANUARY 

5 Christmas Recess ends. 

16-17 Music Department Opera. 

21 Pre-Examination Study Day. 
22-28 First Semester examinations. 



FEBRUARY 

1-5 Registration, Spring Semester. 
8 Classes begin. 
22 Washington's Birthday, holi- 
day. 

24 The National Symphony Or- 
chestra with the Little Gaelic 
Singers — Cole Activities 
Building. 

28 University of Maryland's Cap- 

itol Hill Debate Tournament. 
MARCH 

25 Maryland Day. 



PROF. HAMILTON FRATERNITY 
PRESIDENT 

Arthur B. Hamilton, of University 
Park, has been elected National Presi- 
dent of Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity 
at its convention in the Princess Issena 
Hotel, Daytona Beach on August 23. 

The new President, a Professor of 
Agricultural Economics at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, holds a B.S. and 
an M. S. degree from the University. 

The author of innumerable publica- 
tions on Maryland agricultural condi- 
tions. Hamilton is an honorary mem- 
ber of Alpha Zeta, agricultural honor- 
ary fraternity, and the Future Farmers 
of America. He is also President of 
the National Council on Education 
and a member of the American Farm 
Economics Association, the American 
Association of Farm Managers and 
Appraisers, the Danforth Foundation, 
and the Maryland State Grange. 

From a charter member of the Alpha 
Theta Chapter of Alpha Gamma Rho 



in 1927 to National President of 
18,000 members and chapters in 35 
states, Hamilton has served his fra- 
ternity in many capacities, including 
chapter advisor of his local chapter and 
national First Vice-President. 



DANFORTH FELLOWSHIP ANNOUNCED 

Dr. Paul Poffenberger, Assistant to the 
Dean. College of Agriculture and 
Director of the Office of Scholarships 
and Grants-in-aid, has been appointed 
to nominate candidates for 1959 Dan- 
forth Graduate Fellowships. Dr. Poff- 
enberger will nominate two (or not to 
exceed three) candidates from senior 
college men and recent graduates who 
are preparing themselves for a career 
of college teaching and who are 
planning to enter graduate school in 
September, 1959 for their first year of 
graduate study. 

Danforth appointments are funda- 
mentally "a relationship of encourage- 



ment" throughout the years of gradu- 
ate study, carrying a promise of 
financial aid within prescribed condi- 
tions as there may be need. The maxi- 
mum annual grant for single Fellows 
is $1,400 plus tuition and fees charged 
to all graduate students; for married 
Fellows, $1,900 plus tuition and fees 
charged to all graduate students with 
an additional stipend of $350 for each 
child. Students with or without finan- 
cial need are invited to apply. 

The qualifications of the candidates 
as listed in the announcement from 
the Danforth Foundation are: men of 
outstanding academic ability, personal- 
ity congenial to the classroom, and 
integrity and character. including 
serious inquiry within the Christian 
tradition. 

All applications, including the recom- 
mendations, must be completed by 
January 31, 1959. Any student wish- 
ing further information should get in 
touch with Dr. Poffenberger. 

(Continued on next page) 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1958 



c ampus Notes 

Continued from page 3 



DR. SI MONS M Kl SS] S ( onsi RVATION 

Presiding over the planning meeting of 
the State Committee on Maryland 
Land Week was Dr. I. B, Symons ol 
the University's Board ot Regents. 
Land Week this year was October 
5-11. 

Dr. Symons stated. "Conservation of 
our natural resources is the highest 
unselfish service an individual can 
render to this and future generations." 

Activities ol Maryland Land Week 
stressed the need for reflection on 
where our food and water comes from. 
Both farm and city people need to 
understand the necessity of conserving 
and maintaining adequate supplies of 
food and water for a growing popula- 
tion. Industry needs large supplies of 
water and agriculture is beginning to 
use larger amounts in irrigation. 

DR. VAN ROYEN APPOINTED TO ARMY 
SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY PANEL 

Dr. William Van Royen. Professor and 
Chairman of the Department of 
Geography, has been appointed to 
membership on the Army Scientific 
Advisory Panel by Secretary of the 
Army Wilbur M. Brucker. 

Dr. Van Royen has previously been 
connected with the office of the 
Quartermaster General, was senior 
staff member of the Operations Re- 
search Office of the Army, and was 
attached to the Eighth Army in Korea 
as Operations Research Officer. 

In addition to his association with 
the University of Maryland, he serves 
as consultant of the Operations Re- 
search Office, and serves as a member 
of the publications review board. 

riMELY INSTITUTE FOR AREA SCIENTISTS 

One of today's most important and 
timely subjects is being discussed in the 
first annual "Space Research and 
Technology Institute." sponsored by 
the College of Arts and Sciences, the 
College of Engineering, and the College 
of Special and Continuation Studies ol 
the University ol Maryland. 

More than 5()() military and scientific 
specialists m the area are attending the 
eight sessions held on the campus at 
College Park from October through 
December. Nationally and interna- 




Approximately 100 persons representing former students, faculty numbers and friends 
recently honored Dr. Nathan L. Drake, Professor and Head of the Department of 
Chemistry, at the Sheraton Hotel, Washington. Dr. Drake was presented with a bound 
volume of congratulatory letters from former students and a set of golf clubs. Left to 
right: E. Young, Ph.D., ' 1943: J. Lann, Ph.D.. 1941: W. Stanton. Ph.D., 1941: L. Smith, 
Ph.D., 1941: H. Carhart, Ph.D., 1939. II Frosh, Ph.D.. 1941: Mrs. Drake: Dr. Drake; 
F. Veitch, Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D.. 1935: S. McFarlund, B.S., 1939; J. Spies. Ph.D., 
1934: G. Cooke, Ph.D., 1929; J. Wolfe. Ph.D.. 1939. 



tionally known scientists in space re- 
search and technology will lecture at 
each of the eight sessions. 

The Institute is designed to provide 
opportunities for scientists and techni- 
cians in military, governmental and in- 
dustrial agencies in the Washington 
area to meet and hear some of the 
outstanding authorities in the various 
fields of space research and technology. 
These experts will present the latest 
developments in such areas as Astron- 
omy. Space Flight. Satellites, and Space 
Medicine. 

Among the distinguished lecturers 
are Kraft A. Ehricke. Technical 
Assistant to the Chief Engineer. Con- 
vair-Astronautics. San Diego. Cali- 
fornia, who will speak on "Interplane- 
tary Flight Objectives and Methods;" 
Dr. Howard S. Seifert. Staff Engineer. 
Space Technology Laboratories, the 
Ramo-Wooldridge Corporation. Los 
Angeles. California, who will speak on 
"Chemical. Nuclear. Ionic Propulsion:" 
Dr. Arthur Kantrowitz. Director of the 
AVCO Research Laboratory, Everett, 
Mass.. who will review some o\ the 
problems of "Manned Space Flight:" 
Dr. Herbert F. York. Chief Scientist, 
Advanced Research Projects Agency . 
Washington. D.C., who will outline the 
presently planned U.S. Space Program: 
Dr. John P. Hagen. Director of Project 
Vanguard, L'.S. Naval Research Lab- 
oratory, Washington. D.C., who will 
review the results of information de- 
rived from satellites that are now in 



space: Dr. Ernest J. Opik. Visiting 
Professor in Astrophysics. University 
of Maryland, who will delve into some 
of the astronomical problems in near I 
space: and Dr. Hubertus Strughold, 
Advisor for Research. School of Avia- 
tion Medicine. Randolph Air Force 
Base. Texas, who will discuss "Space 
Medicine and Astrobiology." 

SUMMIT DIPLOMACY STUDY 

An analysis of the personal role of the 
President of the United States in deal- 
ing with foreign countries at the sum- 
mit was recently completed by Protcs- 
sor Elmer Plischke. Chairman of the 
Department of Government and 
Politics. 

The 125-page study, entitled Summit 
Diplomacy: Personal Diplomacy of 
the President of the United States. 
deals with the Presidents personal 
communications with foreign leaders, 
state visits, and his participation in 
summit conferences. In addition to 
describing the historical development 
of those elements of diplomacy, it 
assesses their significance and effective- 
ness in mid-twentieth century foreign 
relations. 

"Contemporar\ technological facili- 
ties render it possible if not convenient 
for the President to engage in presi- 
dential negotiation whenever he deems 
it to be appropriate." Dr. Plischke said. 

"Its advantages, augmented by the 
(Continued on page 20) 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 







'It is my hope that ... we can develop 



over a period of time 



a tradition of scholarship 



on the campus of the University 



Dr. Elkins answers questions concerning new academic standards 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1958 



NEXT PAGE 

5 




ACADEMIC STANDARDS: THE REAL STORY 



A candid interview between Dr. Elkins and Vernon M. Briggs. Jr.. President of the Student 
Government Association, concerning the University's new academic standards, reveals that: 
I ) the plan has faculty, student and press support: 2) the I niversity has standards that are 
realistic but reasonable, and is receiving increasing recognition of its academic stature: and 
3) the athletic program has six ftlantic Coast Conference championships to its credit after one 
year of the plan s operation, and has every chance for developing a strong, sound program of 
continuing success in athletics within the normal expectancy of wins and losses in any sport. 

6 THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




(/ I I SI |()\ 



Q 



uestion: 



Q 



uestion: 



Briefly, Dr. Elkins, what i* the present admissions policy of 
the I niversitj '■ 

Answer: The University, like mosl state institutions. has a 
/l very liberal admissions policy. Foi out-of-state students, we 
require a "('" average on the basis of "A", "B", *'('". "D". and 
for all practical purposes most of them who come in have to have 
a "B" average because of housing accommodations and the limita- 
tions on that. lor the in-state Maryland resident, any high school 
graduate who has the quantitative requirements— that is. the sub- 
jects that wc require — can get in to the University. If that student 
has below a "C" average, we require him to take a test and it he 
passes the test satisfactorily, he is admitted as a regular student. 
If not, he is admitted as an "on-trial" student. The "on-trial" stu- 
dents, especially those who are in the lowest category, are urged 
not to come to the University. If they do come, we require their 
parents to write us a statement that they want the student to enter 
the University, regardless of our advice to the contrary. In that 
event, he is admitted "on trial," and must make a 1.5 average the 
first year or be dismissed. 
That in essence is our admissions policy. 



Why does the University admit students who are on trial? 

A nswer: We have not given this problem a great deal of 
/\ attention until the last year or two. In some states there are 
laws which require all state high school graduates to be admitted 
to the university. Here that is not true. We are required to admit 
only those who are certified by the high schools, but, in effect, we 
have been admitting all of them. We are not ready, at the present 
time, to decide upon a cut-off score. In other words, we don't 
know exactly how to eliminate a group of students who are prob- 
ably not eligible. We're getting additional information, but we felt 
that the first thing that we should do was to establish requirements 
for students that would be reasonable, and then perhaps move in 
the direction of a selective admissions policy. 



Do these "on-trial" students, as a group, show up heavily in 
the flunk-out statisties at the end of the semester? 

A nswer: Yes, they show up heavily, but they are not the 
j~L only ones and there are a number of "on-trial" students who 
do make the grade. Now, I am sure, without having statistical 
evidence before me, that there is a much higher percentage of "on- 
trial" students who flunk out than students who are not on trial. 

(Continued on next page) 




Q 



\ 




Q 



Q 



Q 



uestion: Is the Hunk-out group each semester composed mainly of 
first-year students? 

A nswer: The highest percentage are first-year students. 11 
/l I recall correctly, about 40 percent of our fail-out students 
this past year were first-year students. 



uestion: \\ hat is the purpose of the iww Probation Plan? 

a NSWER: The purpose of the new Probation Plan is not to 
/I eliminate students. We are not interested in eliminating 
students. We are interested in maintaining standards that will 
enable us to have a first-class educational program, and enable us, 
at a time when we are getting more and more high school gradu- 
ates coming in to college, to set up standards and maintain them, 
that the faculty who do the teaching may require a reasonable 
performance on the part of students. 



UESTION: Will you outline briefly its principal points? 

A nswer: It has a number of points. The real purpose is to 
/l require the student to proceed toward a degree in a normal 
manner. We give some consideration — a good deal — to a fresh- 
man. We do not require him to have a 2.0 average, or a "C 
average, at the end of the first semester or the end of the first 
year. As a matter of fact, if he passes one course, he may stay on 
after the first semester and be on probation the second semester — 
that is. if he did not make a 1.5 average. And if he does not pass 
more than 35 percent of his work we put him on probation. But 
at the end of the first year, the student is expected to have attained 
a 1 .5 average. This is between a "C" and a '"D"\ as you know — 
midway between. And if he has not attained that by the end of 
the first year he is placed on probation, and then he must make a 
1.75 to get off. But if he makes a 1.5. he may stay in school 
another semester. At the end of his fourth term, or his fifth term, 
we expect the student to have attained a 2.0 or "C" average and 
attain junior standing. This is what is required of graduation and 
in order for him to take upper level classes he must have this "C" 
average. 



UESTION: Dr. Elking, you state that the key point of this plan is that 
a student must make normal and satisfactory progress to- 
ward graduation by attaining junior standing by the end of 
his fourth or at latest his fifth semester and must then main- 
tain a 2.0. or "{]" average to receive his diploma at the end 
of four additional semesters. What happens to the student 
who fails to do this? 

A nswer: Generally it's the end of the fifth semester that 
Yl he has to have the "C" average. Now if he doesn't have the 
"C" average, he is placed on probation for a semester. If he 
doesn't attain it. in his probation semester, he is dismissed from 
the University academically. If it is his first dismissal, it is the 
general policy of the Petitions Board to re-admit him after he has 
been out of the University for one semester unless he has a very, 
very poor record. And then if he is re-admitted on probation and 
if he does not make the "C" average by the end of another term 
he is dismissed from the University for good. I would like to say 
one thing at this point — in connection with this. 

We discourage people from coming to the University if we 
feel they cannot do college work. We feel it is better for those 
people to go somewhere else and do preparatory work for a 
while — additional preparatory work — rather than to come here 
without a good chance of remaining. It's better for the student 
to find out first whether he can do universit\ work before coming 
here, because we do not think it is good for any student to come 
here and fail out. 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Q 



Q 



Q 



Q 



i i si ion: What is the usual Petition Board policj In regard i«> hard* 
-in|i cases? 

answer: I think that the histot) of the Petition Hoard 
/\ would indicate that where extenuating circumstances are 

involved the student is readmitted and given another chance. 
This is one of the main purposes of the Petition Board and the 
Petition Hoard always looks lor extenuating circumstances. 

As a side comment, it might be interesting — everyone seems 
to have extenuating circumstances. 



uestion: Is it true that very nearlj twice as many Btudents were dis- 
missed from the Universitj as in any previous single year? 
A nswer: Yes, that's true. About twice as many were dis- 
/\ missed last year as have been dismissed in the past. Now, 
it might be said at this point that whether this is to be in the 
future, we don't know, because we were certain at the time this 
plan was inaugurated that it was going to catch a number of 
people who had been more or less "floating" in the University, 
who would have to attain a 1.5 average, and who could not stay 
here simply because they had passed half of their work. 

As you know, we have about 10,000 students here at Col- 
lege Park, and we have between 8,500 and 9,000 undergraduate 
students. So, actually, although we lost what seems to be a rather 
large number, the percentage was not excessive. We hope that 
the percentage will be reduced some as we go along. I would 
say, however, that there is good reason to believe that about 
20-25 percent of the students admitted are not qualified for various 
reasons, to do University work. The identification of these at the 
beginning is the problem. 



UESTION: Dr. Elkins, roughly what percentage of students enrolled 
were dismissed last year? 

i nswer: About 12 percent — and this is not excessive in 
/\_ view of the large numbers of students we have enrolled. 



UESTION: Dr. Elkins, I understand that a very high level of scholar- 
ship is maintained by a good proportion of the student 
body. How many students were named to the University 
Honor List last semester? 

A nswer: Figures from the Office of the Registrar report 
jTjl that 405 students are in the 3.5 group or above. 



Q 



UESTION: What about the Probation Plan? Are there any changes or 
readjustments that are contemplated? 

A nswer: Yes, we knew at the time that this Probation 
j\ Plan was adopted that it was going to require constant 
study. It is being studied all of the time by a faculty committee 
on admissions and this committee at the present time is being 
re-organized, and will re-study certain aspects of the Plan or 
perhaps the whole Plan during this semester. It's my feeling, let 
me say, that there are certain things that ought to be changed — 
I won't go into those at the present time because the committee 
has got to make its study and come up with recommendations. 
I have this morning talked with the Chairman of the committee, 
who has been chairman for the past two years — Dr. Manning — 
and he has indicated to me some changes which he feels would 
be advisable in the light of the experience we've had up to the 
present time; changes that would be in the interest of the students. 
What we are thinking of are things that would still enable us to 
maintain the standards that we want but at the same time might 
give some relief to students who eventually are going to do all 
right in the University. 

(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 






Q 



Q 




i isiion: Is it your opinion, sir. that a plan similar to the Prohatioi 
Plan of Maryland i» essential in order to maintain prop* 

educational standards and gain national respect and KCOg 
nition lor the I niversity? 

A NSWER: I think that our Plan, while it needs some refine 
71 ment. and some re-consideration in some of its aspects \- 
generally a reasonable plan. I do not believe that as we are findim 
things today — more and more students going to high school ; 
practically everyone graduating from high school, and a largei 
percentage each year wanting to attend college and universities 
because they see the need for further education — that we can have 
a good educational program without having a probation plan 
something similar to what we have now. If we had highly selective 
admissions, then perhaps we wouldn't need a plan of this kind. 
But if this is our means of eliminating those who do not want to 
do work at the University or who are not qualified, then we must 
continue this as it is or something similar to it. 

UESTION: In other words, this increases the value of the student-" 
diploma? 

answer: Yes. today it certainly does. Now. let me make 
jTx this clear. I realize that we have had many fine graduates 
in the past, and that they did not graduate under this plan and did 
excellent work. But conditions have changed a great deal. It 
used to be that a few people finished high school and those people 
prepared for college and practically all who finished high school 
went to college prepared for it. Today, almost everyone is finish- 
ing high school, and many of them are wanting to go on to college. 
and many of them are not qualified to go on to college. This is 
quite a different situation than we had 15 or 20 or 30 or 40 years 
ago. and it's changing very rapidly. We are in a crucial period 
so far as higher education is concerned. If we do not at this time 
set and maintain standards that are reasonable and require students 
to perform in a reasonable manner, we shall, in all probability, be 
admitting everybody and graduating everybody within the next 15 
or 20 years, and our educational attainments will not be respect- 
able. 



Q 



Q 



UESTION: How has the faculty responded? Do they lend their full 
support to this program? 

A NSWER : I think it is quite clear that the facultv is very 
/l much in support of it since they approved it: in the begin- 
ning it was their plan, it was the committee's plan, it was de- 
veloped in consultation with me and carried to the Board of 
Regents: but essentially it was a faculty plan. So. I am sure that 
it has the support of the faculty, although I would guess that some 
faculty members would like to see some changes and others might 
like other changes. 

[Editor's Note: At this point Dr. Elkins assumed the role 
of questioner.] 

UESTION: Dr. Elkins: Nov* let me ask a question or two. because I 
am quite anxious to yet the point of >iew of the students on 
this sort of thine. While I do not believe that the students 



io 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Q 



uestion: 



have I'-i'i sufficient experience lo set up the requirement! 
tor a plan of this kind and it must be essentially a faculty- 
administration-Board of Regents plan, we are anxious to 
I i 1 1 « I out how it*s affecting tin* students ami what their re- 
action to it is. Vn«l apart from complaints from students 
who have been dismissed under the Probation Plan and 
w hose records clearly show that they were not college 
material in the first place, what do yon feel is the over-all 
reaction of the student body to the new standards? 
Mr. Briggs: All members of the student body at the University 
of Maryland are interested in the value of the education which 
they are receiving. 1 think that the atmosphere in which they 
receive their education is just as important as the actual learning 
itself. In many cases. I believe the need of clearing out the 
so-called five-year man or the six-year man has done a great deal 
to improve the atmosphere for the students in their learning 
environment — the atmosphere being that the students realize that 
there has been a need for an academic plan to encourage or make 
it mandatory that the students perform to the best of their ability, 
so to speak. I believe this plan is forcing them to work, and to 
develop their talents along the lines for which the University is 
established. The people who have been here in previous years, 
taking a minimum number of credits and remaining a maximum 
amount of time, have done a great deal to lower the value of the 
diploma and the name of the University. 

Dr. Elkins: Then would you say — I know that you cannot 
give me aeeurately the attitude of eaeh student on the 
campus, hut from your observation of students — that it has 
had the general endorsement of the student body? 
Mr. Briggs: I would say it definitely does have. 

Dr. Elkins: I am very glad to hear that, because we think 
that this educational business is a cooperative business, and 
that we're here to help, but the student has to do most of 
the work in getting an education. If we have a cooperative 
arrangement here and a plan that is generally satisfactory 
to the faculty and generally satisfactory to the students 
obviously we're going to do a better job all along the line. 
[Editor's Note: Mr. Briggs resumes his questioning here.] 



There has been some question about how the plan has 
affected intercollegiate athletics. Do you feel that the Uni- 
versity's sports program has been hampered or held back? 

A nswer: No, I don't think the University's sports program 
y± has been substantially hampered or held back by this plan. 
As you well know, the plan didn't go into effect until a year ago 
this past September — so anything that may have happened in 
intercollegiate athletics prior to that time cannot be blamed on 
the plan, and we didn't have such a good year the fall before this 
went into effect. In football, we won two games and lost seven 
and tied one. Last year was the first year the plan had gone into 
effect, yet we had a reasonable program insofar as football is 
concerned. We won the basketball championship, and a number 
of other championships — I don't know how many, certainly more 
than our share in the Conference — and we thought we had an 
excellent year. Now, I think it is true that the plan has caught 
some athletes this past year as it has other students, and if they 
did not make the requirements they were affected the same as any 
other students were affected. They have to meet exactly the same 
requirements as everyone has had to meet. They have lost more 
of their people than they have in the past; we have lost more 
students generally than we have in the past. I might add here 
that the policy of the Middle States Association of Colleges (our 
accrediting agency) has caused some changes which may have 
adversely affected our football program. 

(Continued on next page) 




NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



11 



Q 



Q 



2< 




12 



ESTION: Do we want strong athletic teams? 

y|Ns\\uc Yes. we want strong athletic teams. We have 
/l athletic teams and we go out and play games, and we play 
to win. We want our athletic teams. I believe, to be an integral 
part of the institution, to participate as everyone else participates 
in the institution, to meet the same requirements that everyone 
else has to meet, and we do not believe — certainly I do not be- 
lieve — that the policies of the University should be set tor any 
special group. No one should be a privileged group. The policy 
should be established tor the good of the whole Universin and 
for the good of the state. If it affects some group adversely, that 
is something we cannot help. We do want strong teams. 1 be- 
lieve that we can continue to have strong teams but I doubt if in 
the future any one team in our conference is going to win all of 
its games. We're going to lose some and we"re going to win some. 
We need and we want to have as strong teams as we can have 
consistent with sound educational practice. 

ESTION: How could one best sum up your philosophy of education 
including the relative place ol athletics in the program? 

A NSWER: University education is primarily concerned with 
Yl the intellectual attainments or achievements or development 
of individuals — that's its primary concern. We are also concerned 
in university education with the over-all development of the in- 
dividual. We have various activities that are geared for the pur- 
pose of enabling the student to develop in dramatics or to go out 
for athletics or to debate, or to participate in student government 
and many other things that you know about even better than I. 
All of these things are part of the university, are part of the de- 
velopment of the individual. But the core of it is the intellectual 
development of the individual. That must be the core of uni- 
versity education. But all of these other things contribute to the 
all-around development of the person. Athletics is a part of this, 
and all activities should be a part of the University picture and 
not off to one side. 

ESTION: What is your fondest hope for the future of the I ni\ersity 
and its student body? 

A NSWER: I said some four and a half years ago that it was 
/\ my hope that the University would attain academic distinc- 
tion, that if judged by anyone who knows about education inside 
or outside the state of Maryland, that they would say that this 
is an institution that has a sound academic program for its 
students. This is what I have wanted and want now to maintain. 
I should say that we want a student body that is serious minded. 
At the same time I realize that they're going to have fun and 
should enjoy themselves while they're going through the Uni- 
versity. But their primary interest is their academic work and 
after those first things have been done, and done well, that they 
then do second things and do them well. It's been said many 
times, of course, that you should work hard when you work and 
play hard when you play and in that waj you get the most out 
of life, and I think that is certainly true of students at the Uni- 
versity. It is my hope that as we go along that we can develop 
over a period of time a tradition of scholarship on the campus of 
the University, so that students, when they come here, know that 
they are expected to do a good job. that they will not be expected 
to do the unreasonable, that they will have good, sound instruc- 
tion from their instructors, and that, if they perform in a manner 
that is at all reasonable, they will come out of the University and 
will succeed in later \ears. 

We realize that we are being challenged, not physically today 
so much by other countries, particularly Russia, as we are being 
challenged mentally. And whoever comes out on top in this 
intellectual race is going to be the winner in the long run. Let 
us hope that it is our country. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Fund Monies Apportioned 
to Four Projects; 
Law Alumni Join 
Forces with Fund 









1 


■'■>i3i>i'ir p 111 


i 




mmmm 

Euro in » 




m, 


1 "'iii 




m 


«.Wm 


-.o*£S 



Library Fund $ 2,500.00 



J D - 


r$i 






jjp'v', 






titti s' PS" BB^' 



Scholarships $12,080.00 





,-■ 


V/ 


5cF ^ 


^ 


1 ; J 


■7 . •« 






tiij 


Si 


^H 




pecial Projects $21 ,715.00 




altimore Union $81,500.00 
Dormitory 



During rw Pounders Program in '58, mi Greater 
University ol Maryland Fond, the annual alumni roll call 
ol the University, received in cash and pledges $117,810, the 
I ndowmenl Office reports. I his figure is the amount received 
to September I. 1958 and thereafter gifts will be credited to 
the '59 program. 

I he Pinal Honor Roll was mailed in Mid-October showing 
the names ol .ill contributors in the various Pund regions. 

Of the contributions, $2,500 went to the librarj project, 
$12,080 to scholarships I almost 4 times previous alumni 
scholarship support). $21,715 to special projects (including 
facult) development programs, the heritage fund, and student 
aid), and approximate!) SSI. 500 tor the furnishings for the 
Baltimore Union Building. 

Over 2.900 alumni contributed to the Pund and some 1.000 
leading alumni assisted in the General Canvass 

In the Time-Life Direct Mail Awards at the '58 American 
Alumni General Conference, the Fund won an honorable 
mention, an outstanding achievement for a Fund in its first 
year of operation. 

For the roll call in 1959 the Fund program calls tor com- 
pletion of the Baltimore Union project, a flexible program 
of student aid designed to assist students of all schools and 
colleges on the most efFective basis, a library fund for both 
the new College Park and Baltimore libraries, and a new 
faculty projects fund. 



As in '58 this Annual Roll Call will be preceded by 
special gifts solicitation and there will be monthly direct mail 
appeals starting in January, followed by a regional General 
Canvass in March and April. The principal effort in '59 
will go to strengthening the General Canvass organization 
and to doubling the number of contributors. 

As in '58 the General Chairman for '59 is Dr. Albert E. 
Goldstein. He is assisted by Dr. John Krantz, Hon. Leon 
H. A. Pierson, Dr. George Anderson. Thomas Beam, Howard 
Filbert and Ronald O'Connor, as a Planning Committee. All 
were active in the '58 Program. The Board of Governors of 
the Fund is comprised of the Regional Managers and Special 
Gifts Committeemen. 

In this program the alumni are enabled to take practical 
steps in the overall program for the University's leadership, 
and according to Dr. Goldstein — "The main thing is partici- 
pation. We want all alumni to feel that they are behind the 
University, and that they are really willing to support it." 



Following an afternoon meeting of the Law Alumni 
at the Lord Baltimore Hotel on September 8th the Executive 
Committee of the Law School Alumni Association decided 
to join forces with the Greater University of Maryland Fund 
with special emphasis on Law School projects. Mr. Benjamin 
Rosenstock, President of the Law School Alumni Association. 
in a subsequent letter to all Law School alumni stated that 
he felt this move would avoid dual solicitation and appeared 
to accord with the wishes of the alumni. 

The Honorable Leon H. A. Pierson presided at the after- 
noon meeting and Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of the 
University, outlined the purposes and the operation of the 
Fund and answered questions from the floor. Dr. Albert E. 
Goldstein was recognized for his leadership in the Fund, and 
Mr. Albert Shuger was commended for his sponsorship of 
the event. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



13 



Introducing the University Regents 



This it the third and last in a scries of brief 

biographical profile* introducing alumni to numbers 

of the University's Board of Regents. Faithful to 

the traditions and ideals of our University, these 

men give themselves unreservedly in the 

University s welfare. 




FNOS S. STOCKBRIDGF 

Member 

Board of Regents 

Enos S. Stockbridge was born May 3. 1888 in Baltimore 
City, the son of Henry and Helen S. Stockhridge (Henr\ 
Stockhridge was Associate Judge of the Court of Appeals of 
Maryland from 1911 until his death in 1924). Mr. Stock- 
bridge received his education at the Friends and Boys Latin 
Schools in Baltimore City, and was graduated from Amherst 
College in the class of 1908. where he became a member of 



Chi Psi Fraternity. He attended the University of Mar\land 
School of Law from which he was graduated in 1910 and 
was admitted to the Bar in that \ear. In 1914 he was ad- 
mitted to practice before the Supreme Court of the United 
Stales of America. He was associated with the firm of Gam 
& Human from 1909 until 1917. when he became a partner 
in the firm of France. McLanahan & Rouzer where he re- 
mained until 1928 at which time he joined Mr. Addison E. 
Mullikin to form the firm of .Mullikin. Stockhridge & Waters 
This latter firm consolidated with the firm of Miles. Walsh, 
O'Brien &. Morns in 1953 under the name of Miles ft 
Stockhridge. 

Upon the death of Mr. Charles R. Schirm. Mr. Stockhridge 
was appointed by Governor Goldsborough in 1914 to succeed 
Mr. Schirm as counsel for the Board of Supervisors of Elec- 
tions of Baltimore City. 

In February. 1944 he was appointed by Governor Mc- 
Keldin. then Mayor of Baltimore Cit>. as Chairman of the 
Charter Revision Commission, which completed its work in 
November of 1945. The adoption of the recommendations 
of this Commission constituted the first overall revision of 
the City's Charter for nearly fifty years. As a result of his 
work on that Commission Mr. Stockhridge was selected in 
1946 to receive the annual award of the Advertising Club of 
Baltimore as "Man of the Year" for meritorious achievement. 

In 1951 Mr. Stockhridge was appointed Director and 
Chairman of the Department of Correction of Maryland, a 
position which he still holds. 

In the same year he was appointed as a member of the 

(Continued on next pase) 




OR. I HUM \S I!. S<| MONS 

Membt r 
Board of Regents 

Dr. 1iio\i\s b. Symons has been associated with the 
I Diversity ol Maryland for more than fiftj \ears as student. 
teacher, administrator and member of the Board ol Regent-. 
He present!) serves as Director of Public Relations of the 
Suburban [rust Company, Maryland. 

Dr. Symons graduated from the Maryland Agricultural 
College (forerunner of the University of Maryland) at 



College Park, in 1902. Upon graduation. Dr. Symons was 
appointed Assistant Entomologist and subsequently promoted 
as State Entomologist, a position which he held until 1914 
when he was appointed Director of Extension for the State 
of Maryland. 

In 1937. he received appointment as Dean of the College 
of Agriculture, continuing to serve as Director of Extension. 

On January 1. 1954. Dr. Symons was asked to serve as 
President. Pro Tern, of the University, until a new permanent 
President could be selected by the Board of Regents. He 
thus served until September 1. 1954. and was then appointed 
a member of the Board of Regents by Governor of the State. 
Theodore R. McKeldm. Dr. Wilson H. Elkins assumed the 
Presidency of the Universin at this time (September 1) and" 
his inauguration as the twent> -first chief executive of the 
University occurred January 20. 1955. 

Upon retirement. Dr. Symons associated himself with the 
Suburban Trust Company as Director of Public Relations 
and currently serves in that capacity. 

Dr. Symons has firmh believed in the econom) and effi- 
ciency of the Board o\ Regents also serving as the Maryland 
State Board of Agriculture. This combining o\ responsibili- 
ties, he sa\s. "pro\ides tor a coordination oi all agricultural 
activities within the land-grant institution. ser\ing for the 
promotion of efficiency, econom) and pre\enting jealous) 
and competition as is evident in the man) states which main- 
tain separate Boards oi Agriculture." 

Dr. Symons ser\cs as a representative of the Board on the 

(Continued on next page) 



14 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



C . E. Ill II I II \s II U> \ W I Ml VARI1 I "i 01 INTERESTS KANG- 

ing from operation of mines and ranching properties in the 
West and farm and stainless steel properties in the East to 
the construction of a stainless steel plant in Kngland com- 
mandeered In the British Government at the outbreak of 
World War II. 

His activities have also included investment hanking, with 
particular emphasis on the development ot new industries 
and enterprises. He pioneered in the production of stainless 
steel research, and contrihuted greatly to the growth of the 
industry, through new developments in processes and prod- 
ucts, into what is now recognized as an indispensable 
material tor peacetime purposes as well as for those of war. 
The stainless business was sold to ARMCO in 1944 and 
merged with them; at that time it had grown to be the 
largest producer of stainless steel in the world. 

At present Mr. Tuttle is operating an uranium mine in 
Utah, his company being one of the larger producers of 
uranium. In addition, he is a member of the Board of 
Directors and Executive Committee of the Uranium Institute 
of America. 

His hobbies include hunting, fishing and riding, however, 
considering that he flies over 50,000 miles a year in con- 
nection with his various enterprises, travelling would appear 
to be his main hobby. 

Although he has, for some time, been actively interested 
in politics and national affairs, Mr. Tuttle has never sought 
elective or appointive office; however, he did serve on Mr. 
Hoover's Special Advisory Committee when Mr. Hoover was 
Secretary of Commerce. 

Mr. Tuttle has always been interested in education, and 
considers education a continuous process in a well-developed 
life. His principal intent is to be helpful as a member of 
the Board of Regents by collaborating with the Administra- 




c. LWING I U 1 II I 

Member 

Board of Regents 

tion and Faculty in building the University of Maryland into 
the great educational institution it should become. 

Mr. Tuttle is a member of the Maryland, Greenspring 
Valley, and Elkridge Clubs in Maryland; also the Chicago 
Club and Duquesne Club (Pittsburgh). He was appointed to 
the Board of Regents in 1953, and is currently serving on 
the Agriculture. Budget, Endowment, and Hospital & Medi- 
cal School Committees; and he is Chairman of the Expansion 
Committee. He is also the Representative of the Board in 
connection with the University's Nuclear Program. 

Mr. Tuttle has a daughter and one grandson, both of 
whom reside in Maryland. 



M R. STOCKBRIDGE 

Commission on Administrative Organization of the State of 
Maryland of which he became Vice-Chairman. and upon the 
resignation of Simon E. Sobeloff, now Circuit Judge of the 
U. S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, Mr. Stock- 
bridge was appointed by Governor McKeldin as Chairman 
of that Commission. Many of the recommendations of that 
Commission have been carried into effect by legislation, 
probably the most outstanding being the modernization of 
Maryland's budget system, the reorganization of the Depart- 
ment of Parole and Probation, and provision for Municipal 
Home Rule. 

In November, 1955. Mr. Stockbridge was appointed by the 
Governor to the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland, upon recommendation of the University's Alumni 
Association. Mr. Stockbridge is Chairman of the Hospital 
and Medical School Committee of the Board, and a member 
of the Building Committee, the Expansion Committee, and 
the Patent Committee. 

Mr. Stockbridge is a member of the American, State and 
City Bar Associations, and was President of the latter during 
the year 1947-1948. He is a member of the Franklin Street 
Presbyterian Church and a member of its Session. 



He is a Director of The Black and Decker Manufacturing 
Company. The H. B. Davis Paint Company and The 
Southern Hotel. 

In July, 1957, Mr. Stockbridge was appointed by Governor 
McKeldin as Chairman of the Maryland Self-Survey Com- 
mission to study the State government and recommend 
changes. 



DR. SYMONS 

State Soil Conservation Committee, which supervises an im- 
portant conservation program in cooperation with the District 
Supervisors and the U. S. Conservation Service. 

Referring to his membership on the Board. Dr. Symons 
says it represents "a diversified interest in all phases of educa- 
tion, research, extension and control activities. It is a 
harmonious group of capable men. supporting the President 
and administration of the University and its diverse activities 
throughout the State." 

Dr. Symons received an honorary Doctor of Agriculture 
degree from the University in 1918. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



15 




Riversdale railroad station 



Maryland 

and the 

Pioneer Telegraph 



With this article, Dr. Verne E. Chatelain. Professor 
of History, takes up the history series begun in 1957 
by Frederick S. De.Marr. Assistant Dean of Men. 
The response to this series, detailing various aspects 
of the rich and colorful heritage of the University 
and the State, has been overwhelmingly favorable. 
The editors hope readers will continue to send letters 
commenting on this scries. 




Calvert's Riversdale 



By 

Dr. Verne E. Chatelain 

Professor of History 

Till IIIK1II I HAT AMERICANS TODAY ARE EXPERIENCING WITH 

respect to scientific achievements, indicative of the prospec- 
tive conquest of Outer Space, has perhaps its interesting 
parallel approximately 115 years ago. when electrical energy 
was first successfully applied in an important invention, the 
Morse telegraph. And. to Marylanders. that momentous 
event, resulting in the solution of the problem of sending 
messages for long distances through space, has a special 
meaning, because the culminating developments took place in 
the Old Line State and were closely associated with the life 
of Charles B. Calvert of "Riversdale". descendant of the 
1 ords Baltimore, — that remarkable man whose vision and 
persistence had so much to do with laying the foundation 
stones for the establishment of both the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture and the University of Maryland. 

That "the first electro-magnetic recording telegraph line 
in the United States" was constructed in 1 S44 between Balti- 
more and Washington is a fact well known to most college 
history students. But what possibly is not so well understood 
is the drama associated with the efforts to develop this, the 
first successful commercial telegraph, and particularly the 
part played in this historic invention by the people of the area 
from Baltimore to Washington, and most of all by those of 
the communities from Bladensburg to Beltsville along the 
"\\ ashington Branch" o\ the Baltimore and Ohio railroad. 

In 1837, Professor Samuel F. B. Morse petitioned the 
United States Congress for official recognition and for 
financial assistance in building a commercial telegraph line. 



He had been for some time experimenting with the ideas of 
sending messages through copper wires with the use of elec- 
tro-magnetic batteries. 1 Now he sought to demonstrate the 
feasibility and value of the telegraph, by a line to link the 
Nation's capital and Baltimore. This petition, as had so often 
been the case, fell on relatively deaf ears in official Wash- 
ington. There was brief and polite show of interest, but. 
generally speaking, most people were inclined to regard him 
as an impractical visionary, if not actually something worse. 
Besides, a serious financial depression had gripped the coun- 
try, follow ing hard on the heels of Andrew Jackson's war 
on the United States Bank, and there were presumably more 
important matters to occupy the attention of the Congress. 
So Morse was treated somewhat abruptly, and was pushed 
aside and soon forgotten. 

Five years went by. — a long time for a man of Morses 
temperament and very meager resources. Fortunately, not 
all was lost, for the inventor had already won some important 
and valuable allies. — among them the then Commissioner of 
Patents. H. L. Ellsworth and his daughter. Annie. Also there 
was Charles B. Calvert, who. in 1838, had just taken over 
"Riversdale" after the death of his lather. George Calvert, the 
son-in-law of the distinguished Baron de Stier. founder of the 
place. Charles though a man scarcely more than thirty 
then, was already mature and widely respected — with a large 
circle of friends both in Maryland and in the Nation's capital, 
including such figures as the great Henr\ Clay, and John P. 
Kennedy, member of the Congress from the Baltimore dis- 



16 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



rict. I he new master ol "Riversdale" was developing his 
ountry place along lines projected earlier bj his grandfather, 
he Baron. — as an ambitious experimental farm using the 
nost advanced agricultural methods. And Calvert himself, 
jesides having a social position richlj endowed with the 
lood of noble ancestors, was tasi becoming recognized as a 
horough student of scientific agriculture, as well as the pos- 
.csnoi of the sort of ability that could bring to practical rc- 
li/ation the fertile plans of his imagination. He was just the 
Ind of a man to appreciate, and then to help, a struggling 
nventor such as Morse. 

T HAPPENED, Illl Rl I OKI, I HAT MORSE, IN 1842, WAS IN- 

:ouragcd to renew his petition, — this time on the basis of 
nore precise proposals, and sponsored in Congress by Mr. 
Kennedy of Baltimore. Previous consent had been obtained 
'rom the Baltimore and Ohio railroad to use its Washington 
branch right of way. should the Congress see fit to authorize 
he construction of a telegraph line. Even so, it was a long 
lard battle; and it was not until the very last day of the session 
hat an act was passed appropriating thirty thousand dollars 
to test the practicability of establishing a system of electro- 
nagnctic telegraph." General supervision was placed in the 
lands of the Secretary of Treasury, who was empowered to 
negotiate with Morse, to approve construction plans and 
personnel, and to make the funds available, as conditions, in 
his judgment, warranted. 

Morse promptly presented his detailed plans and secured 
approval for hiring, as his assistants. Leonard D. Gale, James 
C. Fisher, and Alfred Vail. These were men who had worked 
with him in earlier stages of his experiments; and they were 
trusted associates. The next step was to purchase and to 
assemble at Baltimore the copper wire, lead piping and other 
materials for the construction. These were on hand early in 
1843; and soon the work was under way. The point of 
starting was near the docks at the corner of Light and Pratt 
Streets. There one of the two electro-magnetic batteries was 
installed, and connected to the copper wiring by a copper 
sheet, five feet in length and two and one-half feet wide. The 
other battery was to be placed in Washington. 



notes: 

1 Samuel Finley Breese Morse was born in the year, 1791, in Massachusetts 
and died in 1872 in New York. He was an outstanding artist and sculptor, 
and for many years was a professor in that field at New York University. 
As an inventor he developed a flexible piston pump and a marble cutting 
machine in addition to the telegraph. Personally, he was a man of command- 
ing presence and attractive conversational ability. He had many friends 
who were themselves famous, like Benjamin Silliman and William Sturgeon, 
the great scientists; and James Fenimore Cooper, the writer. His interest 
in electricity apparently stems from lectures that he attended at the New 
York Athenaeum in 1817. The telegraph idea, together with the initial idea 
for the telegraphic code bearing his name, probably developed in his mind 
on a boat trip from Paris where he had been studying art. That was in the 
year, 1832. See the Dictionary of American Biography (Centenary Edition), 
Volume XIII-XIV, pages 247-51. 

2 For a reasonably accurate and adequate early account of the building of 
the telegraph line between Washington and Baltimore, see J. Thomas Scharf, 
History of Baltimore City and County (Philadelphia. 1881), pages 502-9. 
Scharf also contributes in this account considerable information about the 
extension of the telegraph system in Maryland and elsewhere. Ezra Cornell's 
later work in New York State with the telegraph, as well as many other 
phases of his amazing career, is mentioned in A Short History of New 
York State, (by the authors, David M. Ellis, James A. Frost, Harold C. 
Syrett, and Henry J. Carman). Cornell University Press (1957). See 
especially pages 254-5. Cornell University is of course named after him. 

3 A brief biography of Charles B. Calvert is to be found in the Dictionary 
of American Biography (Centenary Edition), Volume 1II-IV, pages 447-8. 
Calvert had no extended political career, but he was a member of the 
Maryland legislature in 1838 and in the early 1840's; and he was a member 
of the National House of Representatives in the early 1860's, where he took 
a staunch Union position. This truly great man's claim to fame, however, 
was in his tireless service to the cause of agriculture, where his strong 
personal influence and many friends, coupled with his deep scientific knowl- 
edge made him perhaps the foremost agricultural leader of his day. The 
story of the Calvert home is told in a booklet prepared under the auspices 
of the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Prince 
Georges County Regional Office, entitled The Calvert Mansion, "Riversdale". 
See also Frederick S. DeMarr's article, "Mr. Calvert of Riversdale" in 
The Maryland Magazine, Volume XXVIII, Number 6, September-October 
(1957). pages 12-13. 



For mi mm ITSELF, 26500 POUNDS OI COPPER wiri had 

boon purchased. I his was Id Ik- insulated and then placed 
underground adjacent to the "sleepers" Ol the Baltimore and 

Ohio tracks, using the lead piping as a protective covering. 

Of this piping, one inch in diameter, through which the 
wire was to run. 141500 pounds hail been obtained. Outla 
percha insulation was of course unknown at thai time I hus, 
in order to coat the wire. Morse improvised a hot mixture 
of asphaltum, beeswax, rosin ami linseed oil. Ihiough this 
the wire was drawn and then pulled through sections ol the 

piping as needed. By October, 1843, construction out ol 

Baltimore had reached Relay Station, at which point Morse 
decided on a test of the equipment so far installed, He would 
do this by sending a message into Baltimore anil receiving 
an acknowledgement. But the message did not get through, 
and it was evident that the line was not functioning! 



This failure presented a serious crisis for morsi . ii\i i 
of the thirty thousand dollar appropriation had been spent. 
Under perfect conditions, he had counted on barely being 
able to finish construction to Washington before winter would 
put an end to outdoor work. In the circumstances, he could 
not afford to continue without first finding the trouble and 
its remedy. But this might involve a long and costly delay 
that could defeat the entire project. He suspected — what later 
proved to be true — that his method of insulating the wires 
inside the lead piping was somehow faulty, especially with 
an underground installation. 

Fortunately, Morse had shrewdness, as well as courage. So 
he discreetly kept his troubles to himself, knowing that the 
Secretary of Treasury might cut him off from any additional 
funds, if the true state of affairs were made public. Instead, 
he announced that he would break off construction in view 
of lateness of the season, and then be ready to start promptly 
again early the next year, as soon as weather conditions 
would permit. 

Meanwhile, with the help of the crew, he moved all of his 
equipment by rail to Washington, where, from Mr. Ellsworth, 
the Commissioner of Patents, he secured permission to store 
it in the basement of the Patent Office at Seventh and F 
Streets. Discussion now began with the Commissioner and 
with his own associates to find the cause of the failure at 
Relay Station. Morse suggested his theory of faulty insula- 
tion, but that raised the further question of how to cure the 
difficulty without losing the Congressional appropriation. 
Into the situation at that point came a young construction 
engineer, Ezra Cornell of New York. He proved to be the 
man with the answer. He proposed that the underground 
system be abandoned in favor of overhead wires supported 
on poles! Morse agreed that it was worth the gamble; and so 
it was that Ezra Cornell was added to the staff. He spent 
the rest of the winter securing and preparing chestnut poles 
of suitable size and length, as well as an equal number of 
crossbars, to be attached near the top of each of the poles. 
The crossbars were notched on the top side near each end; 
and in the notches the two wires for the circuit were to be 
inserted. After the wires were inserted, wedges would be 
driven into the notches to hold them firmly in place, includ- 
ing the waxed canvas wrapping around the wires. Thus was 
originated what has become so familiar a part of the land- 
scape in the modern world — -the upright pole and crossbar 
carrying wires for the transmission of messages and electrical 
power! 

{Continued on page 23) 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



17 




By Victor Holm, Field Secretary 

Publicity Chairmen should Address Reports 

of Meetings and Activities to Mr. Holm, 

Alumni Association, Administration Building, 

University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 



I 



PROGRAM TO l-.STABI ISH Al.UMNI CLUBS 

Last spring about 6,000 LETTERS 
were sent to all the Alumni of Mary- 
land counties where there are no exist- 
ing Alumni Cluhs. The Alumni were 
requested to return an enclosed post- 
card stating their desire to participate 
in a University of Maryland Alumni 
Club in their area. The response was 
good enough to helieve that this fall 
we will have an active Alumni Club 
going in just about every county. 
Chairmen have been selected to serve 
on organizational committees, and in 
some instances preliminary organiza- 
tional meetings have been scheduled. 
The counties included in this organiza- 
tional program are: Montgomery, 
Washington. Cecil, Anne Arundel, 
Kent, Queen Anne, Caroline, Talbot. 
Charles, St. Mary's, Calvert, Carroll. 
Harford, and Howard. Washington. 
D.C. is also included. 

Any interested Alumni who wish to 
participate in Alumni Club activity 
should contact the Alumni Office in 
College Park. 

The next meeting of the New York 
Alumni Club will be held on December 
3, 1958. There will be a banquet and 
distinguished guest speaker. Those 
who would like to attend or have more 
information should contact Mr. Hal 
McGay c/o McDonnell Co., 120 
Broadway, New York 5, New York. 

Al.UMNI GATHER IN WIESBADEN FOR 
SECOND ANNUAL MEETING 

The EUROPEAN CHAPTER OF THE 

Maryland Alumni Association held its 
second annual meeting in the Cherry 
Room of the General Von Steuben 
Hotel. Wiesbaden, on September 6, 
1958. Guest of honor at the occasion 
was Dr. Ray Ehrensberger, Dean of the 
College of Special and Continuation 
Studies. He was accompanied by Dr. 
Robert C. Larson. Assistant Director 
of The European Division's Heidelberg 
office. 

Photograph on Page 24 

Colonel Edward J. Fletcher, of 
DCS installations. Hq. USAFE, past 
President of the Chapter, opened the 
meeting with a review of the Chapter's 
activities since its formation at 



Berchtesgaden in May of last year. His 
remarks were supplemented with de- 
tails furnished by Lieutenant Colonel 
Kenneth S. Vandergrift, Chief, Pro- 
curement Division, Bremerhaven Port 
of Embarkation, the Secretary and 
Treasurer of the group. 

Colonel Vandergrift stated that the 
primary aim of the Chapter was to 
encourage students in the European 
Division, and this was the reason for 
introducing Associate Memberships for 
those who complete 12 hours of Mary- 
land work. 

Colonel Vandergrift suggested that 
the next meeting of the Chapter be 
held on Commencement Day at Heidel- 
berg to coincide with the time when 
many Marylanders gather there. 

He pointed out that the Chapter now 
has 81 names on the active list but 
that many dues-paying members at 
College Park are in Europe and are 
unfamiliar with the work of the 
Chapter. 

Dean Ehrensberger reviewed the 
problems and prospects of the Program 
in Europe and in the Far East, explain- 
ing why an austerity rule had been 
introduced in the administration of the 
program in Europe during the past 
academic year. He added that the rule 
will also obtain for the 1958-59 year. 

At the end of the business meeting, 
new officers were elected for the cur- 
rent academic year. 

Colonel Ed Fletcher was succeeded 
by Colonel Ralph I. Williams. Logistics 
Division, SHAPE, as President, while 
Lieutenant Colonel Robert S. Jordan. 
Intelligence. Hq USAFE. was elected 
Vice - President, replacing Colonel 
Logan Schultz of Hq. 7th Army. 

By unanimous choice Lieutenant 
Colonel K. S. Vandergrift was elected 
to the post of Secretary-Treasurer for 
another term. 

BALTIMORE CLUB 
The Al.UMNI CLUB OF BALTIMORE 

staged its opening event of the 1958- 
1959 alumni season by holding a Presi- 
dent's Reception November 19. The 
reception got under way about 6 p.m. 
at the Park Plaza Hotel in Baltimore. 
Many members and many friends of 
members were present to initiate the 



new year of activities. 

Plans for the future include a Board 
of Regents Luncheon in February and 
the annual meeting of the Club in May. 



OFFICERS 
ALUMNI CLUB OF BALTIMORE 

President Charles ellinger 

1st Vice-Pres DAVE BIEN 

2nd Vice-Pres ETHEL TROY 

3rd Vice-Pres james w. stevens 

Secretary DON peacock 

Treasurer wm. hucksoll 

Executive Board 

james swartz Agriculture 

john lampe Arts & Sciences 

JOHN T. RABAI BPA 

dr. w. buckey clemson . . . .Dentistry 

james c. proctor Education 

ARTHUR van reuth Engineering 

mrs. katherine m. ritter . .Home Ec. 

J. MARSHALL NEEL Law 

dr. a. a. sussman Medicine 

mrs. anita M. wills Nursing 

dr. hyman davidov Pharmacy 

Committees 

program 

John Lampe. Chairman 

Sam Goldstein. Co-Chairman 

Samuel Silber 

James O. Proctor 

Mrs. Florence R. McKennv 

Mrs. Gretchen Van S. Welsh 

Wm. J. Hucksoll 

Dr. Charles W. Sylvester 

Dave Bien 

Beatrice Y. Jarrett 

Arthur VanReuth 

Frank J. Slama 

Sally Ogden 

Don Peacock 

CONSTITUTION & BY-LAWS 

Dr. Wm. H. Triplett. Chairman 
Wm. J. O'Donnell 
Wilmer Schulze 

(Continued on page 24) 



18 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR Sports Editor 



VARSITY TEAM SPORTS SCHEDULE 1958-59 



WINTER 



SPRING 



inn 

DEC. 

3 

6 
10 
1? 
17 
20 
29-30 

JAN. 

7 
9 

10 
14 
17 

FEB. 

4 
7 

10 

14 

16 

18 

21 

25 

27 

Coach: 



BASKETBALL 

OPPONENT PLACE 



North Carolina State Home 

Northwestern There 

Virginia Home 

Kentucky There 

Navy Home 

Wake Forest Home 

Sugar Bowl There 

Duke Home 

South Carolina There 

Clemson There 

Georgetown Home 

Duke There 

North Carolina There 

Wake Forest There 
George Washington Home 
North Carolina State There 

Clemson Home 

Virginia There 

North Carolina Home 

Georgetown There 

South Carolina Home 

H. A. MILLIKAN 





RIFLE 




DATE 


OPPONENT 


PLACE 


JAN. 






10 

17 


V. M. I. 

Army 


Home 
There 


FEB. 






7 
21 

28 


Navy 

U. S. Coast Guard 

(Invitational) 

The Citadel 


There 
There 

Home 


MARCH 






7 
14 


V. P. I. 

Richmond 


There 
Home 


APRIL 






4 


V. M. I. 


There 


Coach: 


SGT. DAVID P. PRUITT, 


JR. 



CROSS COUNTRY 



OPPONENT 



PLACE 



OCT. 
10 
18 

25 

NOV. 



Navy There 

N. C. & Wake Forest There 
Duke Home 

U. S. A. F. Academy Home 
North Carolina State Home 
Virginia There 

A. C. C. Chapel Hill 

JIM KEHOE 




Here comes center A I Bunge! 






SWIMMING 


DATE 


OPPONENT 


PLACE 


DEC. 






6 


Wake Forest 


Home 


12 


V. M. I. 


Home 


13 


Pitt 


Home 


19 


Virginia 


There 


JAN. 






10 


Duke 


There 


14 


Georgetown 


Home 


20 


Catholic Univers 


ty There 


FEB. 






7 


Army 


There 


13 


South Carolina 


Home 


14 


Clemson 


Home 


18 


Navy 


Home 


20 


N. C. State 


There 


21 


North Carolina 


There 


26,27,28 A. C. C. 


Chapel Hill 


Coach 


BILL CAMPBELL 






WRESTLING 


DATE 


OPPONENT 


PLACE 


DEC. 






13 


Wake Forest 


Home 


JAN. 






10 


Pitt 


There 


17 


Navy 


There 


FEB. 






2 


N. C. State 


Home 


7 


V. P. I. 


Home 


14 


Penn State 


There 


20 


Virginia 


Home 


27 


Duke 


There 


28 


North Carolina 


There 



MARCH 

7- 8 A. C. C. Charlottesville 

Coach: w. e. "sully" krouse 



6-6 forward Charlie McNeil. 





TRACK 




DATE 


OPPONENT 


PLACE 


FEB. 






21 


Indoor Track — Navy 


There 


MARCH 






9 

28 


A. C. C. (Indoor) 
Florida Relays 


Chapel Hill 
Gainesville, 
Fla. 


APRIL 






11 


Duke 


Home 


11-12 

18 

24-25 

28 


Quantico Relays 
North Carolina 
Penn Relays 
D. C. A. A. U. 


Quantico 
Home 

Philadelphia 
Georgetown 


MAY 






2 
8- 9 


Navy 

A. C. C. (Outdoor) 


There 
Columbia, 
S. C. 



Coach: jim kehoe 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



19 



( ampus Notes 

Continued front page 4 



ease with which it ma) be employed, 
often \sill be viewed as outweighing 
its disadvantages, Because diplomacy 

at the summit is no more than a tech- 
nique tor conducting foreign relations, 
caution needs to be exercised that it 
does not come to he regarded as a 
fetish or an end in itself." 

Pointing out that the United States 
is relative!) new in the complex inter- 
national relations of the twentieth 
century, he concludes that the success 
ol a President on a summit basis, de- 
pends upon his abilitv to negotiate 
with foreign powers effectively. 

"When the President strides into the 
arena of the summit conference he 
must seek to achieve significant, if not 
spectacular, results; he must be pre- 
pared to bargain to obtain them: and 
he must be willing to face the conse- 
quences therefore in the United States 
and abroad. 

"The United States cannot therefore 
afford the luxury of mediocrity in the 
Presidency." Dr. Plischke stated. 

In that summit diplomacy is nothing 
more than "methodology." the ability 
of the President alone cannot guaran- 
tee success. 

"There must be mutual dedication 
if it is to succeed." he concluded. 

The study on summit diplomacy was 
undertaken as an independent and per- 
sonal research project, and it has been 
published by the University's Bureau 
of Governmental Research, with the 
assistance of a grant from the General 
Research Board of the Universitv . 

Professor Plischke came to the Uni- 
versitv in 1948. after having taught 
for two \ears at DePauvv University 
in Greencastle. Indiana. During World 
War II he served in the Navy, and for 
a time he was attached to the staff of 
the political affairs division of the 
Military Government Headquarters in 
Europe. 

Between 1950-1952. he was ap- 
pointed as special historian to the staff 
of the United States High Commis- 
sioner for Germain, in which capacity 
he wrote eight monographs, including 
studies of the government of the West 
Cierman Federal Republic, the govern- 
ment and administration of postwar 
Berlin, and the Allied High Commis- 
sion for German) . 

He is the author of several textbooks, 
including Conduct of American Diplo- 
macy, various additional monographs. 



and some twenty-five articles in the 
fields of diplomacy and international 
relations which have been published 
in professional journals and law re- 
v iews 

DR. IU RDE Ml VI ( on\ 1 s I ION 
Dr. Franklin L. Burdette. Professor of 
Government and Politics and Director 
of the Bureau of Governmental Re- 
search, participated in the American 
Political Science Association conven- 
tion in St. I.ouis on September 6. 

He served as chairman of a round 
table discussion on "Madison Avenue" 
techniques in political campaigns. 

Participating with Dr. Burdette in 
the panel discussion were Charles L. 
Clapp. Congressional staff member; 
Howard Penniman. Professor of Gov- 
ernment at Georgetown University; 
Austin Ranney. Professor of Political 
Science at the University of Illinois: 
and Charles A. H. Thomson of the 
Brookings Institution. 

REGISTRATION PROCEDURE REVISED 

The University of Nfaryland took the 
first step during its September registra- 
tion toward eliminating the endless 
number of information forms which 
students fill out annually during reg- 
istration time at all colleges and 
universities. 

A University committee has designed 
a student information survey consoli- 
dating much of the information neces- 
sary in planning for his welfare while 
attending the University. The informa- 
tion is mechanically processed in order 
that it may be readily available for 
effective use by units of the University 
offering services and programs to the 
students. 

According to B. James Borreson. 
Executive Dean of Student Life, the 
new system provides the needed in- 
formation much faster and as a result, 
direct services to students will be 
improved. 

He said that conversion to the new 
information system, one of the first 
ever undertaken by a large university, 
will not be completed until next year. 
A number of the forms, however, were 
eliminated at this year's registration. 

"The new approach to the age old 
problem ot gathering the necessary in- 
formation the University must have 
about its student body provides a more 
personal relationship between the 
students and the areas of the Uni- 
versitv with which he is associated, and 
cuts the time required for registration 
to a minimum." Dean Borreson stated. 

He pointed out that the requested 
information which includes prior 



schooling, job experience and skills, 
housing, health, interest and participa- 
tion in University organizations, and 
other general information is essential 
in planning for adequate Universitv 
facilities and activities. 

The Universitv s present and future 
services for students depend upon 
knowing and understanding how many 
students must work and what their 
special skills, handicaps, recreational 
interests, ambitions, and housing needs 
ma) be." he explained. 

M V\ PROGRAM IN RADIO CHEMISTR1 

The Department of Chemisirv has ex- 
panded its graduate training and educa- 
tional program in radio-chemistry, ac- 
cording to Dr. Nathan L. Drake. 
Professor and Head of the Depart- 
ment. 

A lecture course and two laboratory 
courses designed to provide training 
and experience in the use of radio- 
active tracers in biological, or life 
sciences have been added. 

Expansion of the program has been 
made possible by a $20,000 grant to 
the Department from the Atomic 
Energy Commission for the purchase 
of equipment and instrumentation neces- 
sary in teaching the courses. 

"The plentiful production, in nuclear 
reactors, of radioisotopes (substances 
which behave chemically like their non- 
radioactive counterparts) makes pos- 
sible the use of these relatively inex- 
pensive radioactive materials in the 
most varied ways." Dr. Drake stated. 

"It is possible to follow a radio- 
isotope through a series of reactions 
and to detect its presence by suitable 
means even when it is present in most 
minute concentration. Indeed, the 
presence of a radioactive atom in a 
molecule can be followed so exactly 
bv appropriate means that important 
conclusions relative to changes which 
occur in molecules in living things 
may be drawn." 

Dr. Drake said that the new program 
was instituted to fill the need for ex- 
perts trained in the use of radioisotopes 
in the life sciences. 

"The introduction of an expanded 
program is part of the steady and 
planned growth of the Department of 
Chemistrv." he explained. 

In addition to Dr. Carl L. Rollin- 
son. Professor of Chemistrv who has 
been teaching a one semester lecture 
course in radiochemistry during the 
past two years. Dr. Sitarama Laksh- 
manan will join the staff oi the Chem- 
istry Department. Dr. Lakshmanan has 
been using tracer methods in research 
in the University's Department of 



20 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZI 



Dair) for the past several years. A 
graduate assistant will also be added 
to the program, together with an equip- 
ment maintenance man 

Sixteen students can be accommo- 
lated for the 1958-59 academic year 

from among the various life and physi- 
:al sciences departments ol the I ni- 
versit\ and from members ol the 
unior stall's of neighboring federal 

installations. 

1 he short courses and a symposium 
jt approximately 30 lectures on the 
use ot isotopes in biochemistry are 
now in the planning stages. 

DR. COHEN HEADS DEPARTMENT OF 

MAI 111 M \1ICS 

Dr. Leon W. Cohen, a former program 
director of mathematical sciences for 
:he National Science Foundation, has 
seen appointed Head of the Depart- 
ment ot Mathematics in the College of 
Arts and Sciences by the Board of 
Regents and President Elkins. 

Dr. Cohen, a native of New York 
City, received his A.B. and M.A. de- 
rees from Columbia University. He 
holds a Ph. D. degree from the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

A member of the American Mathe- 

F'matical Society. Sigma Xi, Phi Beta 
Kappa, and the American Mathemat- 
ical Association, the new Department 
[Head has taught at the Universities 
[of Michigan, Kentucky and Wisconsin. 
| He was a Ford Foundation Fellow in 
the Institute for Advanced Studies. 

NOMA HOLDS TENTH ANNUAL 
CONFERENCE 

The tenth annual Office Management 
Conference was held on the College 
Park campus of the University October 
30. 31, and November 1, 1958. 

Technical sessions were scheduled 
on personnel testing, clerical produc- 
tivity and work measurement, manage- 
ment and employee training, systems 
and forms improvement techniques, 
and on the conduct of paperwork 
simplification and management im- 
iprovement program. This program of 
specialized training was offered 
through the cooperation of Area 3 of 
the National Office Management Asso- 
ciation for executives and supervisors 
engaged in activities involving man- 
agement responsibilities in business and 
government. Instruction was under 
the supervision of nationally prominent 
authorities in each field. 

BUREAU PUBLISHES SECOND REPORT 

In recent years, U. S. foreign trade has 
fallen into patterns which tend to con- 



sul \e domestic natural resources, ac- 
cording to a studs released recently by 
the Bureau ol Business and Economic 
Research. Under the title Some Rela- 
tionships Between U. S. Consumption 
and Natural Resources, 1899, 1947, 
1954. the Bureau released the second 
in a series of reports on a research 
program supported in part by a grant 
from Resources for the Future, Inc. of 
the Ford Foundation. 

The study also concludes that in 
terms of dollar value the output of the 
natural resources of the renewable type 
(primarily agricultural) are more than 
five times as important as the output 
of non-renewable or mineral resources 

The most important source of de- 
mand for natural resources is con- 
sumer household purchases, primarily of 
nondurable items, which in 1947 di- 
rectly and indirectly accounted for 
almost 90 per cent of all natural re- 
source requirements. All other types of 
final demand — the government, foreign 
trade, and investment purchases — upon 
which the economy depends for its 
growth, directly and indirectly required 
less than 1 1 per cent of natural re- 
source output. 

Foreign trade has been especially im- 
portant both in supplying and consum- 
ing natural resources in the U. S. From 
1899 to 1954 this country has directly 
exported a greater value of total 
resources than it has imported, al- 
though the gap is decreasing. This 
excess of exports is due primarily 
to U. S. sales abroad of renewable 
resources, which in 1954 barely ex- 
ceeded the value of minerals im- 
ported. The U. S. increasingly depends 
upon direct import of minerals from 
abroad. 

But the statistics on direct exports 
and imports of resources understate our 
growing dependence upon overseas 
sources of these materials since they 
record only movements of those natural 
resources entering international trade in 
their original, unprocessed condition. 
A significant proportion of natural re- 
sources is partially or fully manufac- 
tured in the country of origin before 
entering foreign trade. 

The study was made under the direc- 
tion of Dr. John H. Cumberland. As- 
sistant Director of the Bureau of Busi- 
ness and Economic Research. 

PHYSICAL THERAPY CURRICULUM 
ACCREDITED 

The Council on Medical Education and 
Hospitals of the American Medical 
Association has notified the School of 
Medicine of the accreditation of the 



Universit) ol Maryland's Physical 
I herap) ( urriculum. I he < ouncil in 

cooperation with the American Physi 

cal rherapj Association establishes and 

maintains standards Idi physical 
therapj educational programs ( riteria 

for approval arc based on sound prin- 
ciples oi organization, administration, 

curriculum planning, and instruction 
ami incorporate sound concepts ot 
general and professional education. 

The Physical Therapy (Urriculum 
was instituted by the University in 
1956. It is a four year course ol study 
leading to a Bachelor of Science degree 
awarded by the College of Physical 
Education. Recreation, and Health and 
to a Certificate of Proficiency in Physi- 
cal Therapy awarded by the School of 
Medicine. The curriculum includes 
general college subjects aimed at pro- 
viding a broad educational background, 
professional courses in the theory and 
practice of physical therapy procedures, 
and supervised clinical experience in 
hospitals and other rehabilitation 
centers. 

The first class to complete all re- 
quirements of the program was gradu- 
ated on August 29, 1958. The full 
approval of the curriculum is con- 
sidered by the Council on Medical 
Education and Hospitals to be retro- 
active so as to include this class. 

Graduates of programs approved by 
the American Medical Association are 
eligible for licensure by the Maryland 
State Board of Physical Therapy 
Examiners and for membership in the 
American Physical Therapy Associa- 
tion. 

REGENTS APPROVE APPOINTMENTS 

The Board of Regents has approved 
the appointments of an assistant dean, 
three department heads and seven 
faculty members. 

Dr. L. Morris McClure. Director of 
Student Teaching and Professor of 
Education at Western Michigan Uni- 
versity, has been appointed Assistant 
Dean in the College of Education and 
Professor of Education. He holds an 
A.B. degree from Western Michigan 
University, an M.A. degree from the 
University of Michigan and an Ed.D. 
degree from Michigan State University. 

Dr. Robert L. Green. Superintendent 
and Agricultural Engineer for the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, was named 
Head of the Department of Agricul- 
tural Engineering. He is a graduate of 
the University of Georgia, Iowa State 
College and Michigan State University. 

Professor A. Wiley Sherwood, who 
came to College Park in 1939 as an 
(Continued on next page) 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



21 



Campus Notes 

Continued from page 21 



Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, 

was promoted to Head of the Depart- 
ment ol Aeronautical Engineering. A 
graduate ot Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute and the University ot Mary- 
land. Professor Sherwood has held the 
positions Of Research Professor of 
Aerodynamics, Manager of Wind Tun- 
nel Operations and Professor of Aero- 
dynamics. 

Dr. Charles D. Murphy, a member 
of the University faculty since 1931, 
was promoted to Head the Department 
of English. He holds degrees from the 
University of Wisconsin. Harvard and 
Cornell Universities. 

Other promotions included Dr. 
Avron Douglis. Associate Research 
Professor, in the Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics, to 
Professor of Mathematics: Dr. R. C. V. 
Robinson. Assistant Professor, to Asso- 
ciate Professor of Dermatology; and 
Dr. Paul N. Winn. Jr.. Assistant Re- 
search Professor, to Associate Research 
Professor in the Department of Agri- 
cultural Engineering. 

Additional appointments to the 
faculty included Dr. Ernst J. Opik, an 
Astronomer at the Armagh Observa- 
tory in Northern Ireland, who was 
named Visiting Professor in the De- 
partment of Physics; Dr. Albert Rosen. 
Director of the Human Relations 
Center at the State College of Wash- 
ington, appointed as Associate Profes- 
sor of Psychology: and Dr. Jewel 
Golden, a graduate of the University 
of Florida, appointed Associate Pro- 
fessor in the Department of Textiles 
and Clothing. 

Dr. William J. Hart. Technical 
Director of the Barbizon Corporation. 
w as named Associate Professor of 
Chemistry at Maryland State College. 

STUDY OF STATE CITIES 

A study of the revenue sources of 
Maryland municipalities has been pub- 
lished by the Bureau of Governmental 
Research. 

Written by Dr. Maurice E. OTJon- 
nell. a member of the Bureau stall", the 
Stud) explores the complex sources of 
municipal revenue together with the 
multiplicity ol important intergovern- 
mental relationships with the State, 
counties and other municipalities. 

"Maryland cities and towns, com- 

22 



pared to municipalities in other states. 
are in a generally favorable financial 
position: but it is also true that some 
municipalities are encountering difficul- 
ties in finding revenues to meet ever 
increasing service needs."' the study 
concludes. 

One chapter of the study deals with 
the complex revenue problems of Balti- 
more City. 

The Bureau of Governmental Re- 
search, a Department of the College 
of Business and Public Administration, 
engages in studies and consultation in 
the fields of local, state, and national 
government. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSISTANT 
APPOINTED 

The appointment of Miss Elizabeth 
Wilson, former editor and science 
writer for several national publications, 
as Public Relations Assistant at the 
Baltimore campus was announced to- 
day by Robert J. McCartney. Director 
of the Office of University Relations. 

Miss Wilson is a graduate of the 
University of Nebraska and a member 
of Phi Beta Kappa. For five years, she 
was a staff associate with Fortune 
Magazine. She has held the position 
of Executive Editor of Science, a 
weekly journal of the American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science, 
and also served as Editor of Science 
Illustrated. 

Miss Wilson will handle newswriting 
assignments for the University Hospital 
and the five professional schools. 

The Baltimore University Relations 
office is located in the School of Nurs- 
ing Building at 624 W. Lombard Street. 

REGENTS APPROVE CAPITAL 
IMPROVEMENT BUDGET 

The University of Maryland Board of 
Regents today approved a capital im- 
provement budget for the fiscal year 
1958-59 of $5,820,271. 

Based on studies that project the 
growth of the University during the 
next ten years, the amount is approxi- 
mately the same as the requests made 
during each of the past three years. 

President Elkins pointed out that the 
very rapid increase in undergraduate 
enrollments on the College Park 
campus has created a feeling of urgency 
about realizing all of the requests this 
year. 

"In 1954 the University made a 
rather thorough study of the increases 
that might be expected during the next 
ten years, projecting an increase for 
the years 1955 through 1957 of 1.4%, 
3.39! and 3.7 r r respectively." he said. 



"These projections were based on the 
increased number of students graduat- 
ing from Maryland high schools." he 
continued. 

"With these three years of experience 
we have found that the actual increases 
are 8.9 r 4 . 7.4'; and 5.69S respectively. 
I his has meant that during the three- 
year period the undergraduate enroll- 
ment has increased by 1.000 rather 
than the expected increase of 500." Dr. 
Elkins reported. 

Dr. Elkins emphasized that planning 
ot the University has been on the basis 
that there would be approximately an 
S6 c /( increase in enrollment during the 
next ten years from the increases in 
high school graduate numbers. 

"University facilities." he said, "have 
been planned accordingly. Should the 
much more rapid increase continue, 
these facilities may well prove inade- 
quate." 

The principal new construction re- 
quested for the College Park Campus 
is a dormitory-dining hall unit at 
SI. 230. 000. a new Arts and Sciences 
building at S440.000. an additional 
floor on the Physics and Mathematics 
Building at S297.500. the request for 
planning funds for a new building to 
house music, speech, art. and a campus 
auditorium, the planning of a new 
building for biological sciences and the 
planning of a new student health serv- 
ice center. 

The requests for Baltimore have as • 
their basis primarily the creation of a 
campus that w ill allow adequate space ■ 
for the activities of the professional I 
schools and the University Hospital, 
and the construction of additional faci- 
lities for the many activities that are 
already under way. A request of 
SI. 158.000 has been made to meet "i 
further costs of the Urban Renews! 
Project in Baltimore. 

A request of SI. 70 1.000 has been 
made for the adding of five floors to 
the junctional wing between the Uni-' 
versity Hospital and the Psychiatric 
Institute in order to increase the num- 
ber of beds available in the Hospital. 
Funds are requested to allow for the 
planning of a new building for the 
School of Law and the School of 
Dentistr\ . 

The University, in addition to its 
regular teaching and research program, 
performs certain services for the State 
A very active phase is the program of 
Fire Service Extension, in which 
$150,000 is being requested in order 
to provide an adequate indoor training 
area, a new fire tower for the exer- 
cises of the volunteer fire companies 
who train at the University, and for 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



improvement of the outdoor training. 
"Undoubted, the Universit) is in a 
period of rapid growth and a period 
of increasing responsibility, ["he pro- 
grams that arc now under considera 
tion before Congress to provide scholar- 
ship aid to both undergraduate and 
graduate students, to set up a system 
for student loans to provide direct aid 
to graduate schools, and to increase 
the funds tor research through the Na- 
tional Science Foundation, can be ex- 
pected to have an impact on the Uni- 
versit) it approved." he concluded. 

$30,000 MICROBIOLOGY GRANT 

A grant of S30.000 has been awarded 
to the Department of Microbiology by 
the U. S. Army Chemical Center. Fort 
Detrick. Frederick, for continuation 
of research in the rapid detection of 
disease-causing bacteria. 

Since the project was begun at Col- 
lege Park in 1956. the Department has 
received grants totaling $78,750 to 
support the studs . 

The project is directed by Dr. P. 
Arne Hansen. Professor of Micro- 
biology, and involves the development 
of fluorescent antibodies which when 
placed in contact with pathogenic bac- 
teria will specifically combine with 
them, causing them to glow with green- 
ish-yellow fluorescence when placed in 
I a beam of ultra violet light. 

"By observing the color of a particu- 
lar bacterium through a high power 
fluorescence microscope, we are able to 
detect and identify the harmful organ- 
ism in a matter of minutes," Dr. 
Hansen said. 

He further explained that when 
rabbits are inoculated with bacteria, 
specific antibodies will be elicited in 
'the animal's serum which are active 
against the foreign organisms. These 
antibodies or immune bodies can also 
be used as highly specific reagents to 
detect bacterial species. The immune 
bodies are separated chemically from 
the serum and a fluorescent "label" is 
attached firmly to the purified antibody 
through a chemical reaction. 

This method of detection was 
originally devised by Dr. A. H. Coons, 
of Harvard University, in 1942. 

According to Dr. Hansen, as a re- 
sult of the work at the University 
of Maryland, a fluorescent antibody 
reagent acting specifically for the 
! typhoid organism has been prepared. 
In addition, the technique has been 
'successfully applied in the identification 
:of spores of the anthrax bacillus, an 
organism which causes a lethal disease 
jin man and animals. 



"As the technique is improved, it is 

not outside the realm ol possibility to 

produce a fluorescenl serum foi each 

pathogenic bacterium. When this is 

accomplished, the physician may be 
able to diagnose a suspected bacterial 

disease by direct office microscopv and 
proceed at once with treatment", Dr. 
Hansen predicted. 

The microbiologist holds a Ph.D. de- 
gree in Bacteriology from Cornell Uni- 
versity. He also holds a degree in 
Chemical Engineering from Royal 
Polytechnical College in Copenhagen. 

E. BENTON TAYLOR SCHOLARSHIP 
AWARDED 

Paul W. Bushman, the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. James W. Bushman. 3014 West- 
field Ave., Baltimore, is the recipient 
of the E. Benton Taylor Scholarship 
for study at the School of Dentistry 
next September. 

A graduate of Baltimore City Col- 
lege, Bushman received a B.A. degree 
in Biological Sciences from the Liberal 
Arts College of Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity this June. The Phi Beta Kappa 
will continue his education in the 
School of Dentistry. 

One of the finest awards in the field 
of dental education, the Taylor Scholar- 
ship was conceived and arranged by 
Mrs. E. Benton Taylor to perpetuate 
her husband's interest in the students 
of the School. 

The scholarship was first awarded 
at the beginning of the 1954-55 session 
to a member of the Class of 1958. It 
will be awarded annually to a member 
of each entering class, who will con- 
tinue to receive its benefits during the 
four years of his dental school course. 

EASTMAN KODAK FELLOWSHIP 

The University has been selected to 
receive an Eastman Kodak fellowship 
in chemistry for the academic year 
1959-60. 

Offered as a means to encourage and 
aid a deserving student studying for 
the doctoral degree, the award provides 
for tuition and fees as well as research 
expenses. 

Selection of the student will be made 
by the Department of Chemistry on 
the basis of his demonstrated ability 
in his major field of study and his 
strong scientific and professional 
promise. 

AMERICAN POLITICAL STUDY 

A study on equilibrium and change in 
American politics, by Prof. E. E. 
Schattschneider of Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, has been published by the Bureau 



ot Governmental Research. Analyzing 

the nature Ol political change. K COn 

dudes that "the preservation ol the 
equilibrium is the function ol the politi- 
cal system." 

Prof. Schattschneider observes that 
"we i\o not object to the greatest pos- 
sible changes as long as they are gen- 
eral and everything changes at the 
same lime and changes approximately 
to the same extent." 

The publication is one ot a series ol 
studios in government issued by the 
Bureau. It is based on a lecture at 
the University by Prof. Schattschneider 
under auspices of the Bureau and ihe 
Department of Government and Poli- 
tics. Prof. Schattschneider. a former 
President of the American Political 
Science Association, is the author of 
several books on party politics. 



Pioneer Telegraph 
Continued from page 17 



During that winter morse also 
labored to install the battery in the 
basement of the United States Capitol 
Building, similar in design to the one 
already in place at Pratt and Light 
Streets in Baltimore. And, as soon as 
possible, the process of setting the poles 
was begun. They extended from the 
Capitol directly to the Baltimore and 
Ohio right of way and then in the direc- 
tion of Baltimore. - By April, 1844, the 
wires were in position well past Blad- 
ensburg and were approaching historic 
"Riversdale", which, since the construc- 
tion of the "Washington Branch", lay 
almost in the path of the "steam cars". 
In fact, the railroad passed for a con- 
siderable distance through the famous 
farm owned by Charles Calvert. 

April 9, 1844, was a memorable 
date in the development of the tele- 
graph, as well as in the history of 
"Riversdale". For, on that day the 
poles and wires reached a point directly 
opposite the great mansion, very near 
the site of what is now the Riverdale 
railroad station. Calvert, as might be 
expected, had followed the progress of 
construction with keen interest, and 
on several occasions had entertained 
Morse and his associates at his home. 3 
It was the propitious moment to con- 
duct the crucial test that would deter- 
mine once and for all the success or 
failure of the telegraph. 

In the National Intelligencer (Wash- 
ington) for April 10. 1844. appears 
(Continued on next page) 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



23 




News from the Clubs 

Continued front pa%e 18 



University of Maryland Overseas Alumni Chapter Officers, 1958-1959, elected at 
Wu tbaden, Germany, 6 September 1958: Lt. Col. Robert S. Jordan (Intelligence, Hq. 
USAFE), Vice President; Dr. Ray Ehrensberger; Col. Edward J. Fletcher t DCS Installa- 
tions. Hq. USAFE), Outgoing President: Col. Ralph I. Williams. (Logistics Division, 
SH \PE). President: Lt. Col. Kenneth S. Vandergrift (Chief. Procurement Division. 
Bremerhaven Port of Embarkation). Secretary-Treasurer. 



Pioneer Telegraph 

Continued from page 23 



the following dramatic announcement: 
— "The line of conductors is construc- 
ted as far from Washington as to a 
point on the line of the railroad op- 
posite the residence of Charles B. 
Calvert. Esq. (six miles) and the work 
is making progress at about the rate of 
a mile a day. The trial of it was made 
yesterday (April 9th). as the cars passed 
Mr. Calvert's, by communicating the 
fact of their passage to this point, at 
which the line begins, in Washington, 
and an answer acknowledging the re- 
ceipt of the intelligence was received 
hack in two or three seconds." The 
telegraph was in operation! 

Till REST OF THE STORY, DEALING 

with the completion of the telegraph 
into Baltimore, is in a sense anti-climax, 
despite the fact that histor\ usually 
has focused attention on that occasion 
on Friday, May 24. uhen the cryptic 
words of the message chosen by Annie 
Ellsworth. 'What hath God Wrought", 
were sent over the wires from the 
Nation's Capitol before assembled offi- 



cial guests to a waiting group in Balti- 
more. Suffice it to say that, between 
April 9 and May 24. Morse. Cornell, 
and the others associated in the enter- 
prise, had pushed on through what to- 
day is College Park (near the present 
campus of the University of Mary- 
land). Beltsville. and Laurel, testing as 
they went. On May 7. for instance, 
the Baltimore Sun carried the news that 
the line of poles was then 22 miles 
long, and that a message sent that day 
announced the Whig nominations for 
President and Vice President. Said the 
Sun, 'the fluid (sic) traversed the 
whole twenty-two miles and back again, 
making forty-four miles in no per- 
ceptible part of a second of time". 

The rapidity with which the com- 
mercial telegraph spread is noteworthy. 
After the completion of the Washing- 
ton-Baltimore line. Cornell went home 
to begin immediately a line from New 
York to Albany. It was soon finished 
and in operation, as well as one from 
Washington westward to Cincinnati. 
By 1861, at the outbreak of the Civil 
War. the telegraph spanned the con- 
tinent, connecting Washington and San 
Francisco; and. before the attack on 
Fort Sumter, it had already become an 
accepted method of carrying news to 
almost ever) part o\ the Nation. 



I-LBLICITY 

John Lampe. Chairman 
Alexander J. Ogrinz 

Ml MBERSHIP 

Arthur \ anReuth. Chairman 

Eugene Pessagno. Co-Chairman 

Bessie L. Arnunus 

< Wm \l\er 

Dr. Wm. H. Tnplett 

Ham K. Wille 

Nellie S. Bucke\ 

I I OISI ATIVE 

G. Kenneth Reiblich. Chairman 
Chester W . Tawnej 
Dave Bien 

STUDi n i i mem 

Frank Block. Chairman 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein. Co-Chairman 

James L. Benson 

Howard E. Ziefle 

Florence M. Gipe 

PLACE AM) \KK\S(,E.MENTS 

James Stevens. Chairman 
Sam Goldstein 
Frank J. Slama 

ROSTER 

Lorraine C. N'eel. Chairman 
Sally Ogden 
Francis J. Jannarone 
Thelma Kleckner 
Flora M. Street! 



College of 

AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 



win OM1 TO Mxm l xsn 

Dr. Allen L. Steinhauer has joined the 
staff of the Department of Entomology. 
Dr. Steinhauer is a native of Canada 
and a graduate of the University of 
Manitoba. He recently received his 
Ph.D. degree at Oregon State College. 
His research experience has been in 
the field of forage crop insects, fruit 
insects, insect physiology and toxi- 



24 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



oology. His principal duties >.v ill in- 
volve research on insects affecting 
alfalfa, clover, and other forage crops. 

JUDGING l II \MIMONS 

The Maryland 4-H Dairy team mem- 
bers, now world champions in dairy 
judging, are back home impressed with 
European hospitality, the good sports- 
manship exhibited at the Royal Show 
of England, and all aspects of their 
six-week trip. 

They were proud to have accom- 
plished their mission of doing a 
creditable job of judging in the Royal 
Show of England dairy competition. 
Team members, Jerry Ensor, Forest 
Hill; Roberta Messer, Rt. 2. Gaithers- 
burg; James Ray Hill. Woodbine; and 
Howard Stiles. Frederick (top in- 
dividual), are pleased, to say the least. 

The young champions learned a lot 
as a result of their trip. First, they 
learned more about dairy cattle as they 
observed and practiced judging in the 
two weeks of travel in Scotland and 
southern England prior to the contest. 

And they were again impressed by 
the hospitality of herd owners who 
felt honored their herds had been 
chosen for the U. S. team's practice 
judging experience. This schedule of 
judging was hard work. Sometimes 
there wasn't even time for breakfast. 
For example, in the final wind-up of 
practice judging before the Royal 
Show, they visited 10 farms in five 
days and really packed in the informa- 
tion. 

The only girl on the team, Roberta 
Messer, was the one to receive the 
team trophy from the Queen Mother. 
Each team member received two lovely 
medals. They were also special guests 
at a tea hosted by the Duke and 
Duchess of Baufort following the 
Royal Show. 

Yes, it was a full schedule. High- 
lights following the judging when they 
toured the continent included: Meeting 
Young Farmers Club members as they 
guided them on tour of the isles of 
Guernsey and Jersey; spending two 
and a half days at the Worlds' Fair in 
Brussels; and seeing Copenhagen. 

They visited a dairy farm, an arti- 
ficial breeding center and the agricul- 
ture college in Sweden; they saw the 
home of the Holstein breed in Holland; 
saw cheese being made; met Inter- 
national Farm Youth Exchange dele- 
gates and former delegates; saw cattle 
grazing along the dikes. They have 
many happy memories. And Mary- 
landers say, "Hats off on a job well 
done!" 



Ml (.1(1 I \ I l()\S \ 

John A. Meade received the Doctor of 

Philosophy degree last June liom Iowa 
State College. Ames. Iowa. Dr. Meade 
received his B.S. and M.S. degrees 
from the University of Maryland in 
plant physiology in 1953 and 1955. 

SUPPLEE DISCOVERS GROWTH FACTOR 

Growth responses were obtained when 
zinc was added to purified diets fed to 
chicks and poults. This and other find- 
ings from adding zinc to poultry ra- 
tions were reported by Dr. W. C. 
Supplee. '26, of the Poultry Depart- 
ment of the University of Maryland, 
at the Poultry Science meetings being 
held at Cornell University. 

Hock development was abnormal 
with chicks and poults, and abnormal 
feather development was observed with 
poults fed purified diets containing an 
isolated soy protein, casoin or soybean 
oil meal when no zinc was added. 
These conditions were relieved by 
feeding supplementary zinc. Improved 
growth and hocks also resulted from 
supplementation of a purified chick 
diet with eight percent dried egg yolk. 
Dr. Supplee stated. 

The nine week weight of turkey 
broilers kept on litter and fed practical 
rations was greater when 48 or 96 parts 
per million of zinc was added to the 
ration. In a four-week battery trial 
using a modified corn-soybean meal- 
type practical ration, growth was not 
increased by adding zinc, but feather 
condition was slightly improved, he 
reported. 

FUTURE ALUMNI 

Some 1,000 Maryland 4-H Club mem- 
bers come to Club Week each year at 
the University of Maryland to have 
fun and meet other clubbers, and also 
to learn something about agriculture, 
the home, and themselves. 

About 21 classes are taught that first 
week in August for their benefit. 
Johnny learns about career opportuni- 
ties, developing confidence, good man- 
ners and making friends. And he 
learns Indian tradition, and has an 
opportunity to discuss dating problems 
and ideas with other older club mem- 
bers. 

On the other hand, Joe, his younger 
brother, also a 4-H Club member, joins 
the younger age group to find out more 
about some of the agriculture projects 
he may be enrolled in. This year he 
found out "What's In a Cow", about 
breeding livestock, poultry, tractors and 
engines, safe and efficient use of elec- 
tricity, and about insects. 



\ i ir \ . Joe and Johnny's sister, joins 

the younger members to find OUt win's 

and "where for's" oi keeping a nice 

room, making "snackw Inches.'' sewing 
and modeling, taking cue ol money, 

safety, and "Growing b> Experience." 

But Club Week is not all "class- 

work." In the afternoons there are 
opportunities to learn about emits, 
sketching, athletic games such as soft - 
ball, volleyball and tennis, music and 
singing and how to do special dancing. 

COME UP AND SI I ME! 

The fine work performed by the 
County Extension Service in Frederick 
County has been rewarded by the 
County Commissioners with new mod- 
ern quarters. Formerly located at 1 1 5 
E. Church Street in Frederick, the 
Extension Office is now on the third 
floor of Winchester Hall, which is 
across the street from the old location. 
The historic building has been com- 
pletely renovated and modernized with 
elevator and air conditioned private 
offices for all. County Agent Henry R. 
Shoemaker extended a special invita- 
tion to the alumni to "zoom" up for a 
friendly visit and a view of historic 
Frederick. 

ITEMS 

P. E. Clark, '18, received the National 
Service Award from the National 
Association of County Agents. 

A recent visitor to the campus was 
Dr. J. Franklin Witter, '28, who was 
attending the National Poultry Con- 
gress. Frank has been named Head of 
the Veterinary State Inspection Service 
for the State of Maine. 

MR. AITCHESON 

A well-known equestrian of Laurel is 
Mr. Whitney J. Aitcheson. a 1916 
graduate of the University (then Mary- 
land Agricultural College) in animal 
husbandry. 

Aitcheson has spent his life raising 
horses and teaching people how to ride 
them. There are 29 horses now on his 
10-acre farm, located on Riding Stable 
Road, and about 120 children improve 
their riding ability under his direction 
every week. 

While a student, Mr. Aitcheson was 
a letterman on both the track and foot- 
ball teams. He was holder of the Uni- 
versity's mile record for several years, 
running the mile in 4 minutes 35 
seconds in a meet with Johns Hopkins. 
He played center on the football team 
captained by Burt Shipley, present 
baseball coach for the University. 

Mr. Aitcheson is married and has 
one daughter. He is presently raising 
a colt for his daughter's two children. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



25 



College of 
ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Lois Eld Ernest 



1)1 PARTMENT OF ENGLISH NOIIs 

Mr. William 1 Stahr. '5 1. has returned 

to the UniversitJ as a halt-time instruc- 
tor in the Department of English. 
Smee receiving his \l A. degree at 
Maryland in 1953, Mr. Stahr has been 
a doctoral candidate and part-time 
teacher at the George Washington 
L'niversitv . 

On the personal request of Ambas- 
sador John Hay Whitney. Dr. Carl 
Bode, Professor of English, will remain 
on leave until June. 1959. to continue 
his service as Cultural Attache in the 
American Embassy in London. Dur- 
ing his residence in London. Professor 
Bode has published numerous reviews 
and poems in British periodicals. 

Dr. Minerva Martin. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English, will remain in 
Munich during 1958-59 as a teacher 
of English in the University of Mary- 
land junior college program in that 
city. 

DR. FRAZZA PROMOTED AT CYANAMID 

Dr. Everett J. Frazza. Research Chemist 
at the Stamford Laboratories of Amer- 
ican Cyanamid Company, has been pro- 
moted to Group Leader in the Indus- 
trial Chemicals Research Department. 
it was announced today by Dr. Alfred 
L. Peiker. Director of the Laboratories. 

Dr. Frazza joined Cyanamid in 1954 
after receiving his Ph.D. degree from 
the University oi Maryland where he 
held a teaching fellowship. His work at 
Stamford has been primarily in the 
preparation of new compounds related 
to the synthesis of acrylonitrile. one of 
the basic compounds from which many 
of the company's products have been 
derived, including its new synthetic 
fiber Crcslan g developed at Stamford. 

A native of New Jersey. Dr. Frazza 
received his high school training there. 
After three vears in the Navy, he at- 
tended Seton Hall anil Rutgers Uni- 
versity. He received his B.S. in chem- 
istry from the Universitv of Maryland. 
Upon graduation he worked in the 
Applied Physics' 1 aboratories at Johns 
Hopkins University on missile propul- 
sion research in Silver Spring. Marv- 
land, before studying for his doctorate 
degree. 

26 



Dr. I ia//a is a member of the Amer- 
ican Chemical Society. Sigma Xi. 
honorarv research society, and has pub- 
lished papers in the society's profes- 
sional journals He is married and has 
two sons and a daughter. The familv 
lives at Van ( ortlandt ( irele in York- 
town. New York. 

NAMED H) ( till I I Dl IOKSHIP 

I'vke Johnson. Jr.. '37. has been named 
Editor-in-Chief of Anchor Books, a 
division of Doubleday & Companv. 
Mr. Johnson has served as Doubledav's 
Publicity Manager lor the past nine 
vears. 

He is well-known in publishing 
circles and has been a frequent con- 
tributor to American and British maga- 
zines and newspapers. For the past 
six vears he has written the "Editor- at- 
Large" advertising column which ap- 
pears twice monthly in The Saturday 
Review. With his wife. Lucy Black 
Johnson. Mr. Johnson was co-editor of 
"Cartoon Treasury." which was pub- 
lished bv Doubledav in 1955. 




Mr. John\<>n 



TELEVISION IO AID INSTRUCTION 

A closed circuit television facility at the 
University is available for student in- 
struction this fall. 

"The addition oi television will en- 
able us to enlarge our course offerings 
in the broadcast media, and thus to 
serve better the need of our students." 
Professor Warren 1.. Strausbaugh. Chair- 
man oi the Department of Speech. 
stated. Dr. Albin O. Kuhn. Executive 
Vice President oi the University, 
pointed out that closed-circuit tele- 
vision is being used in the teaching ot 
regular courses on a number of 
campuses. 



Two live studio camera chains, film 
and projection equipment and an 
audio-visual control center have been 
installed. With this set-up it is possible 
to produce a w ide variety of program 
iv pes and to distribute these programs 
to special monitoring receivers in 
Woods Hall classrooms and in Central 
Auditorium at College Park. 

According to Professor George F. 
Batka, Director ot Radio and Television 
in the Department, the addition of the 
equipment will enable the L'niversitv to 
supplement theorv with practice in the 
techniques and skills of this medium. 
Mr. Irving Linkow. Assistant Professor, 
will be responsible tor the development 
of new and special electronic applica- 
tions of the equipment to research and 
entertainment, and maintenance of the 
studios. 

Television courses during the next 
vear will be taught by Mr. Thomas J. 
Avlward. Mr. Avlward recently com- 
pleted work for his Ph.D. degree at the 
University of Wisconsin, with special 
emphasis in television techniques and 
its applications to American societv 

While training in television is the 
primary reason for the installation of 
closed-circuit television at the Lniver- 
sitv. additional uses of the facilities are 
possible. Plavs and other entertain- 
ment programs will be pre-rehearsed in 
the new studios and then taken as a 
package to one of the commercial tele- 
vision stations in Washington or Balti- 
more. 






HEADS WASHINGTON OFFK I 

John P. Mckee. '56, was recentl 
named Washington. D. C. Home Office 
Representative oi Pacific Mutual Life 
Insurance Company's Group Insurance 
Department. He is now responsible for 
the sale and service ot all tvpes of r| 
Pacific Mutual group insurance. 

\i vkii vRi I XHIBITS 

During the past summer, the paintings J 
of Herman Manl. \ssociate Protessorj 
in the Department oi Art. College of I 
Arts and Sciences, were exhibited 
widelv throughout the country. One of 1 
his large oils "Sentinels" was selected j 
bv the jury for the First Annual I 
Provincetown Arts Festival. Another j 
of his oils "Serenity" was shown at the I 
boston Arts Festival, and another of 
his canvases was shown at the Colorado 
Springs Fine Arts Festival. Two oi his 
works were shown at a new American 
Gallerv which opened in Paris, and 
other examples were shown in group 
shows in Provincetown and elsewhere. 
Mr. Manl also served on the jurv of 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



selection for the annual exhibition of 
the Provincetown Art Association. 

Mr. Muril is preparing for a large 
one-man show of his work, which will 
take place at the Babcock Galleries, 
New York City, in March. 

DEPARTMENT Oh CHIM1S1KY NOUS 

Dr. William J. Bailey. Dr. A. C. Boyd, 
Dr. Carl L. Rollinson. Dr. W. J. 
Svirbely and Dr. G. Forrest Woods of 
the Chemistry Faculty attended the 
i tall meeting of the American Chemical 
I Society in Chicago. September 7-12. 
Dr. Svirbely and Dr. Rollinson pre- 
sented papers at divisional meetings. 

Dr. Alfred Viola of Northeastern 
University returned to the University 
ot Maryland during the summer as a 
visiting post doctoral research fellow. 
He worked with Dr. G. F. Woods. 

New members of the Chemistry 
Faculty are Assistant Professor Sita- 
rama Lakshmanan. who is teaching a 
course in radio-chemistry, and Assistant 
Professor William Purdy, who is teach- 
ing courses in analytical chemistry. Dr. 
Lakshmanan has been a member of 
the faculty of the Dairy Department 
for some years, and Dr. Purdy came 
from the University of Connecticut. 

William M. Smedley, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, has returned to 
the Naval Academy after two years of 
teaching and study at the University 
of Maryland. 

Dr. George M. Brown, Associate 
Professor of Physical Chemistry has 
returned from sabbatical leave. He 
spent the past year at the California 
Institute of Technology as a Senior 
Research Fellow. 

AMERICAN STUDIES IN FOREIGN LANDS 

Dr. Margaret T. Cussler Assistant 
Professor of Sociology, has been work- 
ing on a research contract for the 
U. S. Department of State. She has 
made an evaluation study of the in- 
fluence of the International Exchange 
Program on the teaching of American 
Studies in foreign educational institu- 
tions. As it happened, her investiga- 
tions were largely confined to the con- 
sideration of the contributions of the 
American Fulbright professors and re- 
search scholars in foreign universities 
and foreign grantees who returned to 
their own countries after a visit to the 
United States. The report outlined for 
each country the general status of 
American studies, strengths and weak- 
nesses of the program; it indicated 
[existing potentials and made recom- 
Imendations for future conduct of the 
program. Besides this country-by- 
country survey, Dr. Cussler made 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



summaries ot the condition ol Ameri- 
can studies in Europe, the Far East, 

the Near Hast, and the South American 
areas. A final report highlighted the 
main achievements ami potentials on a 
workl-w ide basis. 

She found a considerable difference 
in attention to American Studies from 
one COUntTJ to another. Of course. 
1 mope was the center of this interest. 
Germany, Italy, Finland ami other 
countries have developed extensive pro- 
grams. World War II marked the 
"Great Divide." Before that, students' 
interests were largely confined to Bri- 
tish curricula, but, since, there has been 
some rapid progress. For example, 
within the last four years, six courses 
for credit have been established in four 
Italian universities and the Italian 
Ministry reports efforts to establish 
chairs of American Literature in Flor- 
ence, Rome, Naples and Genoa. Bri- 
tain, on the other hand, in spite of the 
lack of any language problems, has 
only one chair of American history 
and one Department of American 
Studies. 

Elsewhere in the world, the intro- 
duction of courses in American history 
and American literature have been less 
extensive chiefly because many coun- 
tries are still more occupied with the 
A B C's of their basic education sys- 
tem than with the sophistication of an 
American Studies program. This is the 
sort of situation in which an American 
"expert" in modern American litera- 
ture or nineteenth century American 
History is likely to find himself an 
English language teacher. Japan is one 
of the exceptions. Since the war, in- 
terest in American Studies has been 
so voracious that one British critic 
said "the supply of research projects 
was not enough to go round and the 
most trifling of essayists and the most 
unmemorable of poetasters are seized 
upon to serve as subjects for doctoral 
dissertation and subsequent publica- 
tion. It is like the siege of Paris . . . 
when even the mice and sparrows are 
taken for food." Visiting professors 
from the U. S. were feeding this in- 
terest by organizing seminars, courses, 
workshops and discussion groups. In 
Iran also definite progress has been 
made in American studies. Since 1950 
some nine courses have been intro- 
duced to the universities and a Depart- 
ment of American Civilization Studies 
is proposed for the University of 
Tehran. Here American trained 
grantees are important additions to the 
teaching staffs. 

Naturally, all did not go entirely 
easily for the American visitors. Fre- 



qucnlK the) reported students were 
doing very little preparation ami ex- 
peeled to receive all the information 
thej needed in then lectures, with no 

outside reading. I hey expected (he in- 
frequent examinations to be passed bs 

simply repeating memorized lecture 
notes. I ibraries were often verj made 
quate. disorganized, and sometimes 
carefully locked in case am one should 
think of using them. In one country, 
professors supplemented low salaries 
by selling their students passing grades. 
Sometimes it was difficult to discovei 
when school began and grantees were 
obliged to rely on students to keep 
them informed about vacations and the 
all too frequent holidays. 

Professors generally found them- 
selves very attached to their newly 
adopted country before they completed 
their one- or two-year stay. "Karachi 
Tummy," Chilitis and other euphemis- 
tically-described ailments, poor teach- 
ing conditions, vastly different academic 
and administrative standards did not 
prevent this. At the other end. their 
newly made friends were generally 
equally sorry to see them leave. In 
Burma, a group of household servants 
were so upset at the loss of "their" 
American Fulbright family that they 
steadfastly refused to start work for 
anyone else. The local Cultural Af- 
fairs Officer prevented a long-term 
strike by promising that they would 
be the ones to work in the home of 
the new Fulbright scholar. Professor 
Rod Horton visiting Brazil from Co- 
lumbia University was so attracted by 
the people and the country that first he 
had his grant extended and then, later, 
left New York to take up a U. S. 
Government post in the country he had 
grown to love. His is but one of many 
examples of how great understanding 
can grow through this Exchange Pro- 
gram. 

DEPARTMENT OF MICROBIOLOGY NOTES 

Dr. Leo R. DiLiello, who received his 
Ph.D. degree in the Department of 
Microbiology July, 1958, has joined 
the staff of the Biology Department of 
the Long Island Agricultural and 
Technical Institute, State University of 
New York, Farmingdale, New York. 

Dr. Earl R. Stadtman. Chief. Section 
on Enzymes, National Heart Institute, 
National Institutes of Health, has been 
appointed a Lecturer in the Depart- 
ment of Microbiology. Dr. Stadtman 
received his B.S. degree in 1942 from 
the University of California and his 
Ph.D. degree in 1949 from the same 
institution. He is recognized inter- 
(Continued on next page) 

27 



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Chemistry (1952): American Society 
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Washington Academy of Sciences An- 
nual Award in Biological Chemistry 
(1957): Federation of American 
Societies for Experimental Biology 
[ravel Award to attend Enzyme Sym- 
posium in Japan ( 1957). 

BARROWS RETIRES 

Mr. Paul R. Barrows. "11. has recenth 
retired as Supervisor. Bookkeeping 
Division. Mortgage Loan Department. 
The Northwestern Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company. In a letter to Mr. 
Barrows. Howard J. Tobin. Vice Presi- 
dent, stated "I am writing ... to ex- 
press to you, my appreciation tor the 
\erv fine job you have done for North- 
western in the years you have been 
here. . . . 

"Your retirement will be a loss for 
the Northwestern and for me per- 



sonally. I would feel rather bad about 
it except that 1 know you have been 
looking forward to retirement and the 
time it will give you and Mrs. Barrows 
to carry out the plans you have had 
for manv vears." 



28 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

John A. Daiker 



(TIDE TO STATE LEGISLATIVE 
PROCESSES IS PUBLISHED 

A modern guide to the legislati\e 
process in the State of Maryland has 
been published by the University of 
Maryland Bureau of Governmental Re- 
search. 

Written by Dr. George A. Bell and 
E\elyn L. Wentworth, staff members 
of the Bureau: and edited by Dr. 
Franklin L. Burdette. Director, the 
study deals in detail with the organiza- 
tion, procedure, apportionment, and the 
powers of the General Assembly. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



: 

D 



iii .1 foreword, Dr. Burdette notes 
that "the General Assembly ol Mar) 
land measures well among state legis 
latinos in its responsiveness to public 
need, attention to informed opinion, de- 
velopment of high standards of re- 
search and information, use of modern 
devices for budgetary control, and ad- 
berence to the essential safeguards ol 
careful parliamentary procedure." 

He points out that the Maryland 
legislative process is a result of proven 
and time-tested conceptions of constitu- 
tional law and procedures in the State. 

"The General Assembly is a modern 
body in the growing use of information 
and control devices in the making of 
public policy; it is a traditional body in 
the preservation of due process." Dr. 
Burdette declares. 

"It faces, as do many other legis- 
latures," he continues, "problems of 
constantly changing public needs as 
well as of rising and shifting popula- 
tion. The complex problem of ap- 
portionment has occasioned serious 
study and much discussion." 

The Bureau, a Department of the 
College of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration, engages in studies and 
consultation in the fields of local, state, 
and national government. 



School of 

DENTISTRY 



Kyrle W. Preis 



WEST VIRGINIA ALUMNI 

During the last West Virginia State 
Dental Association meeting at White 
Sulphur Spring, a luncheon was ar- 
ranged by Dr. Walter Brown for the 
purpose of discussing the formation 
of a West Virginia Alumni Section. 
Our President, Dr. Edwin Gail and 
your Editor attended this meeting 
bringing greeting and news of events 
elsewhere. 

Dr. Brown, as Chairman, asked 
those in attendance to express their 
views regarding this new Alumni 
activity. Dean Emeritus J. Ben Robin- 
son and the newly-appointed Dean, 
Kenneth Randolph, spoke eloquently 
on the values of continued loyalty to 
our Alma Mater, and encouraged 
strong support of organizational ef- 
forts. It was a pleasant and thoroughly 
enjoyable gathering. Those in at- 
tendance were: 

Doctors J. Ben Robinson, '14, 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



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Clarksburg. W. Va.; Edwin Gail, 18, 
Baltimore. Md.; I.aco W. Gochenour, 
"22. Clarksburg. W. Va.; J. A. Martin- 
dale. '29, Ansted. w Va.; Kyrle W. 
Preis. '29, Baltimore. Md.; Edgar B. 
Reese. 31. Fairmont. W. Va.: M. E. 
Brown. '33, Fairmont. W. Va.: Ken- 
neth V. Randolph. '39. Morgantown. 
\V. Va.; w w. ( order, "42. Buck- 
hannon. W. Va.: W. B. Broun. '44. 
Fairmont. W. V a.: John M. Mallow. 
'44. Marlinton. \V. Va.; C. R. Gerber, 
Jr.. '44. St. Marys, W. Va.; Theresa A. 
Edwards, '48, Beckley, W. Va.; 
Emanuel A. Kostas. '49. Whites\ ille. 
\V. Va.; R. L. Lou man. Jr.. '50. Buck- 
hannon. W Va.; Francis L. Edwards. 
'50. Beckley. W. Va.: William \\ 
Merow, '51. Grafton, W. Va.: Myron 
B. Hymes, Jr.. '51. Buckhannon. W. 
Va.; Glenn B. Poling. '51. Philippi. 
\V. Va.; Dr. and Mrs. H. B\rd Teter. 
'51. Franklin. W. Va. 

The following uere elected officers 
of the contemplated section: 

Dr. Walter Broun. President 

Dr. Laco Gochenour. 1st Vice- 
President 

Dr. Theresa Edwards. 2nd Vice- 
President 

Dr. Francis Edwards. Secretary- 
Treasurer 

Dr. Morris Broun. Historian- 
Librarian. 

The Alumni Association congratu- 
lates Dr. Walter Brown for his interest 
and wishes the contemplated West 
Virginia section success. 

NEW JERSEY MEETING 

On Wednesday, November 19. the 
New Jersey Alumni Section held an 
afternoon of clinics at the Robert Trent 
Hotel in Newark. Those invited to 
speak were: Dr. Irving Abramson. 
Assistant Professor of Oral Medicine, 
speaking on "Endodontics"; Dr. Wil- 
bur Ramsay, Associate Professor of 
Dental Prosthesis, speaking on "Hyp- 
nodontics": and Dr. Edward Dobbs. 
Professor of Pharmacology and Thera- 
peutics, speaking on "Antibiotics". 

The scientific presentations were fol- 
lowed by a dinner during which awards 
were presented to Dr. Harry B. Mc- 
Carthy. Dean of the Baylor Dental 
School at Dallas. Texas, and to Dean 
Emeritus of both the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery. Dental School. 
I niversit) of Maryland, and the West 
Virginia Dental School. Doctor J. Ben 
Robinson 

Dr. Gerard Devlin of Newark. 
N. J. was chairman of the Committee 
on Awards, and Dean Myron Aisen- 
berg addressed the dinner group. 




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30 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



I ho officers of the New Jersej 

Section are: 

Dr. Saul M. Gale, '22, President 
Dr. Joseph Martin, '34, President- 
gleet 

Dr. Alan A. Gale. '50, Vice-Presi- 
dcnl 

Dr. Samuel H. Byer. '27, Treasurer 
Dr. Robert H. Jernick, '50, Secre- 
t/ay ■ 

I u'l'I IV CHANGES IN THE 
DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

1 rank J. Sinnreich, Jr., Instructor in 
Anatomy, has resigned to undertake 
the study of Dentistry at the University 
of Maryland. During his five years in 
the department. Mr. Sinnreich has car- 
ried on research on "The Effects of 
Colchicine on the Erupting Rat In- 
cisors", which work is now in its com- 
pletion phase. His record as a teacher 
was outstanding. His efforts for 
thoroughness and improvement will be 
remembered by his former students and 
by his colleagues. We regret very 
much his absence from the Depart- 
ment; however we all wish him well in 
his new field of endeavor, feeling cer- 
tain that he will be successful. 

George W. Piavis, Ph.D. has been 
appointed Assistant Professor of 
Anatomy effective September 1, 1958. 
Graduated from Western Maryland 
College in 1952 with a Master of 
Education, he received his Ph.D. in 
1958 at Duke University, having 
majored in Zoology and Anatomy. He 
has served as a Science Teacher in 
several high schools also as a Zoology 
Instructor at Montgomery Junior Col- 
lege and as Graduate Assistant and 
Instructor in Comparative Anatomy, 
Zoology and Embryology at Duke 
University. Dr. Piavis was a Fishery 
Research Biologist with the Great 
Lakes Fishing Investigation, U. S. 
Fishery & Wild Life Service. He is a 
member of various educational and 
biological societies. Dr. Piavis is mar- 
ried and has a son. 



College of 

EDUCATION 



Betty Coleman 



NEW STAFF MEMBERS 

Dr. L. Morris McClure, the new 
Assistant Dean of the College of Edu- 
cation, comes to the University of 
Maryland from Western Michigan 
University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1958 




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where he \vas Director ol Student 
I eaching and Professor ol Education. 
He received his Bachelor's degree from 
Western Michigan University, his 
Master's degree from the University ol 
Michigan and his Doctor's degree from 
Michigan Slate University. Dr. Mc- 
Clure has served as a teacher, a princi- 
pal and a curriculum consultant on 
the staff of the Michigan State De- 
partment of Public Instruction. 

He is a leader in the field of teacher 
education, currently serving as National 
representative of the Association for 
Supervision and Curriculum Develop- 
ment on the Coordinating Committee 
on Problems of Teacher Education, a 
committee of the American Associa- 
tion for Colleges of Teacher Education 
which coordinates teacher education 
activities for all national organizations. 
He is also a member of the National 
Commission on Teacher Education of 
the Association for Supervision and 
Curriculum Development. In the sum- 
mer of 1957 Dr. McClure was Chair- 
man of the Planning Committee for 
the Student Teaching Clinic and Chair- 
man of the conference for the first 
national clinic on student teaching 
sponsored by the Association for 
Student Teaching. He has been active 
in the State of Michigan in various 
committees dealing with teacher educa- 
tion and certification. Among his 
many activities in the schools of Michi- 
gan he served as consultant to schools 
doing curriculum study. 

As Assistant Dean in the College of 
Education, Dr. McClure will be in 
charge of the program of teacher edu- 
cation and the coordination of student 
teaching in the College. 

He is married and has two children. 

Dr. Jean D. Grambs has been ap- 
pointed to the College of Education 
staff as Lecturer, part-time, in the field 
of secondary education. Dr. Grambs 
will teach courses in the general area 
of social studies education and super- 
vise student teachers in this field. Dr. 
Grambs holds a Bachelor's degree 
from Reed College and a Master's and 
Doctor's degree from Stanford Uni- 
versity. She was formerly a teacher 
in junior and senior high schools in 
California, a Research Assistant to the 
Educational Policies Commission of 
the NEA, Research Associate for the 
San Francisco Commonwealth Club 
Study of the Population of California 
and Research Director. Recreational 
Interests of Palo Alto Youth. For five 
years Dr. Grambs served as Instructor 
and Assistant Professor of Education 
at Stanford University. Since 1955 she 
has been Supervisor of Adult Educa- 



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32 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



tion in Prince Georges County. 

Dr. Grambs h.i^ published a number 
of articles dealing with intergroup 
education, educational sociology, 
teacher education and secondary educa- 
tion. She is co-author of the book 
Modern Methods in Secondary /.dura- 
tion recenth revised and co-editor ol 
an elemental - ) social studies textbook 

series. 

Dr. Grambs is married and has three 
children. 

Mrs. Helen L. Garstens joins our 
stall in the Junior High School Mathe- 
matics Project. She comes to us from 
the Arlington County Schools where 
she was Supervisor of Secondary 
Mathematics. Mrs. Garstens received 
her Bachelor's degree from Hunter 
College and has taken graduate work 
in mathematics at Columbia Uni- 
versity. In the past eight years she 
has taken courses at the University 
of Virginia and Georgetown Uni- 
versity. In 1958 Arlington selected 
Mrs. Garstens to receive a citation in 
recognition of outstanding teaching of 
mathematics, granted by the Joint 
Board of Science Education of the 
Washington Academy of Sciences. 

Mrs. Garstens has one child and 
lives in Arlington. Virginia. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION WORKSHOP 

A four-week summer program in spe- 
cial education, one of only a few be- 
tween New York and Georgia, closed 
its doors August 1 at Broad Acres 
Elementary School, Montgomery 
County. The Workshop was attended 
by 102 teachers of the handicapped 
from Maryland, the District, and three 
nearby states. 

At Broad Acres, the 102 classroom 
teachers and other special education 
personnel spent their days attending 
lectures by recognized authorities in 
the field, studying the problems and 
techniques of educating the retarded 
child, and observing professionals apply 
these techniques. Forty-five handi- 
capped children from Montgomery 
County attended the workshop in order 
that professionals could demonstrate 
their methods to student teachers. 

The summer program was started 
three years ago in Montgomery County 
with the University of Maryland taking 
a growing interest in it. Last year the 
University of Maryland took over the 
project after one year's participation by 
Syracuse University. Dr. Norris G. 
Haring, Associate Professor and 
Coordinator of Special Education at 
Maryland, was director of the work- 
shop. 

(Continued on next page) 



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1 he University oi Maryland chose 
five special education teachers from 
Montgomery County: Mrs. RozeUe 
Miller, Miss Gertrude Justinson, Mrs 
Louise Holley, Mrs Maryanne Brier 
and Mrs. Durkee. Dr. E. Paul Benoit. 
child psychologist Governor Bacon 
Health Center. Visiting Professor at the 
University ot Maryland, also taught a 
section at the workshop. 

Miss Suzanne Waters. Principal of 
Broad Acres Elementary School, 
directed the demonstration program of 
the mentally retarded, trainable and 
educable children during the workshop. 

IIKSI \NM AI I AMU V I IN WCE 
WORKSHOP 

The College of Business and Public 
Administration. College of Education, 
and the College of Home Economics. 
in cooperation with the National Com- 
mittee for Education in Family Finance 
and the Institute of Life Insurance, pre- 
sented the first annual University of 
Maryland Workshop on Education for 
Family Finance. June 23 to August 1. 
The six-week, six-credit summer labor- 
atory course was designed to help edu- 
cators furnish young people with bases 
upon which they can build sound habits 
of dealing with the financial problems 
of their business life. 

Thirty-six teachers and administra- 
tors were enrolled in the Workshop 
which was held on the College Park 
campus. Workshop participants repre- 
sented five states and the District of 
Columbia. 

Dr. Arthur S. Patrick. Professor and 
Head of the Department of Office 
Management and Techniques, and Dr. 
Robert G. Risinger. Associate Professor 
of Education, served as co-ordinators 
for the Workshop. University staff 
members, business and financial experts 
and government officials served as sub- 
ject matter lecturers and instructors. 
Content areas included in the Work- 
shop course of study were: insurance, 
pension plans, social security, home 
ownership. wills. estates. financial 
planning, savings, investments, banks 
and banking, consumer bming. taxa- 
tion, and credit. 

STUDENT NATIONAt EDUCATION 
ASSOCIATION ELECTS OFFICERS 

The following officers were recently 
elected for the Student National Educa- 
tion Association: 

President: Nancy Overton ot Uni- 
versity Park 

Vice President: Joyce Cox ol Arling- 
ton. Virginia 



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34 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Secretary: Virginia Stephens ol 

Chevj Chase 

Treasurer: Regina Mel can oi Balti- 
more 

An interesting program of events for 
the tall semester includes meetings 
organized around the theme of "De- 
partments in the College of Education." 
A meeting featuring Russian education 
is also planned. The state SNEA con- 
vention will be held in "low son in 
November. 

1958 EDUCATION GRADUATES 

Mrs. Margaret Lazzell Jackson is now 
teaching at University Park School, 
Hyattsville. Mrs. Marilyn Reber is 
teaching at Grecnbelt School. Green- 
belt. Mrs. Louise Martin Lewis and 
Mary Elizabeth Ellis are teaching at 
Thomas Stone Elementary School in 
Mt. Rainier. The following graduates 
are teaching in Montgomery County: 
Miss Charlotte Lucy at Broad Acres 
School, Miss Ann Longfellow, Wyn- 
gate School and Miss Abby Cohen at 
Rosemary Hills School. 

Mr. Wallace Bradley, a graduate in 
Industrial Education, is audio-visual 
laboratory instructor at San Diego 
State College, San Diego, California. 

Miss Beverly J. Silar is Business Edu- 
cation instructor at West York Senior 
High School, York, Pennsylvania, teach- 
ing second-year typewriting, shorthand, 
transcription and business English. 

Miss Silar received the 1958 Smead 
Professional Award for Outstanding 
Achievement in Business Education at 
the University of Maryland. The award 
is sponsored jointly by the Smead Man- 
ufacturing Company and the United 
Business Education Association, NEA 
and is presented with the hope that it 
will stimulate professional interest and 
development through active participa- 
tion by young business educators in pro- 
fessional organizations. 

CROSBY JOINS INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
STAFF 

Edmund D. Crosby, Assistant Professor 
of Industrial Education, is the newest 
addition to the Department's stafL Mr. 
Crosby earned his B.A. at the Western 
Michigan College of Education and his 
M.A. at Colorado A. & M. College. He 
is currently working on the final phases 
of study leading to a Doctor of Phil- 
osophy degree at the University of 
Michigan. 

Professor Crosby comes to the Uni- 

; versity of Maryland from the Teachers 

College at Chicago, Illinois, where he 

has been a teacher educator since 1955. 

(Continued on next page) 




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Rubber Tile 

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Phone OL. 2-2112 



TOWER 9-6204 : 



JIMMIE PORTER 
Trading as 

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A Complete Line of Beverages 

8200 Baltimore Blvd. College Park, Md. 



RESTORFF MOTORS 

Sales /VCl>d>/t> Service 

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COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



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Insurance of all Kinds 

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American Disinfectant Co. 




Pest Control Service 




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Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 8-6478 





NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



35 



RIVERVIEW COURTS 

On U. S. Route 50 — North of the Choptank River Bridge 
Opposite Cambridge, Maryland 



MAILING ADDRESS: 
TRAPPE, MARYLAND 



TELEPHONE: 
( IMBRIDGE 1903 



Television, Radios and Playground Available 

. LANDSCAPED GROUNDS 

. BACK FROM THE ROAD 

HUNTING, FISHING & SWIMMING AVAILABLE 



SALISBURY RUG COMPANY 



700 N. SALISBURY BLVD. 

Phone PI 2-1129 

Complete Line of 

RUGS and CARPETS 




SAL RY. MD. 



Carpet 




Installation 

Specialists 



Cleaning of 
Oriental and 
Domestic Rugs 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON, MD. 
Phone TA 2-3000 



CARL J. WILLIAMS & SONS 



CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 
918 Cooper St. • Salisbury, Maryland « 



PI 9-5444 




Salisbury Milling Co. 

Incorporated 

Salisbury's Best 

Broiler - Laying - Hog 

FEEDS 

Corn Goods - Eshelman Feeds 

Salisbury, Md. 



SWEETHEART 

ENRICHED BREAD 

IT'S DELICIOUS 

SALISBURY. MARYLAND 



36 



Prior to his working at Chicago. Mr. 
Crosby was a teacher at the University 
of Michigan Laboratory School and an 
instructor .it Iowa State leathers Col- 
lege, Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

Professor Crosby is a veteran of 
World War II having served as an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy. His 
public school experience includes ten 
sears in the secondary schools of Mich- 
igan and Missouri, part ot which was 
at the Edison Institute High School. 
Dearborn. Michigan. 

Mr. Crosby's new duties will include 
teaching laboratory and methods coursev 
His rich experience in the public schools 
and teacher-education institutions pro- 
vide him with an excellent background 
for his work at Maryland. 

\lr. Crosby is married and has a four- 
teen year old son. The Crosby's reside 
in Adelphi. Maryland. 

RESEARCH PROJECTS IN INDUSTRIAL 
EDUCATION 

Carl Schramm and George Champion 
are co-researchers on a project dealing 
with the implications of scientific and 
technological developments on Indus- 
trial Arts teaching, and the impact of 
such developments on teacher educa- 
tion. This project is under the direction 
of Dr. Paul E. Harrison. The project 
received financial assistance from the 
general research funds of the Univer- 
sity. 

Dr. William F. Tierney has recently 
completed a study of Industrial Educa- 
tion teacher needs in the State of Mary- 
land. 

Dr. Eckhart A. Jacobsen is currenth 
working on a research project dealing 
with Attitudinal Patterns in Group 
Learning Activity on the College level. 
This project was subsidized by funds 
from the general research board of the 
University. 

Dr. Paul E. Harrison has recently 
completed a study of teacher-recruit- 
ment practices in Industrial Arts teacher 
education institutions. 

Additional research projects are being 
developed along the lines of improved 
teaching methods as well as coordinated 
projects w ith public school teachers. 

DANFORTH SCHOLAR STUDIES IN 
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

George Champion. Instructor in the In- 
dustrial Arts Department at San Fran- 
cisco State College is a Danforth 
Scholar pursuing his doctoral studies in 
the Industrial Education Department. 



Ml RRll.L TAKES A YEAR OF STUDY 

George R. Merrill. Instructor in the I 
Industrial Education Department has 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



taken a year oil foi stud] towards tus 
doctoral degree, Mi Merrill has been 
with the Universitj since i t,s 4 and has 
served the Department with distinction 
in coordinating its "Work Experience" 
program. He also has organized and 
taught the "Automotives" classes in the 
Department as well as teaching the 
Machine shop" laboratory classes. 

\lr. Merrill is continuing his studies 
at the Universitj of Maryland majoring 
in History, Philosophy and Comparative 
Education. 

\t \1 1 'i PARTICIPATES IN A.V.A. 
MEETINGS 

Dr. Donald Maley. Professor and Head 
ol the Industrial Education Department 
was chairman of the joint Industrial 
Arts and National Association of In- 
dustrial Teacher Educators meeting 
held at Buffalo. New York. The meet- 
ing was a part of the American Voca- 
tional Association's annual convention. 
The theme of the meeting was "Mod- 
ern Technology and Industrial Educa- 
tion" and was attended by Industrial 
Arts teachers and leading industrial 
teacher educators from throughout the 
nation. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION ESTABLISHES 
GRADUATE CENTER 

Full-time graduate students in the In- 
dustrial Education Department have 
recently acquired a home base for 
study, discussion and planning. Parti- 
tions have been erected in P300 within 
which study tables, chairs, filing cabi- 
nets, typing facilities, book shelves, and 
drawing facilities are being located to 
provide the Department's graduate stu- 
dents with an atmosphere conducive 
to good graduate study. 

DR. TIERNEY ATTENDS GRAPHIC ARTS 
MEETING 

Dr. William F. Tierney, Associate Pro- 
fessor of the Industrial Education De- 
partment, College of Education, at- 
tended the 33rd Annual Conference 
of the International Graphic Arts Edu- 
cation Association held at Stout State 
College. Menomonie, Wisconsin, August 
3 to 8. The theme of the conference 
.was "New Trends in Graphic Arts In- 
dustry and Education" and a special 
feature of the meeting was a series of 
workshops in offset lithography. 

Dr. Tierney reported on the progress 
of the Association's Graphic Arts Lab- 
oratory Planning and Advisory Com- 
mittee of which he is chairman. This 
, committee assists school administrators 
in planning graphic arts programs and 
t laboratory facilities for secondary 
^schools throughout the country. Dr. 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 





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POCOMOKE CITY 
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REALTY 
COMPANY 



BARTLETT 

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GMC TRUCKS 

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Telephones 255 • 455 - 655 

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The COHN & BOCK CO. 

Lumber • Building Material 

poultry FEEDS livestock 

PRINCESS ANNE. MARYLAND 



37 




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THE 

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SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



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SALISBURY, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONE PI 9-5594 



BANK OF CRISFIELD 

Dependable Service Since 1893 

MARION BRANCH— Phone 2381 

UPTOWN BRANCH— Phone 312 

MAIN OFFICE— Phone 102 

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MARYLAND Magazine 



1 1 erne y was named a Regional Vice 
President of the Association at the 

annual meeting. 

AUTHORS BOOK 

Anne Guy, an elemental") school 
teacher in Chev) Chase, Maryland, and 
a graduate of the University, has 

authored her third book. Cub Scout 
Donny. I he book is published by 
Abingdon Press. Her first two books 
are Bain for Betsy and Book of Tails. 
The story of Donn\ as a Cub Scout 
is reminiscent of the experiences of 
many boys who join the Scouts. He 
learned to work and plaj with boys 
his age while putting into practice the 
motto "A Cub Scout gives good will." 

sll\l I NER APPOINTED TO NEW POST 

Robert S. Shaffner. who holds a B.A. 
and an Mid. from the University, uas 
recently nominated for the newl) 
created post of Director of Personnel 
in the Anne Arundel county school 
system. He has been supervisor of 
county elementary schools since 1954. 
Mr. Shaffner is present!) studying 
for his doctorate at the University of 
Mar) land. 

NEWS FROM THE ORTEL FAMILY 

Ortel is their name, and three of them 
are graduates of the University: Margo, 
'50; Carol Lee. '51; and Howard Da\id. 
'53. Howard, a flight instructor at Mc- 
Connell Air Force Base. Wichita. Kan- 
sas, is one of the most highly respected 
young officers there. Carol Lee is pres- 
ently teaching school in Colorado. 

The most exciting news to date con- 
cerns Margo. Married to Jean F. Estes. 
she makes her home in Clairmont. Cali- 
fornia. Both are doing graduate work 
at Pomona College: Jean is a candidate 
tor a master's degree in education. 

As part of his work for the master's 
degree. Jean wrote a thesis about Greek 
mythology. The faculty at Pomona be- 
came interested in expanding this work 
for use in teaching children about 
Greek mythology. Consequently. RCA 
has recorded some of these myths, and 
accompanying the LP album is an illus- 
trated script. Jean narrates the tales 
and his wife, a competent artist, illus- 
trated the accompanying script. Side 
one tells the stories of Echo. Narcissus. 
Philemon and Baucis, and Arachne. 
Side two relates the adventures of 
Perseus. 

Jean feels that children benefit con- 
siderably from this album inasmuch as 
it helps lay a background in literature. 
poetry, and art. Adults benefit from 
the album b) gaining a new insight into 
the mind of Western man and into the 



problems of man in general. 

Dr. Robert B. Palmer, Associate Pro- 
fessor ol (lassies at Scripps College de- 
scribes the album: "It is this quality 
(simplicity) which Jean Estes has 
brought over unusually well in his re- 
telling of those age-old stories. Like 
any good story-teller, he follows the 
main thread of the story as it has been 
handed down to him. but like an> story- 
teller worth his salt, he has seen fit to 
deal freely with some of the minor 
embellishments of the tales he tells." 

Distributed on the West Coast, 
'"Greek Myths tor Children." told by 
Jean Estes. has met with wide SU< 
and is being used in the schools there. 
National distribution is anticipated. 
Anyone who is interested in receiving 
the album can contact Jean Estes at 660 
Colorado Street. Claremont. California. 
I he price is $4.40 postpaid. 



College of 

ENGINEERING 

A . Bernard Eyler 



CHARI ! s FE1 i<>\ 
Charles W. Felton. Jr.. M. E. '37. was 
recend) made Assistant Superintendent 
of Blast Furnaces at the Lackawanna, 
New York, plant of Bethlehem Steel 
Company. 

On completing Bethlehem's Loop 
Course for college graduates in 1937J 
Mr. Felton was assigned to the Blast 
Furnace Department at Lackawanna. 
He became Assistant Turn Foreman in 
1941 and Assistant to Superintendent in 
1945. 

He is a member of the Association of 
Iron and Steel Engineers. 




38 



Mr. felton 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



WHEN LAST HEARD I ROM 

Charles L. Armentrout, Jr., '4S, with 
Washington Suburban Sanitary Com- 
mission as Somor Designing Engineer, 

H. S. Berlin, 'l l >. with Consulting 
firm in Galveston, I exas 

R. R. Brannan, '50, with Anchor Post 
Products, Inc., Vice President in charge 

Ol sales. 

J. E. Breen, '54, employed as a metal- 
lurgist with Raytheon Manufacturing 
Co. 

(.'. R. Dillon. '52, Supervisory Me- 
chanical Engineer Chief, Engineering 

Branch. Installation Engineering Office 
A A F B. 

R. A. Dunnigan. '35, Equipment En- 
gineer for D. C. Transit System. Inc., 
Washington. D. C. 

W. J. Eser. Jr.. '56. Field Engineer 
for Koppers Co., Baltimore. 

\I. C. Fuchs. '54. with Westinghouse 
Electric Co., Baltimore, as Design Engi- 
neer. 

R. A. Harding. Jr.. '43. Bendix Radio 
Division of Bendix Aviation Corpora- 
tion. Baltimore, as Principal Mechanical 
Engineer. 

G. W. Longanecker, '54 B.S.— '55 
M.S.. Design Engineer with Nuclear 
Products ERCO Division. A.C.F. In- 
dustries. Inc., Hyattsville, Maryland. 

F. S. Mueller, Jr., '57, Engineering 
Foreman with N. H. German & Bros., 
Inc.. of Reading. Pennsylvania. 

C. W. McClellard, '51, Senior Elec- 
trical Engineer. Project Engineer, West- 
inghouse Electric Corporation Air Arm 
Division. 

R. P. Quigley, '57, Research Assist- 
ant, Allegheny Ballistics Laboratory, 
Cumberland, Maryland. 

Tom Shaffer, '38, Chief Systems En- 
gineering Nuclear Products Division 
ACF Industries, Washington, D. C. 
(Continued on next page) 



# # # 

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TO THE 
MARYLAND 
MAGAZINE 



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Massers Motel & Restaurant 

Maryland's Outstanding 

OTEL 

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Crown Oil & Wax Co. 


Distributors 


Shell Petroleum Products 


Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 


FREDERICK, MD. 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 
Every kind of Insurance 

110 W. Patrick St. Frederick, Md. 



NORMAN S. 

EARLEY & SON 

General Contractors 
and Builders 

Plants — Homes — Stores 
Public Buildings 
435 E. BALTIMORE ST. 
Hagerstown, Maryland 



CLASS 1947 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



39 



diss I! ni Hi i' r\ k ID. 



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BLADENSBURG, MD 



Jfuller & fc'aibert 

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SUPPLYING 

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536 W. PRATT ST., SArotoga 7-4446 



I L Shelton. '2H. Director. Patent 
Section United Aircraft Corporation. 

R. L Sima. '51. Senior Engineer, 
Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Bal- 
timore. 

E. A. Stallings. '57. Civil Engineer in 
training program with Army Engineers. 
Baltimore. 

G. H. Storrs. '40. Electrical Group 
Engineer for the Martin Company, Bal- 
timore. 

S. F. Vizzini. '51, Vice President of 
Philip Vizzini & Son. Inc.. of Baltimore. 

C. A. Weigel. Jr.. '50. Patent Attor- 
ne\ for Radio Corporation of America. 

T. W. Wilson. '34. Partner in lau 
firm of Dow. Lohnes. and Albertson. 

E. C. Wood. '56. Flight Test Engi- 
neer for Boeing Airplane Company. 
Seattle. Washington. 

J. A. Yienger. '57. Associate Engi- 
neer with the Martin Company, of Bal- 
timore. 



College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 



Mrs. June Wilbur 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

Careful faculty-student preparations in- 
sured a successful Career Day in the 
College of Home Economics building 
on Friday. November 14. Sharing ex- 
hibits and demonstrations with the De- 
partments of Foods and Nutrition. Tex- 
tiles and Clothing. Practical Art. Home 
and Institution Management and Home 
Economics Education was the Home 
Economics Extension Service of the 
State. 

Dean Selma Eippeatt with Miss Mar- 
garet Oliver. Head of Home Economics 
Extension, prepared a tape-recording on 
Home Economics careers to be used 
throughout the state b\ Agriculture Ex- 
tension Information Service. 

Students from Indonesia. India. Thai- 
land. Egypt. Iraq and China are pres- 
ently enrolled in courses in Home Eco- 
nomics. 

All freshmen in the College are par- 
ticipating in escorted tours of the library 
with a view to making the most effec- 
tive use of the library. 

Professor Faye Mitchell and Dr. 
Jewell Golden represented the college 
at a meeting October 1-3 at Cornell 
University. The Technical Committee 
for Research in Textiles and Clothing 
of the Land Grant Association met to 
design plans for continued, cooperative 
research. 



Student s Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 




Alurnni 
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COMBINED STUDIOS 

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ACADEMY PICTURES 

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FLOOR TREATMENT 

R. E. Rub'i. Divisional Mgr. 

8008 Piney Branch Road 



JUniper 5-3957 



Silver Spring, Md. 



40 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



facqueline I ads, President of the stu- 
denl Home Economics Club, has been 
asked to consult with the American 
Home Economics Association Public 
Relations Chairman on photographic 
illustrations for a recruiting article ap- 
pealing m the December issue of the 
Journal of Home Economics. 



School of 

LAW 

Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



JUDGE OGLE MARBURY ENJOYING 
EARNED LEISURE 

Ogle Marbury, Law '04, who. after 48 
years as lawyer and judge in the state 
of Maryland retired in 1952, is en- 
joying well-earned leisure at his home 
in Laurel, Maryland. 

Marbury began his career in law by 
opening law offices in Laurel and Balti- 
more as soon as he graduated from 
Law School. Six years later, in 1910, 
he was elected to the first of two terms 
in the Maryland legislature. He was 
the Democratic Party Floor Leader in 
the House of Delegates during his 
second term. 

Although Mr. Marbury has held a 
number of public offices, he is best 
known for his work as a judge on the 
Maryland Court of Appeals, to which 
he was appointed in 1941. He rose to 
the position of Chief Judge of that 
judicial body, being appointed in 1944 
by Herbert R. O'Connor, then Gov- 
ernor of Maryland. The position is the 
highest judicial post in the state. 

From the time of his appointment 
until his retirement in 1952 at the age 
of 70 (compulsory retirement age 
according to the state constitution) 
Judge Marbury wrote 305 opinions 
and reorganized the entire judicial 
system of the state. 

The Laurel News Leader in a recent 
article about Judge Marbury, hailed 
him as "Laurel's most eminent citizen." 
The Maryland Magazine salutes him 
as one of the University's most out- 
standing alumni. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



PHYSICAL THERAPY'S FIRST 
GRADUATING CLASS 

Commencement Exercises for the Uni- 
versity's first graduating class in Phys- 
(Continued on next page) 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



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SEVEN CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 

John M. Conroy 



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Repairs - Remodeling 



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ical Therapy were held August 29 in 
the Gra> Laboratory Building. Balti- 
more. 

Guest speaker for the exercise was 
Dr. Albin O. Kuhn. Executive Vice 
President ot the University. 

The Ph\sical Therapj professional 
curriculum was established in Septem- 
ber. 1956 and has been approved b\ the 
American Medical Association. 

SPEAKS IN I ondon 
Dr. John Z. Bowers. '38, who is pres- 
ently Dean of the Universitj of Wiscon- 
sin Medical School was in London 
September 25 and 26 to address the 
British Association for the Study of 
Medical Education. He discussed "A 
Study of Medical Education in the 
United States ." 

Dr. Bowers also visited medical 
schools in the United Kingdom, a trip 
sponsored by the Rockefeller Founda- 
tion. 

CLASS OF 1928 CELEBRATES 30TH 
REUNION IN GRAND STYLE 

The Class of 1928 gathered in force 
for the celebration of its 30th reunion. 
Aside from the activities centering 
around Alumni Day on June 5. a 
scientific session and banquet were 
planned for June 6. On June 7 mem- 
bers of the class were the guests of Dr. 
Jack J. Singer at his home. 

Members of the class participating in 
the activities included the following: 
Hugh A. Bailey. William A. Berger. 
Simon Brager. George A. Duncan. Ber- 
nard Friedman. Aaron I. Grollman. 
Lewis P. Gundry. Samuel J. Hankin. 
H. Alvan Jones. Nathan H. Kotch. 
Jacob Lamstein. Joseph C. Laukaitis. 
Morris Lerner. 

Maurice Levinsky. Earl F. Limbach. 
Luther E. Little. Isadore B. Lyon. Rob- 
ert S. McCeney. John Mace. Jr.. Vin- 
cent M. Maddi. Aaron Meister. Frank 
A. Merlino. Ralph Mostwill. Roy H. 
McDowell. Peter Pileggi. Benjamin S. 
Rich. Frederick T. Zimmerman. 

H\man S. Rubenstein. Morris H. Saf- 
fron. Robert Sardo. A. A. Silver. Jack 
J. Singer. Merrill C. Smoot. Theodore 
Stacy. S. Zachar\ VogeL C. Gardner 
Warner. Fred S. W'eintraub. Aaron 
Weiss, Albert W ilkerson. Oscar D. Yar- 
borough. 

I 1 I M 

Dr. Zekin Andrew Shakhashiri of the 
American Universin of Beirut. Leba- 
non, was ,i recent visitor to the campus 
of the School of Medicine. Dr. Shak- 
hashiri's father received his degree of 
Doctor of Medicine from the University 
ot Maryland in 1909. 



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42 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



DR. SMI 111 I 1 Kill II I) 

Lt. Col. E. P. Smith. Jr., *46 has re- 
cently been certified bj the American 
Board of Surgery and the American 
Board of Thoracic Surgery. Or. Smith, 
who is currently stationed at the Scott 
Air Force Base Hospital. Illinois, is 
also a member of the Southern Thoracic 
Surgical Association and a Fellow of 
the American College of Surgeons. Dr. 
Smith is currently Chief of the Surgical 
Service and the Thoracic Surgery Serv- 
ice of the Scott AFB Hospital. 

DK. BOSSARD It) INDIANA 

Dr. John W. Bossard, '51, who has 

completed his training in neurologic sur- 
gerj at the Mayo Foundation in Ro- 
chester. Minnesota, has entered the 
practice of neurologic surgery in Fort 
Wayne, Indiana. 

DR. GEORGE ENTWISTLE APPOINTED 

PROFESSOR OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

AND REHABILITATION 

Dr. George Entvvistle, formerly Assist- 
ant Professor of Medicine in the School 
of Medicine, was recently named Pro- 
fessor of Preventive Medicine and Re- 
habilitation, succeeding Dr. Maurice C. 
Pincoffs who recently retired. 

A native of England, Dr. Entwistle 
received his collegiate education at the 
University of Massachusetts and his 
Doctor of Medicine degree from Boston 
University in 1948. He served his in- 
ternship at the Massachusetts Memorial 
Hospital following which he was ap- 
pointed a Fellow in the Boston Univer- 
sity Department of Physiology, being 
promoted to Fellow in Medicine and 
Lecturer in Physiology in 1950. 

Between 1951 and 1955 he held an 
assistant residency and later residency 
at the Evans Memorial Hospital in 
Massachusetts and was Instructor in 
Medicine at the Boston University 
School of Medicine. In 1956 he ac- 
cepted his appointment at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland and has since served 
actively in the Department of Medi- 
cine's Outpatient Clinic. 

MR. WILLIAM G. HARNE HONORED BY 
UNIVERSITY FOR MERITORIOUS SERVICE 

Special service awards for persons asso- 
ciated with the University's Baltimore 
Campus for ten years or more were 

.presented at a ceremony on July 23. 

■1958. 

Included among the 46 members of 
the Medical School and Hospital staffs 

;who received awards was Mr. William 
G. Harne, a member of the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacology, School of Med- 
icine, whose 35 years of continuous 
(Continued on next page) 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1958 



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Baltimore, Md. 



AMERICAN 

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COMPLETE LINE OF 

DESKS, CHAIRS. 

FILING CABINETS 

SAFES 

ROOM AIR CONDITIONERS 
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43 



Clifton D. Mayhew 

Painting S Decorating 
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^exvina itudenti and 
alumni or tne 
UM.Luexs.ihj or 

<s; I [aruiand 



1-1 U£an 



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head or both, eomhanies. 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 




service were acknowledged by Dr. Wil- 
son H. Elkins who presented the 
awards at a ceremony held in the Uni- 
versity Hospital. 

\l UMNI AT S.M.A. CONV1 Mins 

On the occasion of the 1958 session of 
the Southern Medical Association held 
in New Orleans. November 3-6. 1 958. 
the Medical Alumni Association spon- 
sored an Alumni Reunion, this time 
under the direction of Dr. Caesar F. 
Orofino of the Ochsner Clinic. New 
Orleans. 

Those who attended the 1957 Session 
of the Southern Medical Association 
held in Miami Beach will remember the 
most successful reception held on that 
occasion. This year a buffet supper was 
planned lor the evening of November 4 
at the Roosevelt Hotel. 

DR. MC WD I I VMS ELECTED 

Dr. Clarence McWilliams. Jr.. '46. has 
recently been elected President of the 
Baltimore County Medical Association. 
Dr. McWilliams is engaged in general 
practice in Reisterstown. Maryland. 

RECEIVES IMPORTANT INDUSTRIAL 
MEDICAL APPOINTMENT 

Dr. Isadore Kaplan. "37. has been 
named Medical and Surgical Director 
of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
with system jurisdiction. Dr. Kaplan 
succeeds Dr. Samuel M. English who 
retired July 1. 1958. 

Born in Baltimore in 1912. Dr. Kap- 
lan received his degree of Doctor of 
Medicine from the University of Mary- 
land in 1937. and practiced industrial 
medicine in Central City. Pennsylvania, 
for three years. From 1941 to 1945 he 
served on active duty with the 29th 
Division (Maryland National Guard I. 
as an officer of the 104th Medical Bat- 
talion in the European Theater. 

Following World War II he joined 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's 
Medical and Surgical Department as 
Assistant Medical Examiner and was 
appointed medical examiner in Julv. 
[951. 

The department he now heads has as 
its chief function the medical examina- 
tion of applicants for emplovment and 
for health, accident and life insurance 
examinations under the Railroad's Relief 
Department: the examination, care or 
referral of employees injured on dutv : 
and overall responsibility for the health 
and hygiene of the railroad's emploveev. 

Dr. Kaplan is an authority on preven- 
tive techniques in industrial medicine 



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44 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



and is expected to carry out a plan foi 
furthei centralization ol the st atl ol the 
Railroad's medical examiners. 

Dr. Kaplan is the author ol an aiti 
clc entitled "Medico-1 egal Problems ol 
Industrial Medicine" winch will shortly 
be published in the journal, Industrial 
Medicine and Surgery. 

He is a member of the American 
Medical Association. Industrial Medical 
Association. Baltimore Citj Medical So- 
ciety. Medical and Chirurgical Faculty 
ol Maryland and the 29th Division As- 
sociation, of which he is a past national 
surgeon. 



School of 

NURSING 



Mrs. Lillie B. Largey 



NOTES FROM THE ALUMNI 

Miss Margaret A. Stephens is enrolled 
in the graduate school at the University 
of Texas and hopes to fulfill the require- 
ments for a master's in nursing by 
August 30. 1958. 

Miss Mary Wu, Miss Barbara Peter- 
son, and Miss Joan White are attending 
graduate school at Emory University, 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

Mrs. Jane Henderson, '27, is current- 
ly employed by a pediatrician and is 
doing office nursing. She resides in La 
Mesa, California. 

Mrs. David Gaver Venezky, '51, 
states that her husband is nearing the 
completion of requirement for his Ph.D. 
and he will be teaching chemistry at 
•the University of North Carolina for 
the next school year. 

Mrs. Phyllis Booth McClintook, '53. 
is now residing in Ozark, Alabama. 

Mrs. Jean Elmore Yancey, '53, is re- 
siding in Petersburg, Virginia, where 
she is employed by the Petersburg 
Health Department as a tuberculosis 
nurse. Her daughter Maria Kaye was 
one year old on August 21, 1958. 

Mrs. Nellie Pardew Connelly, '55. 
who has been in French Morocco with 
her husband for two years while he was 
in the USAF, is due to return to the 
states. After visiting in Baltimore, she 
and her husband will be living near 
Boston where he will set up his den- 
tistry practice. 

Mrs. Virginia Speer Thorson, '55, is 
now living in Illinois and working in a 
private clinic there. She is continuing 
her education in the evenings. 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



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Miss Joan Ritzman, '54. is now a 1st 
Lt. in the USAF. She recently returned 
from the Island of Crete and is now at 
Scotts Air Force Base in Illinois. 

Miss Kitty Yingling, '54, is a 1st Lt. 
in the USAF and has recently returned 
from Saudi Arabia. She is now sta- 
tioned at Andrews Air Force Base. 
Maryland. 

Mrs. Jean Hauver Jaliel. '54. is living 
in Bagdad with her husband and two 
children. She has been there for a year. 

Mrs. Georgia Crawford Ramsey, '54, 
is now in Montana with her husband 
and two children. 

Miss Marlene Reid. '54, sailed for 
London in May and is going to visit 
her sister in Naples before returning. 
She plans to attend Catholic University 
in the fall. 

Miss Margaret Richardson. '54. is 
now serving in the USAF in Japan. 

Miss Patricia Shanahan. '56, has re- 
cently completed a tour of Europe. 
She is presently Head Nurse of the 
Psychosomatic Ward at University Hos- 
pital. Maryland. 



School of 

PHARMACY 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 
SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS ANNOUNCED 

Dean Foss announced that twenty-three 
students were awarded scholarships by 
the School of Pharmacy for this com- 
ing school year. This group of students 
included eight in the freshman class, 
six in the sophomore class, five in the 
junior class, and four in the senior class. 
The recipients and donors of the schol- 
arships awarded are listed below: 



RECIPIENT 



SCHOLARSHIP 
PROVIDED BY 



Freshmen 
louis gubinsky 

Read's Drug Stores' 

SYDNEY H. HAMET 

Read's Drug Stores' 
ROBERT R. KANTORSKI 

Reads Drug Stores' 

BARRY LOS1NSKY 

Read's Drug Stores' 

WALTER P. MACKAY 

A hi run i A ssociation . 
macy 

SOL ROSENSTEIN 

Read's Drug Stores' 



Foundation. Inc. 
Foundation. Inc. 
Foundation. Inc. 
Foundation. Inc. 
School of Phar- 

Foundation. Inc. 




Sometimes 
you have to 
hold on 



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cause she was born with a mal- 
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work very well. The March of 
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defects and by polio and arthri- 
tis. They all need your help. 



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SARATOGA CHIPS 

distributed by 

BON TON SARATOGA 

CHIP DISTRIBUTORS 

Rear— 122? D St.. S.E. 

LI. 3-4848 Waskinqton 




46 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



I 1 1/ Mil 111 SCHMIDT 

Reacts Drug Stores' Foundation, Inc. 

GORDON STEVENSON 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

Sophomores 
une ENG 

Carroll Chemical Co. 

SVH 1 1AM J. HI INR1CH 

Noxzema Foundation, Inc. 

OIS LEE 
Lichtenstein Scholarship Fund 

HARVEY REISENWEBER 

Alumni Association. School of Phar- 
macy 

WTO TINELLI 

Greater University Fund Scholarship 

IEORGE W. WEAVER 

Alumni Association. School of Phar- 
macy 

UNIORS 
RONALD GOLDNER 

American Foundation for Pharma- 
ceutical Education 

MORTON D. RICHMAN 

Read's Drug Stores' Foundation. Inc. 
°ETER SCALI 

Read's Drug Stores' Foundation, Inc. 

MARTIN C. SHARGEL 

Read's Drug Stores' Foundation. Inc. 
U.BERT H. WARFIELD 

Read's Drug Stores' Foundation. Inc. 

(Seniors 

john w. becker 

Read's Drug Stores' Foundation, Inc. 
_ARRY H. POZANEK 

American Foundation for Pharma- 
ceutical Education 

HERBERT L. SACHS 

Read's Drug Stores' Foundation, Inc. 

iORELL SCHWARTZ 

Read's Drug Stores' Foundation, Inc. 
UNKNOWNS RECORD SONG 

ry Pozanek, Marvin Saiontz, Carl 
apian, and Allen Hanenbaum, seniors 
the School of Pharmacy, plus Char- 
naine Saiontz, a sister of Marvin 
Saiontz, recorded two songs last sum- 
Tier for Felsted, a subsidiary of Mun- 
ien Records. The vocal group under 
he name of "The Unknowns" has be- 
:ome quite well known in the Baltimore 
irea through appearances on radio, tele- 
vision and a number of record hops. 
Their recordings are entitled "O-oh 
Summer Love," and "Cool Wool," and 
vere written by Pozanek and Saiontz. 
The record was released in August in 
;he Baltimore-Washington, D. C. area, 
ind was released nationally the fourth 
veek of September. Cash Box Maga- 
zine rates these songs as "B" and stated, 
(Continued on next page) 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



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DEMONSTRATION IN MICROBIOLOGY 

Dr. Donald E. Shay. Professor of Mi- 
crobiology, is using closed circuit TV 
for demonstration in microbiology. 
I luce monitors are used and the stu- 
dent is able to observe demonstrations 
that would be difficult for him to see 
without this equipment. I he camera is 
equipped with a special lens which al- 
lows close-ups of quite small objects. 
A petri dish, for example, may be 
blown up to the size of the screen on 
the monitor. The students have been 
very receptive to this teaching aid. and 
Dr. Shay feels that the use of closed 
circuit TV has been a real success. 

DR. ARIENS VISITS SCHOOL OF 
PHARMACY 

Dr. B. J. Ariens visited the School of 
Pharmacy this month and presented 
two pharmaceutical chemistry colloquia. 
The titles of his talks were. "Affinity 
and Intrinsic Activity in Medicinal 
Chemistry," and "Three Basic Types of 
Curariform Drugs." Dr. Ariens has re- 
ceived a B.S. in chemistry. Ph.D. in 
medicinal chemistry, and an M.D. For 
several years he has been Professor and 
Chairman of the Department of Phar- 
macology at Nijmegan University. Dr. 
Ariens is a world authority on drug 
antagonism and synergism, and has con- 
tributed much to the understanding of 
the interplay of drug receptors and of 
the action of drugs on the molecular 
level. Because of his outstanding re- 
search, he was one of the two foreign 
speakers at the Gordon Research Con- 
ference on Medicinal Chemistry invited 
to their last conference. 

DR. SHANGRAW JOINS FACULTY 

Dr. Ralph F. Shangraw'. a recent grad- 
uate of the University of Michigan, has 
joined the stall" of the Pharmacy De- 
partment. Dr. Shangraw received his 
B.S. in pharmacy in 1952 at the Mas- 
sachusetts College of Pharmacy, he 
graduated with honors, and was elected 
to Rho Chi. the pharmacy honorary so- 
ciety. He then enrolled at the Univer- 
sit\ of Michigan, receiving an M.S. in 
pharmaceutical chemistry in 1954 and 
Ph.D. in pharmaceutical chemistry in 
1958. While at the University of Mich- 
igan he studied under Dr. Mattocks 
who had received his Ph.D. in 1943 in 




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48 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



pharmaceutical chemistr) at the Univei 
sity oi Maryland. I lie title oJ l>i 
Shangraw's Ph.D. thesis was "Rheologj 
of Methylcellulose Solutions." 

Methylcellulose is used as a thicken- 
ing and suspending agent in main phar- 
maceutical products such as tooth paste, 
hand lotions, hand creams, eye solu- 
tions, vitamin preparations, etc Dr. 
Shangraw's stud) has contributed much 
to the understanding of the fundamental 
property of methylcellulose which makes 
it so useful in these pharmaceutical 
products. The information gained from 
these basic studies will help make pos- 
sible the preparation of more stable 
pharmaceutical products and the design 
Of new and more efficacious products 
which the pharmacist refers to as "dos- 
age forms." 

Dr. Shangraw will teach dispensing 
pharmacy and history of pharmacy to 
juniors in the School of Pharmacy and 
will continue to carry out fundamental 
research on pharmaceutical formula- 
tions. 



FORMER FACULTY MEMBER AND 

STUDENT APPOINTED SECRETARY OF THE 

BOARD OF PHARMACY IN WISCONSIN 

Mr. Paul A. Pumpian, B.S. (Arts and 
Science) 1958, B.S. (Pharmacy) 1950, 
LL.B. 1953. has been appointed Secre- 
tary of the Board of Pharmacy in Wis- 
consin. Mr. Pumpian was most recently 




Mr. Pumpian 

Patent Attorney for E. R. Squibb Divi- 
sion of Mathieson Chemical Corpora- 
tion and assumed the position of Ad- 
ministrative Assistant to the Secretary 
on November 1, 1958. He will succeed 
to the office of Secretary on January 1, 
1959. Mr. Pumpian served as Assistant 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 




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Professor ol Pharmacy Administration 
in the School of Pharmac\. Universit) 
ol Maryland, as lecturer in Dental 
Jurisprudence at the School of Den- 
tistrv. and as Lecturer in Pharmaceu- 
tical Jurisprudence at Rutgers College 
of Pharmac\ . 

He is a member of the Rho Chi 
Pharmaceutical Honor Society, the 
American Bar Association, the New 
Jersej Patent Law Association. Ameri- 
can Societ) of Hospital Pharmacists: 
and is currently serving as First Vice 
President of the American Association 
ol Colleges Of Pharmacy. 

DR. KRAN 1/ 

Dr. John C. Krantz. Jr.. Med. '28, was 
featured as "Our Prominent Alumnus" 
in the August. 1958. issue of the 
Communicator, the official publication 
of the Phi Delta Chi Professional 
Pharmaceutical Fraternitv 

\ 1SITORS TO SCHOOL 

The School of Pharmacy has recently 
had two foreign visitors. Dr. Boguslaw 
Bobranski. Professor of Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry at the Medical Academ>. 
Wroclaw 1 2. Poland, and President of 
that institution, spent a day visiting the 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry Department. 
He was very much impressed by much 
of the equipment in use in American 
universities. He stated that only equip- 
ment such as balances which are manu- 
factured in eastern Europe are avail- 
able to them. His country. Poland, is 
quite poor economically and unable to 
purchase laboratory equipment from 
outside the Iron Curtain countries. 

Mr. Nosart Jerbi. a pharmacy grad- 
uate of the University of Rome, and the 
son of the Ambassador from Libya to 
this country, visited the School of 
Pharmacy. He stated that pharmaceu- 
tical education as evidenced at the Uni- 
\ersity of Maryland is far more ad- 
vanced than similar education in 
southern Europe. 

\1lss Gl I IINGER ELECTED TO SORORIIY 

Miss Georgianna S. Gittinger. Instructor 
in Pharmacology was elected to honor- 
ary membership in the Epsilon Chapter 
of Lambda Kappa Sigma, collegiate 
branch, and was installed along with the 
collegiate pledges. This is one of the 
sororities dedicated to pharmac\ . 

I UllTi 1'RI M N 1 \I IONS 

Dr. Robert Stolow recentl) spoke at a 
Chemistrx Colloquium in the Depart- 
ment o\ Pharmaceutical Chemistr\. Dr. 
Stolow in a research chemist at the 
Arms Chemical Center. The title of his 
talk was "Conformation and AciditV oi 



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50 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acids." 

Dr. Arnold H. Beckett, one of the 
WOrld's leading pharmaceutical chem- 
ists, presented two lectures at colloquia 

held in the Pharamceutical Chemist i\ 
Department. His lectures were entitled. 
"Chelation and Antibacterial Activity," 
and "Stereochemical Considerations of 
the Design and Mechanism of Action 
of Synthetic Analgesics." In addition. 
Dr. Beckett spoke to the undergraduate 
pharmacy students on "Pharmacy in 
England." Dr. Beckett was engaged in 
wartime research for the British Ad- 
miralty during the Second World War. 
After the war he taught at the Univer- 
sity of I ondon until 1950. and com- 
pleted his studies towards his Ph.D. de- 
gree. Since then he has taught pharma- 
ceutical chemistry and developed one 
of Europe's largest pharmaceutical 
chemistry research programs at the 
Chelsea School of Pharmacy, Chelsea 
t ollege of Science and Technology, 
London. He has developed a theory 
to explain how analgesic drugs relieve 
pain and has used this theory as a guide 
in preparing the most powerful drugs 
of this type known to man. Addition- 
ally, he has uncovered much new in- 
formation as to the mechanism by 
which certain drugs are able to kill 
bacteria. These discoveries could lead 
to some of the most powerful anti- 
bacterial drugs man has ever known. 
Dr. Beckett is of such stature that the 
medicinal chemistry section of the 
American Chemical Society paid his 
expenses to fly him from London, Eng- 
land, to Madison, Wisconsin, to give a 
45-minute talk at a Medicinal Chemis- 
try Symposium. The School of Phar- 
macy considers itself fortunate to have 
had such a man as a guest for three 
days. 

Dr. Francis M. Miller, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, School of Phar- 
macy, and Myron Weinberg have recent- 
ly presented a paper at a meeting in 
miniature of the American Chemical 
Society. The title of their paper was 
"Synthesis of 2-Phenylbicycle-(2:2: 1 )-2. 
5-heptadiene. A Novel Diels Older Re- 
action." 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos, Associate 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 
and Dr. Chien Li Huang also presented 
a paper. "Synthesis of 4-aza-3-chole- 
stanone and 4-aza-3-coprostanone." 

DR. GRECO APPOINTED DEAN 

Dr. Salvatore J. Greco was recently ap- 
pointed Dean of the Creighton Univer- 
sity School of Pharmacy. His appoint- 
ment became effective July 1st. Dr. 
j Greco received his Ph.D. in the Univer- 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 






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Mt> oi Maryland School ol Pharmacy 
in 1948. He has been at Creightoo 
I Diversity School ol Pharmacy since 
the tail ol 1956. 

MR. lisss I K\| I R 01 'i I \K' 

Mr Hans Bass, a member ot last \ ear's 
graduating class, has been selected as 
the national undergraduate (rater ol the 

year by Alpha /eta Omega fraternity. 
Mr. Mass finished second in the class 
with an average ot 3.85. He is a mem- 
ber ol Rho Chi and Phi Kappa Phi. He 
held several offices within his class and 
his fraternity during his (our sears in 
the School ot Pharmac> . 

I1IKII COMPLETE DOCTOR \l 

Kl <X IKHMENTS 

Ihree students completed their require- 
ments tor the Doctor of Philosophs de- 
gree in pharmaceutical chemistry this 
past summer. I hey are Myron Wein- 
berg, who is now on the research stall 
at Ortho Pharmaceutical Company in 
New Jersey; Bernard Grabowski who is 
now Assistant Professor of Pharmaceu- 
tical Chemistry at Fordham University, 
School of Pharmacy: and Sam Elkins. 
who is now Assistant Professor of Phar- 
maceutical Chemistry at Temple Uni- 
versity School of Pharmacy . 

DR. SHAY RECEIVES APPOINTMENT 

Dr. Donald E. Shay. Professor of Mi- 
crobiology, was recently appointed 
Chairman of the Membership Commit- 
tee of the National Society of Ameri- 
can Bacteriologists. This is one of the 
three standing committees of the S.A.B. 



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TOKYO OFFICE MOVES 

The office of the Director of the Far 
East Division of the University of 
Maryland Overseas Program was relo- 
cated in September. The new address 
is Building ~22. Washington Heights. 
APO 94. Washington Heights is in 
I okyo. 

1 he University's Tokyo offices had 
been in Pershing Heights, former United 
Nations Command Headquarters, since 
Maryland came to the Far East in 
August. 1956. Pershing Heights has 
no\s been returned to the Japanese 
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52 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Dr. Mason CI. Daly. Director of the 
Far East Division, stated that, through 
the excellent cooperation of military 

officials, the new location in Washing- 
ton Heights, primarily a large U.S. 
military housing area, insures the con- 
tinued accessibility of the Tokyo office 
to security forces personnel. 



OFF-CAMPUS GRADUA It 
WRITES HISTORY OF AIR ACES 

A definiti\e history of America's flying 
aces from World War I through the 
Korean War has been written by Cap- 
tain Gene Gurney, a graduate of the 
I oiversitj of Maryland Program at the 
Pentagon, in Washington. D. C. The 
book was published recently by the 
Putnam Co. 

Captain Gurney's work, entitled Five 
Down and Glory, presents for the first 
time a complete account of America's 
ace fighter pilots, war by war, theater 
by theater and service by service. It 
gi\es not only the complete annals of 
America's air aces, but a detailed samp- 
ling of the battles in which they estab- 
lished themselves as aces. 

The basic premise of the book is that 
America's supremacy in the air may be 
largely attributed to one basic fact: 
the one percent of all American flyers 
who have become aces (at least five 
planes shot down) have accounted for 
from 30 to 40 percent of all the enemy 
aircraft destroyed. 

An interesting footnote to this record 
is that 93 percent of these aces are liv- 
ing today — their mortality rate being 
far below that of the average military 
pilot, according to Captain Gurney. 

Editor of the book is Lieutenant 
Mark P. Friendlander. Jr.. USAF Re- 
serve, a practicing attorney in Wash- 
ington. D. C, who met Captain Gurney 
during a tour of duty in the States. 

Perhaps the most shining of Amer- 
ica's air aces — Captain Eddie Ricken- 
backer — writes the foreword to Cap- 
tain Gurney's book. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR 
CARRIES LONEY ARTICLE 

The August 12, 1958, issue of the Chris- 
tian Science Monitor, one of the most 
respected of U.S. newspapers, carried 
an article on U.S. movies in Europe, 
authored by Dr. Glenn Loney, full-time 
Maryland Lecturer in the European 
Program. 

Loney criticized the low quality of 
American film fare but praised German 
and French dubbing experts. 

(Continued on next page) 




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KLAUS BURKHARD1 M W SUPERVISOR 
OF 1 ANGUAGE COURS1 S 

Mr. Kl;ius Burkhardt. a graduate of the 
Institute ol I anguages and Linguistics. 

School ot Foreign Service, deorgetown 
University, and a former instructor 
there, has succeeded Mr. I haddeus 
Lockard, Jr.. as Supervisor of Language 
Courses tor the European Division of 
the Overseas Program. Mr. Lockard 
has returned to the U.S. and has ac- 
cepted a position as Assistant Professor 
ot Modern Languages at the University 
of the South. 

Mr. Burkhardt was born in Berlin, 
where he completed grammar and high 
school. During the war, he worked in 
an ammunition factory. As members of 
the Evangelical-Lutheran Church (the 
church of Pastor Niemeuller), he and 
his family were persecuted by the Na/is. 

From April. 1945 to August, 1946 
Mr. Burkhardt served as an interpreter, 
investigator and instructor for the U.S. 
Forces in Europe. In the fall of 1946 
he emigrated to the U.S. and held var- 
ious positions with large hotels in New 
York and Washington, D. C. 

Obtaining American citizenship, he 
studied at the Institute of Languages 
and Linguistics. School of Foreign Serv- 
ice, Georgetown University, where he 
also taught German to special Air Force 
students for three years. 

DR. I ARSON SERVES ON FULBRIGHT 
COMMITTEE 

Dr. Robert C. Larson. Assistant Direc- 
tor of the European Division of the 
Overseas Program, was named last 
spring to the Fulbright Scholarship 
Committee for Baden-Wuerttemberg. 
Subsequently, he met with the Commit- 
tee to select 3 1 candidates for Fulbright 
grants to the U.S. from a group of 62. 
The Fulbright Committee, composed 
of Germans and Americans, meets twice 
a year at the American Consulate Gen- 
eral in Stuttgart to select candidates for 
travel grants to the United States from 
German students of widely diversified 
backgrounds and aspirations. 

OFF-CAMPUS AND OVERSEAS DIVISIONS 
LAUNCH NEW ACADEMIC YEAR 

Off-campus stateside enrollments at 
military installations hit new highs as 
the 1958-59 academic year got under 
way. Registration at the Pentagon, the 
UniversitCs largest off-campus military 
center, topped 1000 students in three 
days. Record numbers enrolled at An- 
drews AFB and Fort Meade, both of 
which are located in the \lar\ land- 
Washington. D. C. area. 

In spite oi the uneas\ state of inter- 




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Industrial 

Commercial 

304 STONESTREET AVE. 

OL-2-9156 

Poplar 2-2185 

ROCKVILLE. MD. 







BORNMANN - PATTYSON 
OPTICIANS, Inc. 

1829 K Street, N. W. 
Washington, D. C. ME 8-6379 



For Advertising Space 

in MARYLAND Magazine 

CALL HOpkins 7-9018 

Baltimore, Md. 

or write 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 

18 W. 25th St., Baltimore. Md. 



54 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



national affairs, enrollments in iIk- Ovei 
seas Divisions approximated those ol 
recent years l ho Faj East Division re- 
ported classes as usual on Formosa, the 
center of the current Chinese crisis. 

Barring outbreak ol war, or other un- 
foreseen emergencies requiring exten- 
sive troop shifts. CSCS officials expeel 

a continuation of an extensive program 
of educational services for the Armed 
Forces. 

GEN. NORSTAD PRESENTS AWARD 

The North Atlantic Treat) Organiza- 
tion's Supreme Allied Commander 
Europe. General Lauris Norstad, USAF. 
took time out recently to present an 
education award to a US Air Force 
Officer — a singular gesture for a note- 
worthy achievement. 

The award, the University of Mary- 
land's Outstanding Scholarship Certi- 
ficate, was presented to Captain Eric J. 
Scanlan. of 834 Cavalier Drive. Alex- 
andria. Virginia, who presently serves 
as Provost Marshal. 7415th Support 
Group. Orly, France. 

This is the third time Captain Scanlan 
has received this University of Mary- 
land award; it was, of course, the first 
time the presentation was made by 
General Norstad. 

Such a Certificate is awarded by the 
University to outstanding students with 
exceptionally high averages, in the 17 
courses he has completed to date with 
the University's Overseas Division, this 
38-year old Officer earned 15 A's and 
2 B's. His name has been on the 
Dean's Honor Roll continuously. 

Further recognition of his scholastic 
•work, all completed during off-duty 
time, was taken by his Commanding 
Officer. Orly Base Commander Col. 
Edward C. Tates, who awarded Capt. 
Scanlan a Certificate of Conspicuous 
Educational Achievement, USAF's sec- 
bnd highest award in this field. 

To gain his university credits Capt. 
Scanlan attended classes four nights a 
week, often driving up to 40 miles a 
jnight to reach the center where a 
specific course was being offered. Most 
of his credits were awarded while he 
was overseas, on duty with the US Air 
Force in Africa and France. 

Soon Capt. Scanlan will return to the 
United States to complete his studies on 
Ithe University of Maryland campus 
through "Operation Bootstrap," a 
USAF program to assist worthy and 
qualified personnel further their educa- 
ion on duty time. Following comple- 
tion of his studies for a Bachelor of 
Arts degree in International Relations 
ind Political Sciences, he will go on to 
(Continued on page 59) 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 






J. H. De VEAU & SON, Inc 



General Contractors 



ROADS 

DRIVEWAYS 

PIPE 



EXCAVATION 

BUILDINGS 

CONCRETE 



CONCRETE SAWS 



4100 Jones Bridge Road 

North Chevy Chase, Md 



HIGH DIVIDENDS 



CONSISTENT 
WITH SAFETY 




Columbia the Protectress 



open your regular savings account at 



Columbia Federal Savings 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

730 Eleventh St., N.W. — REpublic 7-7111 

1726 Penn. Ave., N.W. — REpublic 7-7111 

Wisconsin at Jenifer St., N.W. — EMerson 3-1100 



Assets over $50,000,000 



Insured Savings 




POTATO 
CHIPS 



WISE OWL DISTRIBUTORS, INC. 
10753 Colesville Road, Silver Spring, Md. HEmlock 4-9500 



McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

Land Planning and Subdivision 

6480 SLIGO MILL ROAD 

TAKOMA PARK, MD. 
Telephone: JUniper 9-7508 




S. A. GATTI & SONS, 
Inc. 

Institutional Grocers 
3125 V STREET, N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

LA 6-8234 



De! Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 
Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

Two Miles North — University Maryland 

AAA — Open Year Round 

Hot Water Heat 

Best Foods from our Restaurant 

WEbster 5-4852 



CHESTNUT FARMS 
DAIRY 

ADams 2-1011 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



55 



AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD 

VA Mexico 




H athington' i bioit Dtttinguuhed 
Restaurant 

Year Round Air-Conditioning 

COMPLETE DINNERS 

Also Featuring 

• Arroz Con Polio 

• Polio En Mole • Enchiladas 

• Tamolcs • Tacos • Puerco Ado Vado 

Complete Bar • Open 7 Days 

—TWO LOCATIONS— 

2603 Conn. Ave. N.W. 

One Block from Shoreham & Sheraton 

Park Hotels 

HO 2-4550 

and 

20th & Pennsylvania, N.W. 

Three blocks from the White House 

EX 3-9049 

Washington, D. C. .^^^_____ 



CRUSTY 
PIE CO. 



Bakers of 




Finest Quality, 

PIES PASTRIES DONUTS 
CAKES DECORATED CAKES 

30 - St., N. E. 

Washington, D.C. 

ADams 2-7111 




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1217 - 22nd STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



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Vdlaqe, SAop 
PRINCE- -GEORGfJ PINE5T MEN'5 WEAR JT0RE- 



Botany "500" and Hyde Park Clothes 

Dobbs Hats - Bostonian Shoes 

6033 Baltimore Blvd. (between Riverdale and Hyattsville) 

UNion 4-1312 



<?a* 



MGAAflGU 



By Sai i ■> LADIN Ogden 

Da\s arc shorter and it is dark before 
the alternoon is hall o\er. People are 
huming about with gaily wrapped 
packages indicating that Christmas uill 
be here before >ou know it — and with 
it, the ga\est time oi the year. 

Christmas responsibilities means tak- 
ing short cuts in accomplishing all of 
the things that each of us has planned 
for ourselves. Sometimes the assistance 
of professional ser\ices helps tremen- 
dously in carrying part of the load and 
with this thought in mind, we suggest 
the services of a few such firms 

For fine baked pastries and c 
THE CRUSTY PIE COMPANY at 30 
O Street. Northeast. Washington, D. C. 
has the reputation of producing some 
of the finest baked goods in the greater 
Washington area. Mr. Milton Ri\crs 
is the owner and he with the late 
Eugene John Rocca. established the 
Crusty Pie Company in 1928. As the 
name implies, thev baked only fine 
pastries for industrial plants, restaurants 
and hotels in their early da\s. 

With a staff of three the firm grew 
in such proportions that in 1940 it was 
necessary to build the present plant 
which now engages better than 250 
people. The firm no longer bakes pies 
exclusively — today one can order many 
fancy cakes and pastries for small or 
large groups even though industrial and 
commercial distribution still remains a 



i^SSSSSSS9»SSSSSSSSSSSSSS^ 



56 



uhe Shade Shop 

and AFFILIATED PRODUCTS 

2214 M Street, N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

FEderol 7-1200 



Manufacturers and Distributors t 

if Window Shades A 

•k Venetian Blinds 

•jf Folding Doors 

■^ Draperies and Rods 

•j( Screens > 

if Inside Shutters 

if Porch Shades 

if Vertical Blinds 

if Decorative Wood Coverings 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZIN 



w«e^ 



vital pari ol the company's output. 

Baltimoreans will remember Eugene 
ohn Rocca as the head pastry ehet 
ot Miller Brothers famous Restaur- 
ant at 1 19 \V. Fayette Street. Baltimore. 
tfe worked with Miller Brothers for 
-nam sears and later went on to the 
Fisher Pie Company of Baltimore he- 
ore becoming the partner of Mr. 
Rivers. 

Mr. Rocca's death in 1956 was a 
jreat loss to an ever growing industry. 
Today Mr. Rivers as the sole owner 
kin expanded the companies opera- 
tions to Portsmouth. Virginia. 

When the Christmas rush finds you 
the predicament of not being able 
o entertain at home, there are some 
delightful places to take your guests — 
xrth in Baltimore and Washington 
ivhere you can enjoy a leisurely meal 
n quiet, peaceful surroundings. You'll 
lot be rushed and your host in each 
:ase will do his utmost to make you 
and your guests feel at home. 

One such place is THE TAYLOR 
HOUSE. Taylor Avenue at Loch Raven 
Boulevard. Baltimore, operated by 
Elmer C. Rigby. Mr. Rigby, a graduate 
it the University of Maryland Class of 
'43. is a genial host. 

The food at Taylor House is unsur- 
passed and the atmosphere is colorful 
and interesting. 



Mr. Rigby, a well known sportsman 
ol Baltimore, played hall back on the 
Maryland Football team and was also 
on the (rack I earn during his varsitj 
years. In more recent years liis name 
has been linked with doll among the 
pros of the country . 

The war was on when young Rigb) 
graduated from Maryland. He served 
in the 26th Division of the Army, at- 
tained the rank of Captain and saw 
active t.liit\ in the European Theatre 
ol War. 

Mr. Rigby has a pleasing personality 
and when he chose the business ol 
operating a fine eating house, he chose 
wisely as he is a gracious man who 
makes every effort to please his guests. 



In Washington there are. among 
other fine dining places, two Chinese 
Restaurants of note, where the weary 
shopper can dine in splendor. 

The YENCHING PALACE, oper- 
ated by Mr. Paul Dietrich, claims that 
"Yenching Palace entertains more Dip- 
lomats daily than the White House." 
This fine restaurant has facilities for 
private parties and can accommodate 
both small and large groups. The menu 
includes 151 main course Chinese 
dishes. 

Mr. Dietrich got his experience with 
the Hilton Hotel in New York, and 
when he opened Yenching Palace in 
1953, he was a seasoned operator in 
restaurant "know-how." 

Yenching Palace, located at 3524 
Connecticut Avenue, Northwest, Wash- 
ington, D. C, serves luncheons, din- 
ners and suppers — it has a full bar — 
and is a member of the Diners' Club. 

Four students of the University of 
Maryland work for Yenching Palace 




and dies, with the lesl ol the stall, see 

thai you are elegantl) seised 



Anothei hue dining place, MOON 

PAI A( I al J308 Wisconsin Avenue. 



, A j. -14. J. A -1.14. 4- 4- AX 4- 4. 4- 4. .14. 4. J. J- 4.4. .14 

-1 

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The Superb Gift! 

A MANO SWARTZ 
MINK STOLE 

from v|> I W 



225 N. Howard St., Baltimore 



tTTftTtTtTTTtTTTTTTTTTTTTV 




MOON 
PALACE 



Washington's Most Dignified and 

Unique Chinese & American 

Restaurant 

That Is Truly Different 

* Intimate Cocktail Lounge 

* Authentic Chinese Foods 

* Superb American Cuisine 

* Private Party Facilities 

* Fast Home Delivery Service 

* Ample Free Parking in Rear 

* Open Daily and Sunday 

3308 WISCONSIN AVE. N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C 

EM 2-6645-46 

Member of Diner's Club 



PEABODY CONSERVATORY -COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

Peter Mennin, Director 
announces the remaining 

L^anaieiiakt L^oncerts 

for 1958-1959 

A sparkling series of Tuesday evening events featuring world-renowned 
soloists and ensembles. 




November 1 1 — 

Moura Lympany, pianist 
December 1 6 — 

Phyllis Curtin, soprano 

March 10 — 

I Musici, virtuoso ensemble 



January 20 — 

Quartetto Italiano 
February 24 — 

Frankel-Ryder Dance Drama 



SINGtE TICKETS— $3.00, $2.75, $2.50 

Peabody Ticket Office — 19 E. Mt. Vernon Place 

SA 7-U57 Baltimore, Md. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1958 



57 



Qq* 



Mainland iV&ni&H, 



Northwest, the oewesl ol the Washing- 
ion ( hinese restaurants, has initiated 
a number oi fine dishes which will hi 
perfectly into your bolida) festivities. 

Moon Palace's best kept secret is the 
dish I mpress Shrimp'" served as a 
Chinese Hors d'oeuvre. legend sa\s 
this dish was created especially for the 
Dowager Empress and that the recipe 
lias been carefully guarded for genera- 
tions. Among other hors d'oeuvres that 
are exceptional for your party at home 
(as Moon Palace has carry-out service) 
are barbequcd spareribs, prepared with 
unusual herbs and spices; Sem Sem. 
tiny Chinese pastry and sauted chicken 



The Best 
'Northern Chinese 

Food in the 
.Nation's Capital 



"We Entertain 

More Diplomats Daily 

Thon the White 

House" 

International 
Cocktails 

Yenching Palace 

3524 Conn. Ave. N.W. 

Ut Porter St.) 

EM 2-6358 Wash., D. C. 



livers, basted with oyster sauce. I his 
ancient treat is reputedly an Imperial 
recipe that originated at the Summer 
Palace. 

Dine at Moon Palace or call in and 
your order will be ready and waiting 
lor you when you drive into their park- 
ing lot. A wonderful way to get a 
dinner ready in a hurry — during these 

busy days. 

* * * 

lake time out to relax and enjo\ a 
good book and among the good Christ- 
mas books at COKESBURY BOOK 
STORE. 516 North Charles Street in 
Baltimore, are the following: 

Aku-Akit by Thor Heyerdahl. 

American Heritage Book of the 
Revolution. 

The Great West by Charles Neider. 

Trouble With Lazy Ethel by Ernest 
K. Gann. 

Crusoes of Sunday Island by Elsie K. 
Morton. 

Dr. Zhivago a novel by Boris 
Pasternak. 

The linage Makers by Bernard V. 
Dryer. 

Aiii>elique by Sergeanne Golon. 
The Cavalryman by Harold Sinclair. 

Last Train from Atlanta by A. A. 
Hoeliling. 



We regret thai in the September- 
October issue of Maryland Magazine the 
name of Miss Elizabeth Cooney's Per- 
sonnel Agency of I5ll Pemridge Road. 
Baltimore, Maryland. was misspelled. 
Sorry! 




INTERIORS- 



by STEIN 



Complete con- 
sultation serv- 
ice for your 
Home or Of- 
fice (without 
eharire or ob- 
ligation) 



Funiture from the better sources, 
Firth Carpets, Crest Lamps, and 
finer fabrics for curtains, dra- 
peries & upholstery. 
for estimates and information 
Call LE. 9-SS84. 

WM. P. STEIN, INC. 

401 N. CHARLES at Mulberry 
Baltimore, Md 




^rrottander S 
t\es tan rant 




the same x: 

DELICIOUS FOOD AND 

COCKTAILS 

DELIGHTFUL 

ATMOSPHERE 



"Washington's Best Restaurant" 

Holiday Magazine (4th Consecutive Year) 

"One of America's Ten Best" 

National Poll 

OCCIDENTAL 

Where Statesmen Dine 

1411 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. 

Between the Washington & Willard Hotels 






***smmmas®?. 



Open Daily & Sunday 11:30 A.M. -1:00 A.M. 
Telephone 01. 7-6467 

Five Beautifully Appointed Rooms Catering To Parties, Meetings And Banquets Accommodating 10 To 250 Persons. 

Established For Over 100 Years 



58 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Special and Continuation Studios 
Continued from page 55 



obtain a Master of Arts degree in the 
same field. 

Capt. ScanJan u.is bora in Auckland, 
New Zealand, and spent his youth in 

the South Sea Islands on American 
Samoa. He is married to the former 
Miss Maria E. Curry, of St. John. New 
Brunswick. Canada. The Scanlans have 
one son. David, aged 10. 

SCHOLARSHIP WINNER 

Joe Haid of the 106 Medical Detach- 
ment recently a University of Maryland 
scholarship at Camp Red Cloud. Korea. 
I he scholarship includes tuition, regis- 
tration fee, and book cost for History 5, 
taught by Dr. Philip Wheaton. It was 
awarded on the basis of scores made on 
the college level CiED tests. 



SOCIAL NOTES 



MARRIAGES 

Miss Joan B. Sweezey, Nursing '56. to 
Dr. Edward Bird, on June 7, 1958. 

Miss Salley J. Strott, Nursing '56, to 
Mr. D. D. Dempster, on July 13, 1957. 

Miss Margaret Ann Young, Nursing 
'56, to Mr. Ted Whitacre, on June 14, 
1958. 

Miss Martha Mallon, Nursing '13, to 
Mr. Walter Ernest Lassahn, on June 17, 
1958. 

Miss Judy Mae Williams, Nursing 
'56, to Dr. Hans Richard Wilhelsen, on 
June 21, 1958. 

Miss Helen Mae Wheatley, Nursing 
'52. to Mr. Walter Charles Kaufman, 
'III, on June 14, 1958. 

Miss Elizabeth Mae Harris, Nursing 
'55, to Mr. James E. Downs, on Febru- 
ary 1, 1958. 

Miss Sue Emma Harman, Nursing 
'57. to Mr. Karl Mathias Green, on 
June 28, 1958. 

Miss Joanne M. Gesell, Nursing '56, 
to Mr. Howard R. Sheely, III, on April 
19. 1958. 

Miss Georgia Anne Hinely, Nursing 
'55. to William Edwin Smith, on July 
12. 1958. 

Miss Patricia E. Smith, Nursing '55, 
to Dr. Haskell H. Bass, Jr. on August 
16. 1958. 

(Continued on next page) 



—T^ 



OWEN ELECTRIC CO. 

'■■■■■■■■■■^■■■■■■■■MBMBaH 



"-ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS & ENGINEERS 



Telephone: WAr field 5-8500 



ENTERPRISE ROAD 



MITCHELLVILLE, MARYLAND 



mmmmm*» m*^- stone house 






w I 




WASHINGTON 




U. OF 
MARYLAND- 



SILVER 
SPRING 



BETHESDA 



. . . visit the Maryland Room 
where smart people gather 
for dining at its best 

FOUR CORNERS HIWAY 29 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

JUniper 8-9700 



DEEP SOUTH BAR-B-Q 

7553 New Hampshire Ave. 

LANGLEY PARK, Washington, D. C. 

HEmlock 4-1818 




BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

"Became 2uaiUif- GojiAcIomA- " 



PLANT 



REpublic 7-5400 



621-27 G STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 

BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfield 7-0880 



SmiTH UJElDinC 

COMPANY 



PORTABLE EQUIPMENT 



Phone UNion 4-1611 

4803 Rhode Island Ave. 
Hyattsville. Md. 



James Speros 

Jyormanay, !Jarm 

POTOMAC, MARYLAND OL 2-9421 




Open daily 12 to 12 midnight 

— Air conditioned — 

Member Diner's Club and Universal 

Travel Card 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



59 



Bright and cheery 




as a Christmas candle, 




is our wish for 




A Happy Yuletide. 




EMERSON 


HOTEL 


WILLIAM E. STUBBS. JR. 


Vice-Pres. and Gen 


. Mgr. 




Now! Buy a Complete 
High-Fidelity System for 
just $129.95 Only at 

Custom Music Systems 



For hi-fi information 
phone 



106 W. NORTH AVENUE 

VErnon 7-3900 




PENINSULA POULTRY DISTRIBUTORS, Inc. 



Eviscerated Poultry 
Western Turkeys 



Cornish Game Hens 
Beltsville Turkeys 



Call— ANDREW BLASCO— Plaza 2-0287 
221 S. Howard Street Baltimore 1. Md. 



KATHERINE ROBB Nursing Home 

REST HOME For Aged and Convalescents 
Essex Road near Liberty Road 

HUnter 6-5656 BALTIMORE, MD. 



TASTE THE DIFFERENCE 
QUALITY MAKES! 



ZSSKAV 

lftQUALITYV 



ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to whole- 
some, flavorful perfection. Be 
sure to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 

Wm. SCHLUDERBERG — T. J. KURDLE CO. 



Hendlers 




First Name in Ice Cream 
For Over A Half Century 



Miss ( harlotte E. Culp, Nursing '57, 
to Lt. William B. Diedrich, on Septem- 
ber 6, 1958. 

Miss Nancy Ruth Skadding, Nursing 
'56, to Mr. John Leo Horgan. on Au- 
gust 2. 1958. 

Miss Lillie M. Baxter, Nursing '56, 
to Dr. David Poole Largey. on August 
23. 1958. 

Mr and Mrs. Palmer Kenneth Lar- 
son announce the marriage of their 
daughter Delores Faye to Mr. Robert 
Alan Margulies. B.P.A. '54. on Satur- 
day. August 30, 1958. in Long Beach. 
California. 

BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Mincemo\er. a 
daughter. Beth Ann. on April 27. 1958. 
Mrs. Mincemo\er was Elizabeth Jane 
KaufTman. Nursing "48. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Huster. a son. 
Michael Shawn, on December 9. 1957. 
Mrs. Huster was Patricia Huster. Nurs- 
ing '56. 

S Sgt. L'SAF and Mrs. Frederick A. 
Thayer, a daughter. Mary Elizabeth. 
Born in February. 1958. Mrs. Thayer 
was Peggy June Feiser. Nursing '51. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Bronushas. 
a son, Joseph Benedict. Junior, on May 
26. 1958. Mrs. Bronushas was Carolyn 
O'Neil Lewis. Nursing '53. 

Mr. and Mrs. Randall C. Cronin. a 
son. William Cornelius, on June 30, 
1958. Mrs. Cronin was Adeline Rosalie 
Mosberg. Nursing '46. 

Dr. and Mrs. T. Jack Gibson, a 
daughter. Tyla Jayne. on July 22. 1958. 
Mrs. Gibson was Joretta Snouberger. 
Nursing '52. 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry A. Baer. a 
daughter. Brenda Margaret, on July 18, 
1958. Mrs. Baer was Carolyn E. 
Myers. Nursing '53. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Louis Avery, 
a son. Eric Alan, on April 6. 1958. 
Mrs. Avery was Joyce Johnson. Nurs- 
ing '52. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Wallace Hoat- 
son. a son. David Laurence, on April 
8, 1958. Mrs. Hoatson was Bett> Ann 
Dorfler. Nursing '54. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Francis Ker- 
ger. Sr.. a daughter. Robin Elizabeth, 
on April 9. [958. Mrs. Kerger wm 
Brunehilda Gondina Oliveira. Nursing 
'48. 

Dr. and Mrs. George Alvin Lentz. 
Jr.. a son. George Alvin. III. on Maj 6, 
1958. Mrs. Lentz was Shirley Jane 
Bramble. Nursing '56. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Daniel B. 
Childs. both 1956 graduates, a daughter. 
Susan Eleanor Childs. on March 6. 
1958. 



60 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Mr. and Mrs. John B. Yingling, Jr., 
announce the birth of their son, John 
I dward III. on Ma) 10, 1958. Mrs 
Yingling is the former Nancj Ann 
Shrop, Nursing '56. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 





Prof. A ha It 
ARTHUR AHALT 

Arthur M. Ahalt. prominent agricultural 
educator, died September 12 at the 
Prince Georges County General Hos- 
pital. Professor Ahalt had been a mem- 
ber of the University faculty since 
1939. Well known in vocational agri- 
culture circles, he authored numerous 
experiment station bulletins and articles 
in the vocational agriculture area. His 
greatest contributions lay in the train- 
ing of scores of prominent agricultural 
leaders. In 1947 he became Head of 
the Agriculture Education Department 
at the University. 

The funeral was held in Middletown, 
Maryland, September 16. He is sur- 
vived by his wife, his daughter, and two 
brothers. 

CLIFTON E. FULLER 

Clifton E. "Uncle Tippy" Fuller of 

Cumberland, Maryland, and one of the 

most faithful Maryland alumni died 

September 3, 1958, at the age of 85. 

He was a member of the first Maryland 

football team for the old Maryland 

\ Agricultural College in 1892. He was 

graduated in 1896 and was an ardent 

football enthusiast from that time for- 

| ward. His was the sole distinction of 

(Continued on next page) 



THE 


BALTIMORE ASPHALT 


BLOCK and TILE CO. 


BABCO 




HOT ASPHALT PAVEMENTS 


general 


• private driveways 

• industrial yards 
for • service stations 

9 playgrounds 

• parking areas 


contractors 


1320 N. MONROE ST. BALTIMORE 17, MD. 


Call: MAdison 3-4346 






Garamond Press 




15 SOUTH FREDERICK STREET • BALTIMORE 2, MARYLAND 
YEARBOOKS • CATALOGUES • PERIODICALS • LIMITED EDITIONS 






Get in touch with us regarding 
the affair you are planning 



Bus. LExington 9-8400— Ext. 216 
Res. MUlberry 5-6523 



BALTIMORE CHECK ROOM SERVICE 

CHECKING FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

(no junction is too large or too small) 

CHECKING FOR HOMES OR HALLS 

DAN MORACO Office Lord Baltimore Hotel Check Room 




NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



61 



1906 



52nd ANNIVERSARY 




1958 



ARUNDEL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts - liberal dividends 

• 
Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

Christmas Clubs — Safe Deposit Boxes 

Community Hall for Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 daily 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 

PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25, Md. ELgin 5-9300 




PESTS? 



"CaUIA* 



TERMITES? 



Rod* Ma**" 




PEST CONTROLSFNCEI860 



C. Walter Porter, Mgr. 

SAratoga 7-6118 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



having returned for University of Mary- 
land Homecoming games in an un- 
broken string from 1934 through 1957. 
Just prior to his last illness, he made dis- 
tribution of Maryland football placards 
to commercial concerns for the Cum- 
berland area. 

A native of Cumberland, he served 
as Finance Commissioner from 1946 to 
194X. He was a retired railroad express 
clerk and a member of the Brotherhood 
of Railway Clerks. He was a 50-year 
Mason, a member of the Senior Citizens 
Club of Cumberland, the University 
M" Club and was President of the 
Senior Bible Class at Kinsley Methodist 
Church. 

"Uncle Tippy" had become both a 
tradition and an institution at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. He will be missed 
by the Homecoming Queens whom he 
helped to crown, and by the thousands 
of students and alumni who knew him. 

He is survived by four sons, seven 
grandchildren and three great-grand- 
children. 

COLONEL WILLIAM BAILY 

Colonel William Baily, a 1954 graduate 
of the University of Maryland Overseas 
Program — and one of the biggest boost- 
ers of the Program — died recently in 
Washington. D. C. 

At the time of his death he was 
assigned to Headquarters, USAF. at 
the Pentagon. 

A native of Wald, Switzerland, later 
homesteaded at Orcas Island. Washing- 
ton, Colonel Baily served with Head- 
quarters, Eighth Air Force, and Head- 
quarters, Strategic Air Forces, in 
Europe during the war. After Com- 
mand and Staff School, he went to the 
Pentagon and worked in the Maryland 
Program there before Overseas assign- 
ment. 

DR. N. HERBERT BAILEY 

Dr. N. Herbert Bailey. Med. "11. died 
June 30. 1958 in St. Francis Hospital 
In lieu of flowers, friends were asked 
to send a contribution to St. Francis 
Hospital in Dr. Bailey's memory. 

JUDGE ELI FRANK. 

Judge Eli Frank. Law '96, retired jurist 
of the Baltimore Supreme Bench, died 
at his home in Baltimore July 25. 1958. 
after a lengthy illness. He had served in 
judicial positions for 22 years, giving 
up his private practice in 1922. 

At the Law School, he won a prize 
for the best thesis and another for the 
highest average grades. He later lec- 
tured at Maryland and at the old Balti- 
more Law School. 

He was a Past President of the Balti- 
more and Marvland Bar Associations. 



Why 



MlTCHEtfj 



is 



mfiRYLfillD'S FMEST COM 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
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corn in cans with- 
in the hour it is 
pulled from the 
stalk. 



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GOLDEN SWEET 



- Packed by 

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Phone Aberdeen 621 -J 




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& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

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FINE FOOD & DRINKS 
Visit Our Internationally Famous Wine Cellar 

FIFTH AVE. & BRENTWOOD 

DUNDALK, MD. 
From College Park take Baltimore 
Harbor Tunnel to 1st Exit (Holahird 
Ave.) then one mile to Brentwood Inn. 

For Reservations Call 
ATwater 5-0520 • ATwater 4-9854 



62 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



i i>l ONEl JOSI I'll I . \M \N 

Colonel Joseph 1 . A man. Ag. I I. died 

Jul) 28, 1958 at Waller Reed Hospital. 

He served with the United States Amu 
25 years, seeing both World Wars. 
\tter his retirement in 1 *->43. he was 
active for a time in civic affairs in 
Prince Georges County. He served as 
President of the YMCA Council m 
l l )45 and as Executive Secretary of the 
Advisory Hoard to the County Com- 
missioners in 1945-46. 



DR. ALEXANDER MC I EOD 

Alexander McLeod, Med. '13. died 
September 2 in a Richmond hospital. 
Dr. Mel cod had been a general practi- 
tioner in the Glen Allen. Virginia, com- 
munity for more than 40 years. He was 
a member of the Glen Allen Masonic 
Lodge, the American Legion and Green- 
wood Methodist Church. 

Surviving are his wife, three sons, a 
daughter, a brother, and 10 grand- 
children. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 

Dr. Eugene H. Hayward. '01, well 
known Maryland surgeon for many 
years, died on August 6, 1958. 

Dr. Richard M. Nelson. '03. of At- 
lanta. Georgia, died on March 6, 1958. 
•of cardiac failure at the age of 76. 

Dr. Howard Victor Dutrow, '04, 
Dayton. Ohio, died on March 17, 1958. 

Dr. Jacob Carter Fisk, '05, of New 
York City died on April 26. 1958, at 
the age of 84. 

Dr. Harvey A. Kelley, '06, of Win- 
throp, Massachusetts, died on April 8, 
1958, of pulmonary edema, aged 75. 
Dr. Kelley was a veteran of World 
Wars I and II. 

Dr. Earl Lee Reger. '07, of Spokane, 
Washington, died on April 3, 1958, of 
arteriosclerosis at the age of 82. Dr. 
Reger was a veteran of World War I. 

Dr. Allen Eugene Burner, '08, of 
Durbin, West Virginia, died July 23. 
1958. at the age of 82. Dr. Burner main- 
tained an active full time practice up 
to the time of his death. 

Dr. William H. Walcott. '08. of Alex- 
andria, Virginia, died on May 27. 1958, 
following an illness of several years. 

Dr. William Cole Davis. '08. of Lex- 
ington, Virginia, died February 23. 
1958, of cancer and pneumonia, aged 
75. Dr. Cole was a veteran of World 
Wars I and II. 

Dr. D. George Mankovich, of Punx- 
jsutawney, Pennsylvania, died April 22. 
il 958. of diabetes acidosis at the age of 
51. 



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Insurance & Bonding of every 
description for more than 
half a century 



Policy analysis 
Engineering surveys 
Appraisals 



Phone: LExington 9-6004 

BALTIMORE 3, MD. 

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Industrial Mill Supplies, Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 
SAFETY SUPPLIES 

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OFFICE INTERIORS AND 
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THE UNUSUAL IN OFFICE FURNITURE 
and ACCESSORIES 

Let our well-trained staff assist you 
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MODERN 

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17 S. CHARLES ST. MU S-4377 

BALTIMORE 

Serving this area since 1919 



King Bros., Inc. 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2. MD. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1958 



63 



Directory of Advertisers 



Acme lion Works 42 

Advertisers Engraving Company 30 

Advertisers Mml Service 33 

\k l/.ll 50 

American Disinfectant to 35 

can Office Equipment Co., iru 4< 

Aim i lean Plate Glass Co 42 

Anchoi Posl Products (Anchoi Fence) 41 

\ i ) Anderson 52 

Arnolds Village Shop 56 

Vrundel Federal Savings ft Loan Assn 62 

Atchison ft Keller, Inc ... 42 

Alvin 1 Aubinoe Outside Back c ovei 

A\ ignone I reres 32 



Baltimore Asphalt Block A Hie Co '>l 

Baltimore Business Forms 50 

Baltimore Check Room Service 61 

Baltimore Envelope Co 47 

Bank ol C nslield 38 

Bard Avon School 43 

Bartletl Real Estate 37 

C. J. Benson Furniture Co 31 

Bergmann'a I aundr) 59 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mlg. Co.. Inc 44 

Blackie's House- ol Bed 56 

Bon Ton Saratoga Chip Distributors 46 

Bornmann-Pattyson Opticians, Inc 54 

Harrj A. Boswell Co 32 

F. S. Bowen Electrical contractor 59 

Brentwood Inn 62 

Briggs Construction Co.. Inc 41 

Briggs Meat Product Co 34 

Buck Class Co 48 



C . inch's C alifornian 49 

Cape Cod Caterers 54 

Capitol Frito Co.. Inc 35 

Carey Machinery & Supply Co 63 

C arlea Janitor Supply Co 30 

I nomas I Carroll & Son 62 

I) Harry Chambers. Opticians 53 

Chestnut Farms Dairy 55 

< m/ens National Bank 37 

M. M. Clark Cement Co 44 

Cohn ft Bock Co 37 

C okesbury Book Store 52 

< olson Merriam 43 

( olumbia Federal Savings & Loan Assn 55 

Continental Baking Co 34 

Elizabeth Cooney Personnel Agency 53 

C ount) litle Co., Inc 41 

A. Myron Cowell, Inc 47 

C nss Brothers & Co 40 

c rosse .x Blackwell Co 28 

c rout. Snyder ft Crandall 53 

Crown Oil cv. Wax Co 39 

( rusi\ Pie c ompany 56 

Cullen Photo Co 40 

c urlander Lav, Book c !o 48 

Victor ( ushwa ft Sons 46 

Custom Music Systems 60 



Danny's Formal Wear 52 

Davidson transfer ft Storage Co 48 

F. A. Davis ft Sons . 50 

Del-Haven White House Motel 55 

J H. DeVeau ft Sons, inc 55 

Dietrich .x Gambrill, [nc 28 

Dietrich Bros., inc 53 

I tomino Restaurant 32 

Drummond ft company 31 

Duncan Bros. Inc. 37 

Norman S. I arley & Son 39 

Electronic Wholesalers. Inc 51 

I dwin I I llett 45 

I I Mexico Restaurant 56 

I merson Hotel 60 

( I DgelS .X Sons 51 

Ted I nelchardt. Architect 62 



I armen Cooperative Assocn 

J n I llbert, Inc ... 52 

First federal Savings A loan Assocn 

Inside I ront C ovei 
N ilion.il Bank ol Baltimore 

Inside Back < 
I n Motors. I Id. 

Fraternit) Federal Savings a. Loan Assn. '4 

Frederick Underwriters, Inc. '9 

Fuller A. d'Albert. Inc 4(1 

Ciaramond Press 61 

s \ i, ..in A. Son. Inc 55 

Albeit I Goetze Packing Co.. Inc 42 

Graj ( oncrete Pipe c o 47 

I he Hand) line (Paul M. Adams) SO 

Hannes Formal Wear 41 

Harrington Hotel 54 

Harvey Dairy, Inc 47 

Ilcarn-Kirkwood 34 

Hendler's Ice C ream 60 

Hillyard Saks Co 40 

Hut's I lectrical Service, Inc 54 

Robert I Hofl 51 

Ihe llollbcrgcr CO 53 

Hollander's Restaurant 58 

Hotel Dupont Pla/a Outside Back Cover 

Hulfcr-Shinn Optical CO 30 

W. I', lhire & Sons 33 

In Town Motor Hotels 41 

Johannes & Murray 49 

Johnston. Lemon & Co 45 

Frank B. Jones 47 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 46 

King Bros. Printing 63 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 50 

Koontz Creamery, Inc 43 

Lamar & Wallace 34 

Lawyers Title Co. of Prince Georges County, 

Inc 29 

Maurice Leeser Co 40 

Lord Calvert Hotel 44 

I ustine-NichoIson 44 

Mangels. Ilerold CO.. Inc 45 

Manas Restaurant 29 

Marks Home Furnishings 46 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 48 

Mason Canning Company 37 

Masser's Motel & Restaurant 39 

Massey-Ferguson. Inc 31 

Chiton D. May hew 44 

Meadow Cold Ice Cream Co 63 

Midstate Federal Savings & Loan Assn 43 

Miller Metal Products. Inc 30 

F. O. Mitchell ft Bro.. Inc 62 

Modern Machinist Co 54 

Modern Stationery Co 63 

M. P. MoUer, Inc 39 

Moon Palace Restaurant 57 

John J. <x F. Rowland McGinity 5(1 

Mcleod ft Romborg Stone Co 41 

McNeill Surveys. Inc 55 

National Bank ol Cambridge 

N.monal Equipment ft Supply Co 51 

Norman Motor Co 45 

Normandy I aims 59 

North Washington Press, Inc 45 

Occidental Restaurant 5S 

( >lnc> Inn 44 

Ottenberg'S Bakers. Inc 54 



Palmer Ford. Inc 

Park Transfer CO 

I'eabody Conservatory ol Music 
Peninsula Poultry Distributors. Inc 
i Bernie Lee's i Penn Hotel 
R B. Phelps Stone CO. 

Bowen, Bartletl .X Kennedy. Inc. 
Jimmie Porter < I A Krcrnan's) 



Ouick Service laundry 



40 
32 

57 

63 



Refrigeration Supply C o 

Regionecr Corp 

Restorff Motors 

Rex Engraving Co 

RidgevOle Nurseries 

Riverviev? Courts 

Katherinc Robb Nursing Home 

Roma Restaurant 

Rose Exterminator Co 



Salisbury Milling CO 

Salisbury Rug Co 

x an Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co. (Exskayj 

Seidenspinner. Realtor 

I he Shade Shop 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. ... 

Singer Sewing Machine Co 

Russell W Smith, Insurance 

Smith W elding Co 

Southcomb. Inc 

Southeastern Floor Co 

Southern Oxygen Co 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 

Star Baking Co 

Wm. P. Stein. Inc 

Sterling Lighting Co 

Sterling Process. Bookbinders 

Steuart Petroleum Co 

Stone House Inn 

Student's Supply Store 

Suburban Supply Co.. Inc 

Suburban Trust Co 

Mano Swartz 

Sweetheart Bakers 



47 

42 

61 
39 
I 
60 
31 
62 



36 
36 
43 
6(1 
29 
56 
35 
32 
47 
59 
31 
35 
51 

37 
SI 

4» 
47 
49 
59 
40 
42 
32 

36 



Fay lor House 

Thomas & Thompson Co 

Thomsson Steel Co 

Wm. J. Tickner A. Sons. Inc 

Town Reinforcing Concrete Construction Co.. 
Inc 



43 
33 

51 



Universal Electro Plating Co 49 



James T. Vernaj ft Sons Co 



W allop ft Son. Insurance 

Washington Coca Cola Bottling Works 

Washington Ply -Rite CO 

J. I. Wells Co., Inc 

W estinghouse Electric Corp 

W hue Rice Inn 

Wholesale Radio Parts Co. Inc 

Perry O. Wilkinson 

Carl J. Williams ft Sons 

i McKenro Willis 

W ise Owl Distributors 

I Randolph Wootton ft Co 

w orcester Fertilizer Co 

W ye Plantation 



s. enching Palace 



29 
29 

51 

33 
SO 
50 
35 

36 
36 
55 
52 
37 






64 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 








Tomorrow's sky belongs to the man on the right! 



He's your "small fry" today. He's America's best 
hope for tomorrow. To give him his chance— and to 
provide for the future of the rest of your family 
as well— is your fondest wish and your foremost 
responsibility. First National stands ready to as- 
sist you in two ways. We will be pleased to dis- 



cuss with you and your attorney the advantages 
of creating a Trust Fund either during your life- 
time or by your will. Or perhaps you will want to 
start with a First National Savings Account. Either 
way, you will be brightening the sky of your 
family's future. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Baltimore 



Main Office: light & Redwood • Offices throughout Balto. area 
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1515 19th Street, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Phone: 
HUdson 3-6025 



Volume XXX • Number 2 
January-February • 1959 



the 



Maryland 



magazine 



J AN 2 9 1959 



' — < 




Alumni Publication of the 



University of Maryland 







M 



1- ■ » ' 



In This Issue: Statement to the Alumni Council 
Alumni Enthusiasm at Homecoming 
New Pharmacy Building Dedicated 
Fund Victory Dinner Points Way to 1959 




WE WANT MEN TO CREATE TOMORROW'S HEADLINES! 



The new, dynamic and diversified Northrop Aircraft, Inc., 
creates an ideal work climate for forward-thinking scientists 
and engineers. Our three autonomous divisions are all in 
Southern California -are all headed by progressive manage- 
ment eager to examine and try new ideas. 

Let's assume that you are a man who can qualify for one of 
our engineering teams -a man who can create history! 

You'll earn what you're %vorth, get increases as often as you 
earn them - based on your own individual achievements. Our 
salary structure is unique in the industry; our vacation 
policy extra-liberal, as are all of our other fringe benefits. 

You'll learn while you earn, with no-cost and low-cost educa- 
tion opportunities at leading Southern California institu- 
tions-earn advanced degrees and keep abreast of the latest 
technological advances in your own chosen field. 

You'll WOrk with men who are acknowledged leaders in their 
fields -men chosen for their own capabilities and for skills 
in guiding and developing the creative talents of younger 
men. And. these are men who delegate authority, assuring 
your fair share of credit for engineering triumphs. 

You'll be flexible - able to apply your talents to the work you 
enjoy, in the field best suited to your own inclination and 
ability. Northrop Aircraft and its divisions offer wide diver- 
sity, with over 30 operational fields to choose from. All offer 
challenge aplenty -opportunity unlimited! 

NOW Choose! See what each division of Northrop Aircraft 
has done and is doing. Then choose the division that offers 
you the most challenge. Write today to reserve your spot 
where news is happening — for your oun chance to create 
tomorrow's headlines ! 



...NEWS IS HAPPENING AT NORTHROP 



NORTRONICS DIVISION 

Pioneers in celestial and inertial guidance. At 
Hawthorne: exploring infrared applications, 
, /V7\ airborne digital computers and interplan- 

V V V etary navigation. At Anaheim: developing 

v ground support, optical and electro-mechani- 

cal equipment, and data processing devices. 

Write: Engineering Personnel Mgr., Nortronies Division, 
222 North Prairie Ave.. Hawthorne. California 
or: 500 East Orangethorpe Ave., Anaheim, Calif. 



NORTHROP DIVISION 

-v Creators of the USAF Snark SM-62, now 

^k operational with SAC. Currently active in 

% programs for the ballistic recovery of orbit- 

y ing man: readying the USAF-Northrop T-38 

supersonic twin jet trainer and the Northrop 

N-156F counterair fighter for flight tests. 

Write: Engineering Personnel Mgr., Northrop Division, 
1001 East Broadway, Hawthorne, California 







rite 




RADIOPLANE DIVISION 

Creator of the world's first drone family; has 
produced and delivered tens of thousands 
of drones for all the U.S. Armed Forces. 
Now developing ultra advanced target drone 
systems for weapon evaluation, surveillance 
drone systems, and guided missile systems. 

Engineering Personnel Mgr.. Radioplane Division, 
8000 Woodley Avenue, Van Nuys, California 



NORTHROP AIRCRAFT, INC., Beverly Hills, California 




COVER: Ow covei shows Dr. I Ikms crowning the 1958 Homecoming Queen, 
Scarlett I oris. .S/<>m and photographs on pages 6 mid 7. 

PHOTOGRAPH in \l DANEGGER, III \l>. PHOTOGRAPH!) I tBORATOR^ 



Maryland 



Volume XXX 



magazine 
Number 2 



JANUARY— FEBRUARY • 1959 



Alumni Publication of 

the University of Maryland 

BOARD OF REGENTS 



CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 
EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice Chairman 
B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
ILOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
EDMUND S. BURKE, Assistant Treasurer 
ALVIN L. AUBINOE 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
£NOS S. STOCKBRIDGE 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
1 EWING TUTTLE 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 



ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 

OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFIC ERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

FRANK BLOCK, '24, President 

BARRY A. BOSWELL, JR., '42, Vice-President 

MRS. GERALDINE P. EDWARDS, 31, Vice-President 

DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 

VICTOR HOLM. '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 
Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018) (FE 7-2113) 



In This Issue — 



FEATURES 



2 
3 
5 
6 
8 

10 
14 

15 

20 
21 



NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



25 
27 
30 
32 
35 
43 
46 
47 
49 
57 
59 

61 

62 

64 



The Alumni Diary 
Alumni and Campus Notes 
Statement by Dr. Elkins to the Alumni Council 
Alumni Enthusiasm Demonstrated at Homecoming 
Our Freedom of the Press Heritage 
Pharmacy's 'Dunning Hall' Dedicated in December 
Fund Victory Dinner Points Way to 1959 Campaign; White Engineer- 
ing Fellowship and Loan Plan Established 
The Children's Remedial Fitness Clinic 
News from the Clubs 
University Sports 



Agriculture 

Arts and Sciences 

Business and Public Administration 

Education 

Engineering 

Home Economics 

Law 

Nursing 

Pharmacy 

Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

Special and Continuation Studies 

Social Notes 

Completed Careers 



I 



Directory of Advertisers 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md., as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. — $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Member of American Alumni Council. 



lm Geni rai \i i mm Council 

S( 111)1)1 \\1> l 1)1 l l (,i 
Kl fRI WW I //I / S 

u,m< i : ii «i 

\nhur B. Hamilton, '29 
t layton Reynolds, '22 
rbeodore 1 , Bissell, "20 

IITS& SCIENCES 

W. Gilbert Dent.. Jr.. '26 
Ralph G. Shure, '32 
( harles K Merrick, '26 

m mmvs .v i- i h 1 1 1 IkDMINISTBATION 

Hai i \ A. Boswell, Jr.. '42 
Uvin S. Klein. '37 
Egbert F. I ingles. '27 

i. I N I I s I K 1 

Dr. Samuel Bryant, '32 
Dr. Eugene I). Lyon, '38 
Dr. Edwin G. Gail, 'IK 

I 1)1 ( UIDN 

Mrs. John J. Hovert. Jr.. '50 
Judson Bell. '41 
Harry Hasslinger, '33 

I NGINI I kim. 

Emmeit I Dane. '29 
Robert M. Rivello, "43 
Arthur G. VanReuth. '34 

KOMI ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Miriam Beall, '31 

Mrs. Geraldine P. Edwards, '31 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt-Kricker, '31 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, "29 
Benjamin B. Rosenstock, '25 
Layman J. Redden. '34 

MEDIUM 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams. '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno. '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett. 11 

SI USING 

Mrs. Evelyn Koontz Musavi, '53 
Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, '50 
Mrs. Norma Fuller Yeager, '48 

PH A R M AC Y 

Frank Block, '24 
Norman J. Levin, '38 
Gordon Mouat, '37 



ALUMNI ( l.l H REPRESENTATIIES: 
Baltimore — Charles P. Ellinger. '37 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cumberland — H. Reford Aldridge. '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
Frederick Counts 

James F. Zimmerman. '37 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '39 
New England — Georue Kerlejza, '25 
New York— Harold McGay. '50 
Overseas — Col. Edward J. Fletcher. "37 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph Finegold. '34 
Prince Georges — Thomas R. Brooks. '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix. '36 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens. 19 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans. '26 



EX-OH H l(> Ml Mill Rs 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David I . Brigham, '38 

Seen tary- 1 reasurer 
Joseph H. Dcckman, '31, Past President 
I Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 

J. Homer Remsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H Saunders. '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein. 12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer. '17, Past President 
i \ Koons, '2 l >. Past Pn v.dent 
Dr \rthur I. Bell. '19. Past President 







THE ALUMNI DIARY 



DEAR 1 II lOW ALUMNI 

I his is a significant persona! anniversary. Twelve years ago I began my tour 
your Alumni Secretary. You will pardon. I am sure, a little reflection on things 
past as they have brought us to what might well be called the adolescent stage of 
alumni growth. 

We started on February 1. 1947 with an alumni list of 9.000. treasurer's books 
showing a 1946 alumni contribution of S476.00 to the General Association, no 
alumni clubs, a new Maryland Magazine, no Alumni Council, and a supply of in- 
experienced energy. The war years had taken their toll of alumni records, interest 
and organization. 

Upon a foundation of individual school associations and the valuable efforts of a 
number of dedicated alumni who had preceded us. we began the long journey 
through alumni childhood. There were frustrations, heartaches, discouragements 
and uncertainties. It took time to find leadership, to establish a solid organizational 
structure and to rekindle flames of alumni loyalty. From a completely subsidized 
group bound only by our degrees from the University, we developed into an overall 
association backed by individual school associations and financial assistance from 
alumni which made us partially self-supporting and enabled a cooperative and 
continuing joint Alumni-University effort. 

New alumni clubs came into being, alumni membership increased, school associa- 
tions grew and new alumni were added at the rate of about 2.500 per year. Older 
alumni began to let us hear of their locations, activities and succe- 

There have been growing pains and new challenges. The Alumni Council has 
grown in prestige and influence. The alumni publication is self supporting, active 
memberships are constantly increasing and the effort of alumni all over the world 
is keeping pace with growth in other directions. These are encouraging times for 
an Alumni Secretary and for the Alumni Association. The receipt for progress and 
development has included such ingredients as enthusiastic participation on the part 
of hundreds of individual alumni, the financial support of thousands, and strong 
encouragement from the University. To place either the credit for constructive ac- 
complishments or the blame for shortcomings upon the shoulders of a few would 
be a serious mistake. We have all travelled the road together with each making his 
influence felt. Lest we be lulled into a feeling that the accomplishments of the past 
are sufficient for the future. I would like to recall an incident which occurred in the 
life of my boy at the time he was 1 2 years of age. Rapid growth had contributed to 
an awkward and somewhat uncoordinated physical period in his life. We had 
discussed the matter in our family circle following some kidding by other young- 
sters at school. After being reassured he left the dinner table and over his shoulder 
said to his Mother. "I'm really not clumsy am I?" With that he hooked his foot on 
a dining room chair and fell through the doorway into the kitchen. The story ends 
here except to say that he got up laughing and went forward to further growth and 
fine development. 

Certainly you will understand my hopes for the future as we stand on the 
threshold of alumni maturity. Neither will you mind if I ask you to join me in 
this expression of a Happy Anniversary which you have helped make possible. 

As ever. 




^<_ 



David L. Brigham 

Alumni Secretary 




ALUMNI AND CAMPUS NOTES 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



-EBRUARY 

2-6 Registration for the spring se- 
mester. 

Instruction begins. 
Basketball — North Carolina — 
there. 

Basketball — Wake Forest — there. 
Basketball — George Washington 
— there. 

Basketball — North Carolina State 
there. 



9 

4 

7 
10 

14 







MARCH 




16 


Basketball — Clemson — home. 


6-14 


U. T. Production — The Mad 


18 


Basketball — Virginia — there. 




Woman of Chaillot. 


21 


Basketball — North Carolina — 


25 


Maryland Day. 




home. 


26 


Easter recess begins. 


24 


Little Gaelic Singers — Cole Ac- 
tivities Bids. 


31 


Easter recess ends. 


25 


Basketball — Georgetown — there. 






27 


Basketball — South Carolina — 


APRIL 






home. 


May 2\ 


U. T. Production — Kiss Me Kate. 




JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



TELEVISION FACILITY PREVIEWED 

University deans, department heads and 
members of the administration have 
previewed the University's new closed- 
circuit television facility. 

Installation which was completed this 
fall was made possible by a $58,000 
appropriation by the State Legislature 
during the 1958 session. 

A workshop production, entitled "TV 
Showcase." was produced by the Divis- 
ion of Radio and Television, as a dem- 
onstration. A tour of the newly- 
equipped studios located in Woods Hall 
followed the half-hour production. 

"TV Showcase" was viewed on moni- 
tors in four classrooms and in the 
University Theater. The production 
demonstrated ways in which closed- 
circuit television can be utilized in pre- 
paring students for a career in televis- 
ion, how television can be used in teach- 
ing, and how the equipment will be 
utilized as a research instrument. 

Commenting on the closed-circuit 
system. Professor Warren L. Straus- 
baugh. Chairman of the Department of 
Speech and Drama, said that the Uni- 
versity and people of the State can be 
very proud of the new facility as it 
(Continued on next page) 






Alumni and 
( ampus Notes 

( ontinued from page 3 



represents the Litest in modern broad- 
casting installation and production 
equipment. 

"We can duplicate the programming 
of an\ television station and it compares 
favorably with an\ closed-circuit facility 
in the nation." he said. 

TWO M l MM HI CEM RECOGNITION 
I OR ()l ISI \Nl)IN(, WORK 

[*wo University of Maryland alumni 
who presently serve their countr> in 
laboratories of the Potomac River 
Naval Command are the recent recipi- 
ents of awards for superior accomplish- 
ment. 

Mr Harold Bernstein. M.S. Metal- 
lurgy '53, who earned his degree while 
working full time at the U. S. Naval 
Gun Factory, was given a superior Ac- 
complishment Award of $200 for 
"a new procedure which he de- 
vised to eliminate the magnetic 
effects of iron in beryllium-copper 
alloy used for non-magnetic ap- 
plications. The process has saved 
the NGF an estimated $2,518 an- 
nually in the procurement of beryl- 
lium-copper and has also resulted 
in relaxed impurity restrictions." 
Mr. Bernstein is a Materials Engineer 
on the staff of the Naval Gun Factory's 
Engineering Department. 

Mr. William H. Myers. B.S. Biology 
'43, M.S. Zoology '48. received recog- 
nition by being granted a Superior Ac- 
complishment Award of S200 for 
". . . outstanding performance in 
a newly assigned position . . . with 
no indoctrination in the duties, he 
accomplished an enviable produc- 
tion record, completing about 30 
environmental studies in one year 
... in view of the high production 
record and the superior quality oi 
his work . . . this award is made 

Mr. Myers, is a Project Engineer in 
the Oceanographic Publications Branch 
of the Division of Oceanography. Hy- 
drographic Office. The award was made 
bj Rear Admiral H. C. Daniel, the 
Hydrographer. 

PROl ESSOR GRENTZER RECOGNIZED 

Among 17 distinguished alumni recog- 
nized recently by the Carnegie Institute 
of Technology was Miss Rose Marie 
Grentzer. Professor in the University's 



Department ol Music. The occasion 
was the Institute's annual Homecoming 
Luncheon. Miss Grentzer was honored 
as a distinguished teacher who is 
"skilled in the methods of music edu- 
cation with a rare abilit> to communi- 
cate her knowledge and enthusiasm to 
\oung people." She has written articles 
tor the Encyclopedia Americana, and 
is co-author of the Birchunl Music 
Series and the Kindergarten Book. 




Dean Noel E. Foss, School of Pharmacy, 
(left) is presented with an oil portrait by- 
Mr. G. M. Davenport, Jr., a representative 
of Wyeth Laboratories. The portrait, now 
hanging in the main hull of the newly- 
dedicated Dunning Hull, Baltimore cam- 
pus, was a gift of Wyeth Laboratories. 



RECEIVE GRANTS FROM NSF 

The National Science Foundation re- 
cently announced grants to 26 univer- 
sities. Those to the University oi Mary- 
land are listed below according to 
principal scientist, title of project, dura- 
tion of grant, and amount: 

W. J. Bailey. Research Professor. 
Chemistry. "Pyrolysis of Esters." three 
\ears. SI 4.600: Joshua R. C. Brown. 
Associate Professor. Zoology. "Summer 
Institute for High School Teachers of 
Science." six weeks. S3. 650: John R. 
Mayor. Director of Junior High School 
Mathematics Research Study. "A Sum- 
mer Institute on Junior High School 
Mathematics." four weeks. S20.000: E. 
F. Pratt. Professor. Chemistry. "Selec- 
tive Reaction of Organic Compounds 
Absorbed on Solids." one year, SI 1.400: 
Joseph Weber. Professor. Electrical En- 
gineering. "Research in Relativity 
Theory." two years. S8.700. 

ALUMNI RECEIVE FEDERW INTERNSHIPS 

Three alumni have been appointed to 
Management Intern positions in the 
Federal service, following a Federal 
Service entrance examination in which 



competition was extremely keen and 
where appointments are necessarih re- 
stricted. The announcement has just 
been made by the Regional Director of 
the Third United States Civil Service 
Region. The three include: Irving L. 
Becker. Ed '53. of Baltimore, to the 
Department of Health. Education and 
Welfare; Bernard H. Masters. A&S '5"\ 
of College Park, to the Department of 
Labor: and John N. Gentr\. BPA '57, 
of College Park, also to the Depart- 
ment of Labor in the Social Science 
field. 



LIBRARY CO M M I MORATION 
PUBLICATION ISSUED 

A publication commemorating the de- 
dication this summer of the Theodore 
R. McKeldin Library has been issued 
by the Library. 

Titled The University Library and 
the Wise Man. this publication carries 
the complete text of dedicatory ad- 
dresses presented by The Honorable 
Theodore R. McKeldin. Governor of 
the State. 1951-59. and Mr. Verner W. 
Clapp. President of Library Resou 
Inc. The text has been edited by 
Howard Rovelstad. Director of Li- 
braries. 

The University Library and the Wise 
\Uut is in limited edition: compli- 
mentary copies are being distributed to 
key library and education personnel. 
Requests for single copies should be 
directed to Mr. Howard Rovelstad, 
Director of Libraries. Theodore R. 
McKeldin Library. University of Mary- 
land. College Park. Marvland. 

Frank Block, personable President of 
the Alumni Association, commented: 

"The stature of the Alumni Associa- 
tion has increased greatly over the 
years. The University will always find 
the Alumni Association a helpful ad- 
junct in promoting the best interests of 
our Alma Mater. Our constant goal is, 
and must be. to maintain a close rela- 
tionship of understanding service to 
both the University and its alumni." 



LIBRJiK'i PURCHASES RARE COLLECTION 

A collection of rare German. Austrian 
and Bavarian music volumes valued at 
$7,000 has been purchased by the Mc- 
Keldin Librar\. it was announced re- 
cently by Howard Rovelstad. Director 
o\ University Libraries. 

The collection consists of three sets 
and presents the most important mus- 
ical masterpieces of the past ( Middle 
(Continued on page 23) 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Un December 5, Dr. Elkim presented a statement before the Alumni Council designed 
to correct what he termed "misleading slants" on certain key University policies which 
hare recently been the subject of stories in the State and national, press. The statement 
way presented to the 45-member Council at a dinner meeting in the Dining Hall. 

His formal statement was made as an addition to general remarks on University policy 
which had been set as the topic of the discussion some time ago. 

His statement to the Alumni Council follows: 



1 THE CURRENT ADMINISTRATION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 

Maryland is placing increasing emphasis upon scholastic 
attainment by students. It is doing this mainly through the 
mechanism of the so-called new Probation Plan. This does 
|not reflect adversely upon the achievements of past admini- 
strations or upon previous graduates of the University. 

7 FACED WITH NUMEROUS PROBLEMS AND OPPORTUNITIES. 

the selection of specific phases of the University program 
to receive greater emphasis is the continuing duty of each 
administration in its own time. This does not imply that non- 
emphasized phases of the program will be neglected. 

2 THERE ARE EXCELLENT DEPARTMENTAL AND ACADEMIC 

programs at the University which have developed over a 
long period of time. It would be difficult to improve these 
programs in departments beyond normal changes which come 
with our advance in knowledge. 

A IT IS THE POLICY OF THE PRESENT ADMINISTRATION TO 

avoid completely a comparison of the administration of 
one president with that of any previous president since this 
can serve no useful purpose for the University or for society. 
No such comparison has been made by this administration, 
nor will any be made in the future. 

^ AFTER ONE AND ONE-HALF YEARS OF OPERATION OF THE 

Probation Plan, the University of Maryland now holds 
ive ACC Conference titles: in basketball, wrestling, indoor 
track and outdoor track and soccer. During the past five 
y^ears, the number of football grants-in-aid has decreased by 
approximately 149^, while the amount of money involved has 
■emained relatively constant. It is not possible at this point 
o establish any direct relationship between academic stand- 
ards and the number of football games won or lost. 

iANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



/T THE ADMINISTRATION IS AWARE THAT A FEW UNIVERSITIES 

have chosen to make available almost unlimited resources 
for grants-in-aid to football players. However, the University 
of Maryland can not properly engage in this type of a race. 
Rather, it will work through established Conference channels 
to develop comparable attitudes toward this program through- 
out the Conference schools. At the same time, the admini- 
stration will look for good athletic performance just as it looks 
for good performance in every department of the University. 



7 



FROM TIME TO TIME THE UNIVERSITY HAS THE OBLIGATION 

of receiving writers and editors from various publications 
who wish to do stories on some phase of the institution's pro- 
gram. As a public institution, it is the University's policy to 
provide such individuals with facts that are in the public 
domain. In all cases, it is the University's objective to urge a 
positive, constructive tone in such stories which, within the 
bounds of accuracy, will do the most good for all concerned. 
It is recognized, however, that responsibility for how these 
facts are utilized rests with the individual authors and publica- 
tions concerned. 



8. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARY1 AND HAS MADE A LONG AND 

honorable contribution to higher education. It believes 
that its policies in higher education should be continually re- 
examined to change the pattern under which we are now 
working. It also believes that such changes are all a part of 
the normal growth and development of anj institution of 
higher learning. 

q IN ADMINISTERING A SUBSTANTIAL PUBLIC TRUST WHICH 

is answerable in the last analysis only to the broad base 
of citizens and taxpayers at large, the administration welcomes 
constructive comment and criticism from all segments of the 
public. 




All alumnus of IS^7 and his Court. Two "almost queens" tire 
escorted by Grenville Lewis, an early football great at the 
I University. 



Alumni Enthusiasm 
Demonstrated at 
Homecoming 



fill CONTINUING UPSURGE OF ALUMNI ACTIVITY AND ENTHTJ- 

siasm was \isihl\ demonstrated at Homecoming in November. 
Sparked by a see-saw. chiller-diller 10-6 win over South Caro- 
lina, more than 500 alumni, their families and friends packed 
the huge Student Union reception hall for an after-the-game 
repast of hot coffee and pastries. 

Dave Brigham. Executive Director of the Alumni Associa- 
tion, was enthusiastic: 

"The alumni realh came home. Widespread interest and 
growth were never better exemplified. The Chapel service, 
.i football victory and a well-attended mixer made Homecom- 
ing complete." 

T" I I -ING OFF THE FIRST EVENT OF THE DAY WAS THE SECOND 

annual golf driving contest. 9:30-10:30. Winning the men's 
competition again this year was Ray Bellamy. Arts and 



Up In the air on the next step to a .successful Homecoming house 

decoration. 




Sciences '55; winner of the women's competition was Pallid 
M. Berry. Physical Education '58. 

Alumni next offered thanks in the annual alumni service 
in Memorial Chapel: The Rev Merrill W. Drennan. Arts and 
Sciences '49. was minister of the service. 

From luncheon in the dining hall, alumni joined a huge 
Maryland throng (and a few soon-to-be-disappointed rooters 
from South Carolina) at Byrd Stadium to watch a plucky 
Maryland team out-play and out-luck the South Carolinians. 

Near the close of the game the public loud speaker in\ ited 
alumni to warm themselves, meet friends and permit the 
after-game traffic to thin out b\ attending the Alumni Recep- 
tion in the Student Union. Fifteen minutes after the game 
the spacious (46 x 71 -foot) lounge was densely populated. 
The group gathered around the long buffet table on which 
was placed silver coffee serving ware and a number of platters 
containing a variety of pastries. 

The traditional Homecoming Dance staged in the Armory 
hall, capped the day's e\ents. Louis Armstrong pleased the 
estimated 2.000 plus alumni and students attending. 

Crowned Homecoming Queen by Dr. Elkins. was Scarlett 
Frances Voris. a junior representing Alpha Xi Delta. Misi 
\ oris was selected by a panel of judges from five fir 
chosen by the student body from 25 coeds Miss Voris was 
presented a dozen red roses and a silver tra\ inscribed. ■Home- 
coming Queen. 1958." Runners-up finalists were M 
Foster. Delta Delta Delta: Arniui Dell. St. Mary's Hall: 
Barbara Glaser. Delta Gamma: and Bonnie Feldesman. Sigma 
Delta Tau. 

Winning the Homecoming Float Competition was Zeta 
Beta Tau fraternity with an entry titled. "The King and I." 
The scene showed a large gamecock i athletic symbol ot South 
Carolina) bowing to an equally -large crepe-paper terrapin 
on a throne. Each entry took as its theme a Broadway play. 

Second prize went to Sigma Phi Epsilon's "Cleopatra's 
Boat.'' representing the pla>. "Anthony and Cleopatra."' Third 
prize was awarded to lau Kappa Epsilon for their effort. 
"Tribute to Gershwin." 

Prizes were also awarded for house decorations depicting a 
Broadway theme and not exceeding $50. in construction 
cost. First prize in this competition went to Dorchester Hall's 
"Pajama Game." Pi Beta Phi was awarded second prize for 
their funeral scene against the theme "Poor Jud is Dead." title 
ol a song from the pla>. "Oklahoma." Delta Delta Delta's 
"Abstract o\ Musical Instruments." featured a Broadway back- 
ground with a rolling piano keyboard at the base: this decora- 
tion won third prize 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






I- alumni coffee hum 111 i/i, Student 
4 / nmn Ji, h /'(.■(< r/;,//: 500 alumni, theii 
families and friends, aftei the rum, 




Twice a champion. Ray Bellamy, 

Jr. '5?. wins the second alumni 

golf driving competition as lie did 

the first in 1957. Bellamy is a 

former star performer on the 

University golf team. 





"Ovei fifty years ago, son . . ." 
Early football stalwarts Roland 
Harrison '96. and Grenville Lewis 
'97. tell Grenville Lewis. Jr. how 
tough it used to he. 



Homecoming Queen. Scarlett Voris. 









The Gazette 
Is Printed 
'At Home' 








A Paper With 
231 Years 
Of Service 



GLEN BURNIE NEWS 



Our Freedom of the Press Heritage 

B^ Dr. \ i km E. C mn i \is. Professor of History 



HIGH is IMPORTANC1 IMONG IHI ivKlllsi NEWSPAPERS 
ol colonial America was The Maryland Gazette, origi- 
nally published in Annapolis on September 19. 1727. Though, 
in truth, not the first journal oi its kind in the colonies, the 
Gazette was nevertheless one of the great pioneer efforts in 
the history of the American press, and its pages furnish today 
some of the most valuable records in existence of early Mary- 
land. 

Mr. William Parks, the founder of the Gazette, and its first 
publisher and editor, arrived in Annapolis in the year. 1726. 
and immediate!;, became Maryland's "public printer." He had 
previous experience in newspaper work in England, having 
published the Ludlow Postman in 1719. and. in 1723. the 
Weekly Entertainer. What attracted him to the shores of 
Chesapeake Baj was the same lure (as can be inferred from 
man) things he wrote in the Gazette) that had brought, and 
was to continue to bring thousands and then millions of men 
and women to America. — a freer and more challenging life, 
and one of greater opportunities and blessings to human be- 
ings. 

Parks, as the record shows, wasted little time in carving out 
a career for himself: he soon established a reputation destined 
to make him one of the truly great newspaper editors and 
columnists of early America. Even in his own day his talents 
and intellect were appreciated. For example, there was that 
contemporary editor of the Pennsylvania Gazette, the redoubt- 
able Benjamin Franklin, who frequently "lifted" and re- 
published entire columns from the Annapolis paper, written 
presumably by its editor under the general title of "Plain 
Dealer." In turn. Parks did likewise with some of Franklin's 
choice literary efforts. 

As the new "public printer" in 1726. this English im- 
migrant followed several other pioneers of the press in Mary- 
land, who had held this office, the first being William Nuthead. 
Nuthead was appointed in 1686. while the seat of govern- 
ment was still St. Mary's City. After he died in 1694. his wife. 
Dinah, moved the Nuthead press from the old capital to An- 
napolis, and then became possibly "the first woman in British 
America to operate" her own printing establishment.' It is un- 
likely, however, that Dinah Nuthead was ever "public printer." 
for in that same year ( 1696) William Bladen, a clerk of the 
lower house of the Assembly was appointed to the office, and 
brought from England a new press. It was on the "Bladen 
Press." as it came to be called, that the famous edition of the 
I aws of Maryland of 1700 was published. A third press, ap- 
parently operated in this earl) period, was one controlled by 
John Coode and seven other leaders in the 1689 revolution 
against the Proprietor. It was this group that published the 
historic statement of the arguments for the revolutionists, 
entitled The Declaration of the Reasons and Motives tor the 
Appearing in Arms ol their Majesties Protestant Subjects in 
the Province of Maryland. 



\ 



lNNAPOLIS, AT THE BEGINNING Ol 1 HI si C oxi) QUARTER OF 

the eighteenth century, was indeed, a community to inspire 
the hopes and aspiration of the founder of the Gazette. First 



settled near the middle of the seventeenth century, and in 
1726. about seventy-five years old. the town had grown to be 
an influential political capital, as well as one of the most so- 
phisticated centers ol colonial society, located on the beauti- 
ful Severn River and having an excellent harbor for the type 
oi shipping of that day. the three thousand residents oi An- 
napolis were in close contact with most parts of the Ameri- 
can colonies as well as with the West Indies and Europe. The 
local tobacco market was booming, the numerous shops were 
filled with interesting wares, including even luxury goods, and 
generally there was an air of enthusiasm and gaiety. 

The rapid rise of this capital city had come largely after 
the 1690s. when political and economic developments tended 
to shift the emphasis away from the Proprietor and from the 
older rural centers near the Potomac. The original settlers in 
"Providence" or "Arundeltown." as the place had been called, 
were practically all Puritans from Virginia. But that population 
element had long since ceased to be dominant, as wealthy and 
upper class land owners and merchants began to move in and 
to build substantial, and. in many cases, elaborate town houses, 
which they filled with elegant and costly furnishings and bric- 
a-brac from all over the world. Here, annually, during the 
height oi the social season, they entertained on a scale more 
lavish, and more hospitable than anywhere else in America, 
except possibly at Charleston and Williamsburg. 



T„, 



JE ECONOMIC BASIS OF 1 1M IN lNNAPOLIS WAS OF COURSB 

still chiefly the tobacco business with its plantation and 
its slaves. But it would be a mistake to overlook the effect of 
the rapid growth of the upper Bay region and of more western 
parts of the colony, which tended to shift emphasis to new 
economic interests. For these new trends. Annapolis was more 
suitably located than St. Marys City to take advantage of 
every condition of growth. In fact, by 1725. the earlier com- 
petition between the two places was largely a thing of the past; 
the new capital had grown and would continue to grow, while 
its ancient rival was now fast becoming a forgotten "ghost" 
town. 

Cosmopolitan this colonial port on the Severn unquestion- 
ably was. with a pride in its achievements and a sense of 
destiny, which its fine brick buildings and bustling Chesapeake 
Bay commerce certainly appeared to justify. But there were 
other features of its already complex society that deserve con- 
sideration, such as the relatively high educational level of its 
inhabitants, the easy manners and fine dress of its substantial 
aristocracy and their high standards of living. There, also, 
was a marked similarity to the English culture of the period, 
probably more so than almost anywhere else in America. The 
greater part of its superlatively -trained lawyers as well 
substantial number oi its upper classes had been sent to 
England to be educated. Likewise, its theatres, and other 
elements of its culture were, for the most part, borrowed 
from England, including the names ol its principal streets 
(Gloucester. Hanover. King George and Prince George), its 
religions i especially the Church of England I. its architecture, 
its books and its music. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



w, 



,11 n mi Gazette pirsi appeared in 1727. u immedi- 
atelj became verj popular, reflecting, as it did, the lite and 
the thinking of its readers. [Tie novelt) ol this first "weekly" 
newspapei in Maryland ol course accounts to some extent foi 

its enthusiastic reception; but its generally excellent literary 
aiul editorial qualities and tone were Calculated to create a 
more enduring appeal. 

William Parks was a keen student ot Ins times, and. despite 
the tact that he was a comparative newcomer in the com- 
munis, his deep insight into the economic, political, moral 
and religious problems of his day. and the high level of his 
writing and craftsmanship soon made him a marked figure 
in journalistic and intellectual circles. Moreover the editor, 
drawing from his previous publishing experience in England, 
introduced two innovations in the Gazette, which are of a 
good deal of interest to students of journalism. The first of 
these was "the technique of giving" a special but permanent 
heading "to his periodical essays." such as the "Plain Dealer." 
The "Plain Dealer" (probably, for the most part. Parks him- 
self) dealt with a wide variety of timely topical themes, and it 
is hardly an exaggeration to say that he thus became the first 
newspaper columnist in American history. This idea of a reg- 
ular "column" was copied shortly by Franklin in the "Busy- 
Body" essays in the Pennsylvania Gazette, and thereafter by 
many others. 

A second innovation, also derived, perhaps, from such 
English publications as the Spectator, was the use of the full 
length fable, legend, fairy tale, and allegory as disguises, with 
which to deal with specific problems and to campaign against 
all manner of evils and vices. Thus one story, on December 
10. 1728, used the traditional "Man of Laws Tale" by 
Chaucer, in which to depict the cruel conflict between a beau- 
tiful but vain young bride and her not so beautiful mother-in- 
'law. The obvious lessons to be drawn were several, and their 
possible application to certain individuals in the Annapolis 
society of that day offer some interesting grounds for specula- 
tion. For. as Parks adapted the Chaucer story, the beautiful 
bride from her prison cell was given the opportunity to return 
home "as a shepherdess" with "an ugly face, but with a con- 
tented heart." On another occasion and in somewhat similar 
'fashion, the Gazette told the allegorical story of the spring- 
time wooing of a lovely maiden, the scene being a meadow 
filled with gorgeous flowers. Herein, the conversational pieces 
between the lovers suggested the importance of reason, and of 
virtue, while sternly enjoining against giving way to less com- 
mendable conduct. 

Poetry, too, found ready acceptance in the Gazette, much 
in the same way in which it was then popular in England. 
Idyllic love might sometimes provide the theme — just as in 
prose fables, fairy tales and allegories. But there were other 
subjects, some of them stemming from actual historical events 
— "The Suppression of the Late Rebellion" (contributed by 
President Blair of William and Mary College), and a "Moun- 
tain Expedition into Western Virginia" (by Professor Black- 
more). 

• It would be a mistake to assume that the Gazette was 
given over purely to philosophical and moralistic literary ef- 
forts. The issue of March 4, 1729, described a birthday cele- 
bration in Annapolis in honor of "Our most Gracious Queen 
Caroline." with a grand dinner and ball at the State House, 
to which "his excellency Benedict Leonard Calvert, Our 
Governor, invited the gentlemen of the city." Another piece 
on December 31, 1728, told of a murder of a certain Mr. 
Acquilla Hall, who, on Christmas morning "was unfortunately 
shot to death" by one of his negro slaves. The slave had 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



escaped "some tunc before, .nui la) m ambush to execute his 
barbarous" <\c\\ 

Naturall) enough, the Gazette devoted much space to the 
tobacco business. Difficulties between Maryland planters and 
the "factors" or "brokei commission" men. representing them 
in England, was a frequent theme Editoi I'.uks. whose 
sympathies la> larger) with the planters in the unequal con- 
test with their brokers and creditors, nevertheless tried bard 
to preserve an impartial air and to present all sides ol the 
matter. Even the poet-contnbutors to the Gazette sometimes 
wrote about tobacco. Ebene/er Cooke, son ot an English sea 
captain, and a resident for a short time in Maryland stirred up 
a great deal of interest with a poem, entitled "The Sot-Weed 
Factor." in which he depicted with critical disapproval the 
crudeness of local conditions in the tobacco industry. Cooke 
had been a deputy receiver general for the Proprietor. His 
poem was written in 1 708. but was not published in the 
Gazette until 1731. 

Closely related to the problems in the tobacco controversy, 
and suggesting even at this early period the coming American 
Revolution were the already angry squabbles between the 
colonies and mother country over taxation, paper money and 
general colonial responsibility for participating in defense 
measures against Indians and French. It was Parks* policy 
to keep his readers fully informed about these developments, 
without too much show of partisanship. Thus he re-printed 
Benjamin Franklin's Modest Enquiry into the Nature and 
Necessity of a Paper Currency, as well as excerpts from time 
to time from other colonial papers, especially from those in 
Boston. 

Attractive and even sparkling as the Maryland Gazette was 
under the leadership of William Parks, it was destined to go 
the way of many colonial papers: in 1735 its initial span of 
life was over, due largely to insufficient financial support. 
Meanwhile Parks had found a new haven in Virginia and then 
in England. So. during the next ten years (1735 to 1745), 
Maryland was without a newspaper. When, in 1745. the 
Gazette was revived, it was under "new management." This 
second period of its history was to continue for more than 
thirty years — in fact to the year. 1777: and. after a short 
hiatus, due to the War, it would be again revived in a third 
period, extending to 1839. s 

notes: 

1 There is a possibility that William Nuthead. the first "public printer." maj 
have himself moved his press from St. Mary's City to Annapolis prior to 
his death. However, that theory has never been substantiated conclusively. 
- It is of interest to note that a very flourishing weekly newspaper, designated 
as the Maryland Gazette: Glen Burnie News, is currently published by the 
Capital Gazette Press and Speer Publications, of which the Honorable Talbot 
T. Speer is President and Publisher and the Honorable Elmer M. Jackson. Jr. 
is Vice-President and General Manager. The modern Gazette's banner on its 
editorial page carries the words: "America's Oldest Newspaper Founded in 
1727." Both Mr. Speer and Elmer M. Jackson. Ill (the editor) are alumni ol 
the University of Maryland, while Mr. Elmer M. Jackson. Jr. has been 
Chairman of the University's Advisory Committee on Journalism since the 
inception of the Department of Journalism. A useful Souvenir Pamphlet 
Tracing the History and Modern Aims of the Gazette was issued, in 1958. 
by the Capital Gazette Press. 



Talbot T. Speer (center), publisher of the Annapolis Capital- 
Gazette Press, Inc., presented the 1V58 National Newspaper Week 
address this fall at the University. The speech. "The Press Fights 
Dictatorship." was sponsored by the Maryland Press Association 
and the Department of Journalism and Public Relations. Mr. 
Speer was introduced by Elmer M. Jackson III (left), editor of 
the Maryland Gazette and Glen Burnie News. Alfred Crowed 
(right), Head of the Department, presided at the meeting of faculty 
and students. 




1 ' ■ 



iizmarzu oil 




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'Pharmacy's Dunning Hall' 
Dedicated in December 

Dinning hall, nlw building housing thl school of 
Pharmacy, uas formally dedicated December 4. The building 
was named in honor of Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, an alumnus 
of the School nationally known for his contributions to phar- 
maceutical chemistry and for his development of therapeutic 
aids for the health sciences. 

Dunning Hall is located on the Baltimore campus facing 
Lombard St.: to its left is the new School of Nursing Build- 
ing soon to be formally dedicated, to its right is Kell\ 
Memorial. 

Dunning Hall is constructed of reinforced concrete faced 
with brick and ornamented uith limestone and granite. Its 
basement provides an area for the teaching of manufacturing 
pharmacy, an air-conditioned lecture room, as well as locker 
rooms, snack bar. and bookstore. The first floor accom- 
modates the administrative offices of the School, individual 
offices for staff members, a small museum, a room for a 
model drug store, two pharmacy teaching laboratories and a 
stock room, and a laboratory for pharmaceutical research. 
The second floor provides a teaching laboratory, a stock 
room, a research laboratory . and individual offices for the 
Departments of Pharmacognosy. Pharmacolog> . Physiolog) 
and Zoolog) . 

Dunning Hall is so constructed that three additional floors 
ma\ be constructed on top of the present structure. 

In his introductory rlnivkks ih \n or rm school of 
Pharmac\ Noel E. Foss. touched on the early histor) of the 
School and some of the men who aided in its development 

"The School of Pharmacj of the University of Maryland, 
came into existence nearh one hundred rwent) >ears ago 
as the Maryland College of Pharmacy. 

"Like all educational institutions initiated and supported b> 



lO 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



individual effort," Dean loss said, "the School ol Pharmacy 
h.is had its trials and tribulations. I he conditions and in 
Buences which have retarded us normal development .it dif- 
ferent times have been both numerous and varied; but the 
handicap from which it has suffered most severely and mosl 
frequent!) in the past has been the lack ol adequate quarters 
m which to carrj on its program. 

"For the first thirty-five years ol us existence, the college 
moved about the cit>. occupying rented quarters. In IS76 it 
purchased a grammar school building located at Aisquith 
neai Fayette Streets, which site it continued to occupy foi 

more than a quarter of a century. In 1886 the old structure 
was torn down and replaced In a new and more commodious 
building. This building was disposed of in 1904 when the 
college amalgamated with the other professional schools ol 
the old University of Maryland and moved to 27 South 
Greene Street. Here the college obtained quarters sufficiently 
Luge to meet its immediate needs, but this condition did not 
endure tor long. The additional space required by the dif- 
ferent schools to meet the constantly advancing standards in 




i nveiling the dedicatory plaque are, left to right: President 
Elkins, Gov. McKeldin, Mr. McCormick, Dr. Dunning and Dr. 
Zopf. 



professional education and the increase in enrollment soon 
brought on an overcrowded condition which again made 
necessary the occupancy of rented quarters in which to carry 
on a portion of its work. In 1929. the State appropriated 
moneys for a new building which was dedicated on May 10, 
1930, and which provided more adequate facilities for the 
Schools of Pharmacy and Dentistry. Progress in the form 
of increased enrollment, rapid expansion of our graduate 
program and research again necessitated additional facilities. 
Our search has been partially answered in the School of 
Pharmacy's new building at 636 West Lombard Street which 
has been so constructed that it can be expanded in the 
future by the erection of three additional floors. For its 
existence we are indebted to many, and I want to take this 
opportunity to thank you. Governor McKeldin, the members 
of the Legislature, and the many others who assisted in 
promoting this project, for your appreciation of the value of 
good pharmaceutical service for the State, and for providing 
the facilities necessary to educate and train young men and 
women to give such service. A school is more than a build- 
ing, and the facilities we are dedicating today represent not 
only the achievements of the present time, but the work, the 
hope, and the aspirations of the many men and women who 
preceded me in building up this fine institution. Some of 
these persons are mere names to us but the memory of others 
is a living one in the hearts of many present today — Dr. 
Caspari. Dr. Kelly, and Dr. DuMez. It is always with a 



11 II J 





Dr. Dunning presents Ins remarks at dedication ceremonies which 

were' convened in the Auditorium of the Psychiatric Institute, 

Baltimore campus. Sealed left to right on the speakers' platform 
are: Dean FoSS, Dr. Zopf, Gov. A/< Kcldin. /'resident l.lkins. Mr. 
McCormick. The Rt. Reverend Hans l.cc Doll. Bisho/) Coadjutor 
of the Diocese of Maryland of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 
ami Mr. Alvin Auhinoe. member of the University Board of 
Regents. 



sense of regret on occasions of this kind that people who 
have given so much to an institution cannot share its latest 
triumph." 

DR. It KINS, STATING THE I'URPOSI Ol llll OCCASION, ki - 

marked upon the excellent facilities offered by the new 
building, and mentioned those who played a part in bringing 
it into being. 

The Honorable Theodore R. McKeldin, Governor of the 
State of Maryland. 1951-1959, briefly traced the history of 
pharmacy through the ages. 

"Since natural cravings first sent a prehistoric man to seek 
a certain root to ease his miseries, the search for ingredients 
to add to human health and the ease of living has played a 
major role in man's existence," the Governor remarked. 

'"Today the discovery and preparation of medicinal in- 
gredients and combinations is a great science, closely allied 
with those of the physician and the surgeon. 

"Indeed the work of the physician seldom is effective until 
the pharmacist performs his service, and the aftercare of 
surgery's beneficiary depends extensively, too, on the man 
or woman in the apothecary shop. 

"The science of drugs, of course, has gone well beyond 
the fields of cure and alleviation of the ill. Among its accom- 
plishments in our times are great advances in the prevention 
of disease. 

"Despite the great strides that have been made in medi- 



Representatives of organizations contributing to the purchase of 
the plaque are. left. Mr. Frank Block. President of the University 
of Maryland Alumni Association and the Maryland Pharmaceu- 
tical Association, and. right. Mr. A. J. Ogrinz. President of the 
Baltimore Metropolitan Pharmaceutical Association. Missing be- 
cause of illness was Mr. Samuel Portney. President of the School 
of Pharmacy Alumni Association, whose organization also con- 
tributed to the purchase of the plaque. 




JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



1 1 




Ill \ \l.\(, II 1/ / 



cine, we, as a forward looking people, must assume that the 
surface barely has heen scratched. 

"We must look, inspired b) the examples of the past, to 
tar greater accomplishments in the future- miracles of medi- 
cine that will far outshine the miracle drugs of the present. 

"Regardless ot what great, mysterious rays of light or 
atmospheric elements may be employed for the direct attack 
on malignant destroyers, we can be sure that the medicines 
of the pharmaceutical chemists will have their role in the 
eventual conquest. 

" I here are the various ills of heart and blood vessels — 
leading killers of today — that await conquest by surgery and 
medicine. 

" I here are other ills of humanity that thus far have defied 
our finest skills, but none have brought surrender. 

"The great battle will go on, and much of it will be fought 
in the laboratories and hospitals of our Universities. 

"Baltimore, of course, is one of the world's great medical 
centers. 

"It is proper, and indeed essential, that this great Uni- 
versitj oi the State of Maryland should have this fine new 
Pharmacy Building among its professional schools in the 
City oi Baltimore. 

"Soon I shall retire from the Governorship of Maryland 
after a very satisfying eight years, thanks to the excellent 
cooperation of the various Departments and Institutions of 
the State. 

"I shall look back with pride on many accomplishments 
of this Administration, and standing out among them will 
be this fine Pharmacy Building. 

"But you who use it will not be looking back. 

"We will dedicate it today, and you will dedicate it every- 
day to the future in the cause of human health and 
happiness." 

L)r. (IIXKIIS P, MCCORMICK, CHAIRMAN OF THK BOARD OF 

Regents, in the formal dedication of the new building, re- 
marked upon the distinguished career of Dr. Dunning. 

"Pharmacj is one of the honored professions that has 
come down to us in a direct line from ancient times. 
Through the Ages, Pharmacy has developed as a science in 
response to the needs of the people of the World. It has 
met these needs with service — service that has marched in 
step with other health sciences to give Man a new span of 
years m his lifetime, and to banish a dozen major diseases 
that formerlj took millions of lives. 

"Needs and services, these are the ke\ words that applv 
here todaj as we meet to dedicate a beautiful and needed 
building, and commend it to service Oil behalf of our Mary- 
land citizens. 

"These same ke\ words are uppermost as we turn to the 
distinguished gentleman philanthropist and world leader in 
pharmaceutical science lor whom this building will be named. 
His career is rich in service to Mankind. I he list of his 
achievements far too long to recount here in full detail — 

12 



prove beyond doubt that he is needed by the people of 
Maryland and by the nation. 

"Dr. Henry Armitt Brown Dunning is a native Mary- 
lander. Born in Denton, he came to Baltimore with Downes 
Brothers, druggists, in 1X93 to begin his career as a 
Baltimorean. 

"I hat career, over nearly seven decades, has found him 
taking a degree from the Maryland College of Pharmacy, 
pioneering in research at Johns Hopkins Hospital and Medi- 
cal School, volunteering service in the Spanish-American 
War, receiving a host of honorary degrees from colleges and 
universities both in and out of Maryland, serving the Amer- 
ican Red Cross in Baltimore as Chairman of the Surgical 
Supplies Division; lending his guidance to development of the 
National Fellowship Plan at Johns Hopkins University, 
giving his executive talents to a score of philanthropic and 
service committees, and presiding over the American Founda- 
tion for Pharmaceutical Education. 

"The Kelly Memorial Building Project on this campus was 
completed by a committee under his chairmanship. 

"The University of Maryland has been particularly favored 
to have his services as Associate Professor of Chemistry in 
the School of Pharmacy for twelve years. The State re- 
members him as president of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association. 

"To recognize effectivelj so main decades of unselfish and 
devoted service is no easy task, but it becomes my special 
pleasure at this time, acting for the Board of Regents of the 
University of Maryland, to unveil this plaque dedicating the 
Pharmacy Building to future decades of service in spirit of 
achievement symbolized by the man for whom it is named — 
Dr. Henry Armitt Brown Dunning." 

Mr. McCormick then read the inscription of the bronze 
plaque to be installed as a memorial of the dedication. 

Responding ro mr. mccormick's words, dr. dunning 
said: 

"I take this opportunity to express my deepest appreciation 
to the President of the University of Maryland. Dr. Wilson 
H. Elkins. and the Board of Regents of the Universitv of 
Maryland on account of the dedication of the new pharmacy 
building in my honor. I have naturally been interested in 
pharmacy and chemistry and have for a long time realized 
that pharmacy, as an important member of the health team — 
medicine, dentistry and nursing, must fulfill the educational, 
scientific and cultural requirements of the health professions 

"The great advances in pharmaceutical education, especially 
in recent years, are a result in a substantial degree of the 
activities of the American Pharmaceutical Association, the 
activities of the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education, financial and otherwise, and the implementation 
of our seventy-four schools of pharmacy throughout the 
nation. I hese activities and programs clearly indicate that 
pharmacy is keeping pace with medicine, dentistrv and 
nursing in promoting better health practices and services. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 












"You will realize that the new Pharmacy Building which 
you will inspect today is a fine now structure, splendidly 
well equipped for teaching and training purposes, such as we 
pharmacists of Maryland have not bad before, it will re- 
quire additional floors in the future when the very impressive 

Chemistr) and physics laboratories, which are now separated, 
will he imposed upon the present structure Even now. dur- 
ing your inspection, you will recognize the potentials of our 
teaching facilities and will he impressed with the laboratories 
and equipment. 

"It is obvious that the graduates of this school are 
thoroughly well-trained to serve the public, not only as re- 
tail pharmacists, but that their scientific training equips them 
for service in pharmaceutical industry which has been in a 
large measure responsible tor the effective discoveries through 
research made available to the medical practitioner. 

"Most of the tamed pharmaceutical research institutions 
in this country were founded and developed by retail phar- 
macists, graduates of our pharmacy colleges, notably Eli Lilly 
& Company, Indianapolis. Parke. Davis & Company. Detroit, 
and Sharp & Dohmc. of Baltimore, to name only a few. 
The founders of Sharp & Dohme were graduates of this 
school and in the beginning conducted a retail pharmacy for 
some years. The Dohmes were very active in promoting the 
progress of our school of pharmacy over a considerable 
period of time during the earlier years of the school's activi- 
ties. 1 hey were members of the Board of Directors and 
devoted much time and attention to the affairs of the school. 

"You will realize that the practicing pharmacist in your 
neighborhood is thoroughly well-educated, scientifically 
trained, and that he is a professional man, an honored mem- 
ber of the health body. 

"You will understand that many of the alumni of this 
School are outstanding representatives of national and local 
leadership in all phases of pharmaceutical practice — in the 
industry, education, research, pharmaceutical journalism. For 
more than a century the Maryland College of Pharmacy has 
ranked high among the first in pharmaceutical education and 
training, and still does. This school, the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland, has had a great history and 
is assured of a great future." 

At the conclusion of Dr. Dunning's response, the audience, 
accompanied by a console organ, sang, "My Maryland". 

The principal address was delivered by dr. louis c. 
Zopf. President of the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. 

"I welcome the opportunity to be with you today and to 
participate in the dedication of a new home for the School 




-MB 

Refreshments were served in the newly-dedicated Dunning Hall 
following the formal ceremonies. 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



ol Pharmacy," Dr. Zopl said "I congratulate the people nt 
Maryland, the Board ol Regents, the l niversity administra 

(ion. and the s(. ill ol the School ol Pharmacy loi iheu p. ill 

m planning and bringing to fruition this structure which will 
assine Maryland ol a position ol continued prominence in 
the field oi pharmaceutical education, Maryland now joins 
the several other universities who have recently expanded then 
facilities for the teaching ot Pharmacy at the undergraduate 
and graduate levels. 

"Pharmacy has been so concerned with its own problems 
professionally and economically thai we have been delayed 

in evaluating the intellectual qualifications Ol the total person 
representing the profession. I he basic purpose ol higher 
education is to improve the individual culturally ami intel- 
lectually, as well as professionally; education should furnish 
the individual with a depth of understanding so that he may 
be more helpful to and more comfortable in modern society. 
It was quite some time before we of the United States came 
to recognize that education is not a terminal process and that 
continuing education after graduation grows commensurately 
with the expansion of knowledge and the increase in the 
complexity of human life. Regardless of how much formal 
education an individual may have had before undertaking his 
life work, regardless of its quality, it will be incomplete at the 
time of graduation. President F. H. Horn of the Universit\ 
of Rhode Island expresses the view, "A truly liberal edu- 
cation is the product of a lite time of learning, study, reflec- 
tion. Even then few people attain it. The best a college can 
do is to lay the foundation for a liberal education, to inculcate 
the habits of mind, breadth of interest, enlargement of spirit, 
which, when continued and enriched during the later years, 
can result in a true liberal education.' 

"Pharmaceutically speaking, we have come a long way 
from wahoo bark, pipsiszewa, and sarsaperilla. We have 
traveled through the era of the sulfa drugs, the amphetamines, 
the vitamins, to the era of antibiotics and now the tran- 
quillizing drugs. These substances have become available 
through additive pharmaceutical chemical, biological knowl- 
edge, and because of man's insatiable curiosity and desire 
to understand the unknown. Many of these substances have 
been with us in masqueraded form awaiting a denuding to 
reveal their true worth. 

"Pharmaceutical progress has been materially fortified 
through the advances of the basic sciences which, in them- 
selves, have been instrumental in explaining the chemistry 
of life. It is impossible to exaggerate pharmaceutical progress. 
Radio-isotopes are with us and are already proving their 
merit in the 'where' and 'how' certain therapeutic agents 
aid in the function of the normal cell. But much still remains 
to be known. For example, the biosynthetic products of 
micro-organism — namely the antibiotics — are still accepted 
with caution because of incomplete understanding of their 
action on the tissue. The addrogens, for example, have a 
retarding effect upon the growth of cancerous tissues, but just 
how these work still bears study. 

"We are most fortunate to have educational centers such 
as this campus and others of similar design. Here general 
education furnished the base for the development of special- 
ized training; here pharmaceutical research can share with 
all avenues of science and clinical investigation. Dunning 
Hall affords physical facilities for the training of pharma- 
ceutical personnel and pharmaceutical research which must 
become a part of improved medical therapy and expansion 
of the comforts of American society. The men and women 
of Dunning Hall will contribute to the greatest challenge 
of all. namely", building better pharmaceuticals for the 
welfare of all of mankind." 

13 




Fund Victory Dinner Points Way to 1959 Campaign; 
White Engineering Fellowship and Loan Plan Established 



A I A \l( lom DINNER COMMEMORATING THE COMPLETION OF 

the first annual roll call for the Greater University of Mary- 
land Fund. Dr. Albert E. Goldstein. Chairman of the Fund, 
presented a full report concerning the successful campaign. 

Dr. Goldstein said that the success of the 1958 Alumni 
Fund Program is a motivating factor behind the enthusiasm 
evidenced as the 1959 program gets under way. The En- 
dowment Office reported that during 1958. the Greater Uni- 
versity ol Maryland Fund received in cash and pledges 
$117,810. This figure is the amount received to September 
1. 1958: thereafter gifts will be credited to the 1959 program. 

Of the contributions. $2,500 went to the library project. 
$12,080 to scholarships. $21,715 to special projects (in- 
cluding faculty development programs, the heritage fund, 
and student aid), and approximately $81,500 for furnish- 
ings for the Baltimore Union Building. 

Dr. Goldstein acknowledged the important support given 
by Dr. Elkins throughout the campaign. The Nursing faculty 
was singled out for special commendation for their one hun- 
dred percent participation in the Fund. He also commended 
the public relations support of the Office of University Rela- 
tions, and the Office of Alumni Relations. 

Dr. Elkins commented on the "wonderful job" of Dr. 
Goldstein throughout the Fund campaign. Dr. Elkins urged 
the participation of greater number of alumni in the 1959 
campaign and pointed to the "great work ahead of us." in 
providing the continuing alumni support of the University as 
it strives to serve well an increasing number of individuals. 

Goals oi rm 1959 ( impaign arc to double the number 
of workers participating in the Fund and to double the 
number of contributors. Dr. Goldstein said. 

In 1959, the Fund program calls for completion of the 
Baltimore Union project, a flexible program of student aid 
designed to assist students of all schools and colleges on the 
most effective basis, a library fund for both the new College 
Park and Baltimore libraries, and a new faculty projects fund. 

I he annual alumni roll call will be preceded by special gifts 
solicitation. There will be monthly direct mail appeals starting 
m January, followed by a regional General Canvass in March 
And April. 

Vs m 1958, the General Chairman for 1959 is Dr. Gold- 
stem He is assisted h\ Dr. John Krant/. Hon. 1 eon H. A. 



Pierson. Dr. George Anderson. Thomas Beam. Howard 
Filbert and Ronald O'Connor as a Planning Committee. All 
were active in the 1958 program. The Board of Governors 
of the Fund is comprised of the Regional Managers and 
Special Gifts Committeemen. 

In the 1958 program more than 1.000 alumni acted as 
Regional Managers and District Representatives and calls 
were made on over 10.000 alumni in the course of the Gen- 
eral Canvass. Alumni of all schools and colleges joined in 
this effort and the spirit of cooperation was responsible for 
much of the success of the program according to Dr. 
Goldstein. 

Mr. AND MRS. CHARLES M. WHITE ( MR. WHITE IS AN ALUMNI I 

of the University. Engineering T3). of Cleveland. Ohio, have 
made two major contributions through the Greater University 
of Maryland Fund of approximately $10,000 each to establish 
the "Helen B. and Charles M. White Engineering Fellowship 
and Loan Plan." Mr. White is Chairman of the Board of the 
Republic Steel Corporation. 

Essential!) the plan is designed for faculty development 
primarily through encouragement of research and completion 
of graduate work. 

Eligible are (in order of preference) members of the 
faculty of the College of Engineering for the terminal year's 
stud) tor the doctorate, engineering alumni of the Universit] 
for graduate study beyond the master's degree, and other 
graduate students of outstanding promise who will pursue 
teaching and research in colleges of engineering. 

The plan calls for loans of approximately the amount of 
the staff member's salary with repayment credits depending 
upon the scholarly production and advances made by the 
recipient. One of the contingencies of the plan is that the 
faculty member must remain in teaching. 

Dean of the College of Engineering. Theodore T. Mavis, 
stated that. "This is one of the most promising programs for 
faculty development in engineering education today. It is 
tailor-made for our situation and will enable us to compete 
for the best calibre of faculty personnel — and for results — 
with the outstanding engineering colleges of the country. As 
ever-increasing burdens are imposed upon our engineering 
faculties, we must encourage them to carry their professional 
advancement as far as possible. This is done in a practical 
manner by Mr. White's program." 






14 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



THE CHILDREN'S REMEDIAL FITNESS CLINIC 








In march of 1958 the children's remedial fitness clinic was instituted by 
the College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health. The first Clinic session 
was conducted during a six-week period on Saturday mornings; and since the pro- 
gram appeared to be successful in terms of its stated objectives, it has now been set 
up on a continuing basis with an eight-week session scheduled each semester. 

The functions of the Clinic, like those of the College, are three-fold — that is, 
to provide: ( 1 ) training for students majoring or minoring in this College or related 
fields; (2) research which will light the way to improved programs; and (3) service 
to University students and, more generally, to the State of Maryland. 

(Continued on next page) 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1959 



15 




Although children must have medical 
clearance to participate in the Clinic. 
the> are referred b) special education 
groups. optometrists. psychologists, 
physical educators, speech therapists. 
and pediatricians I bese children have 
one thing in common. Whether the\ 
are hrain damaged. mentall) retarded. 
epileptic, orthopedicall) or physical!) 

handicapped. cmotionalh disturbed, or 
in other respects entirely normal or 
even superior. the\ ha\e some fitness 
and or coordination problem. 

Dr. Warren R. Johnson. Director of 
the Clinic, came to the University in 
1950 as an Associate Professor in the 
College of Physical Education. Recrea- 
tion and Health: he received full pro- 
fessional rank in 1953. Born in Denver. 
Colorado. Dr. Johnson attended the 
public schools in that cits and received 
both his bachelor of arts ( Phi Beta 
Kappa) and master of arts from the 
University of Denver. Dr. Johnson 
served during World War Two as a 
Marine Corps fighter pilot with the 
rank of First Lieutenant. Prior to his 
appointment at the University of Mary- 
land. Dr. Johnson was a teaching fellow 
at Boston University, teaching health 
and physiology and serving as coach of 
the wrestling team: he received his doc- 
torate of education from that institution. 

Dr. Johnson is a co-author of four 
college-level textbooks and has volun- 
tarily served for a number of years with 
various youth organizations and modi- 
fied remedial fitness programs. 

He and his wife and child are resid- 
ing in Aldelphi. 

In many cases the fitness problem 
of the children is general. Such children 
become fatigued very easily, they walk 
and run awkwardly, their balance is 
poor, they are unable to throw, catch 
or bounce balls: and more demanding 
activities, such as rope skipping, rope 
climbing, pull-ups on the bar. and so 
on. are simply out of the question for 
them. They frequently have speech 
and or vision problems. In most cases 
of this kind, organized group activities 
such as games cannot be utilized in the 
Clinic program. Even though a child 
may be able to grasp the idea of a game, 
his past attempts to pla> organized 
games have usually not been rewarding: 
his failure to keep up with his group 
has led to rejection and ridicule b\ 
other children of his age. with the result 
that he is likely to be more or less 
sociall) handicapped. For this reason 
all student clinicians are assigned to a 
single child for an hour session of ac- 
tivities, and group activities are not 
attempted until a solid basis of physical 




THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



fitness and skill have been established. 

Ihus group activities are i.iiclv at- 
tempted before the last few weeks of a 
clime session, and in sonic cases they 
arc not attempted at all. 

On the other hand, some children 
who are referred to the Clinic arc en- 
tirely normal except foi a specific symp- 
tom such as poor manual coordination 
leg. inability to write or manipulate 
small objects), overweight, lack of sta- 
mina and ignorance of basic skills usu- 
alh required in pla> and sports. Some 
normal children literally have to be 
taught to walk properly 

Tut l 1 1N1CIANS WHO WORK WITH I III 

children are volunteer students o( the 
College of Physical Education, Recrea- 
tion and Health who have achieved at 
least junior standing. Some are gradu- 
ate students. Their preparation has in- 
cluded course work in anatomy, physi- 
ology, kinesiology (analysis of bodily 
movement), theory of fitness and exer- 
cise, and human development. Staff 
meetings are held prior to the opening 
of each eight-week Clinic session and at 
least one staff meeting is held during 
each week of the program. These staff 
meetings are devoted to orientation to 
the objectives and special methods and 
procedures of the Clinic, study of eval- 
uation techniques to be employed to 
determine status and progress of the 
children, and discussion of individual 
cases. Specialists from various fields 
participate as consultants in these meet- 
ings. 

To students, parents and other inter- 
ested persons Dr. Johnson summarizes 
the intent of the program in the follow- 
ing terms: 

"In the Clinic we are interested in 
improving certain aspects of the 'total 
fitness for living' of children who are 
referred to us. Our approach is primar- 
ily in terms of physical activity, through 
which the child may: (1) gain greater 
awareness of and confidence in his body 
and what he can do with it; (2) acquire 
; and/or improve basic skills which not 
only increase the range of his movement 
capabilities and satisfactions but also 
heighten his ability to function effective- 
ly in the activities of other children and 
thus provide a basis for the acquisition 
of greater social skill; and (3) increase 
the basic efficiency, stamina and power 
of his body-machine. 

"Physical and social values of these 
kinds are not hard to demonstrate as 
children become physically educated; 
(but we also attach importance to an- 
other closely related value which is, 
perhaps, harder to demonstrate but is 
certainly not less important. That is. 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 






we believe thai as .1 child sees himsell 
become more able i>> do things, more 
able to direct and control ins body, and 
more able to deal with his peers on 

theil own level, he gains .1 new lespeU 
lor himsell I he picture he has of 
himself in his own mind undergoes 
change tor the better not through sell 

deception but through the objective data 
oi performance. He begins to see him- 
sell as one who can deal more adequate 
is and confidently with Ins hie. (In the 

Clinic program some tests are given 
which, we believe, may demonstrate 1111 
provement in these children's 'self-pic- 
ture' as their performance level rises. | 

"We attach the greatest importance to 
our student clinicians. These mature 
young men and women arc expected to 
establish a friendly relationship with 
their children in order to obtain the 
best possible performance from them, 
study their children for their abilities 
and interests, and guide them through 
sequences of activities which are geared 
to what they can do and what they can 
learn to do. The clinicians are especially 
trained as physical and/or health educa- 
tors. They are aware that it is not their 
function to make their children depend- 
ent upon them for continued develop- 
ment of fitness, but to help the children 
and their parents to become increasingly- 
able to continue with appropriate pro- 
grams of fitness on their own. 

"And as the clinicians apply their 
intelligence and skill in the interests of 
the child, they also benefit. They in- 
crease their awareness of the range of 
human individuality and performance. 
Since no set of instructions or rules can 
be followed in dealing with the different 
children, the clinicians must adjust 
themselves to a particular child's devel- 
opmental level, abilities and disabilities. 
They must think their way through the 
problems and situations which arise. 
Moreover, they learn, perhaps as never 
before, of the close unity and interde- 
pendence of body, mind and social ad- 
justment. And they see what a friendly, 
trained, guiding hand can help a child 
accomplish. 

"In staff conferences the clinicians 
have an opportunity to draw upon the 
experience of faculty members of the 
College of Physical Education, Recrea- 
tion and Health and other consultants, 
and to discuss and share their experi- 
ences with one another. (It should be 
emphasized that the students who serve 
as clinicians do so on a volunteer basis 
without pay because of their profession- 
al interest. This fact suggests a selective 
factor which has an important bearing 
upon the quality of the student clinic- 
(Continued on next page) 

17 




mris involved in the program.) 

"In the Clinic we also attach the 
greatest importance to the parents of 
the children referred to us. 

"The parents are asked to provide 
the child with an excellent diet and to 
ensure proper rest so that greatest pro- 
gress oi their child can be expected. 
But of equal importance, they are urged 
to foster a fitness attitude in the home. 
Of course. the\ are asked to avoid 
'pushing" their children too much to 



practice and achieve: but b\ their inter- 
est and their own example they are 
asked to make those things that are 
basic to fitness a natural way of life for 
their children. We are often pleased 
at the way parents enter into the spirit 
of these suggestions and play a very 
worthwhile part in encouraging their 
children to carry out the daily activities 
suggested by the clinicians, and in 
praising the efforts and successes of 
their children." 




A s ' s THI SITUATION IN UI CLINICAL] 

work, the improvement noted from case 
to case is uneven. Of course, it is more 
exciting to focus upon the dramatic 
successes than upon the cases where 
little progress is noted. But it does ap- 
pear that the general circumstances of, 
the Clinic tend to favor improvement in 
the performance of the children. In the 
first place, environmental factors are 
important. The Cole Activities Building 
w here the clinic is held is colorful anc 
full of exciting equipment. But perhaps 
most important is the child's opportun- 
ity to associate on an intimate basis with 
the student clinicians. These student* 




18 






are intelligent, well-trained, and dressed 
in a way that is appropriate to their 
work: and they give their child their 
exclusive, friendly and concentrated at- 
tention. It is undoubtedly because of 
the nature of this association as well as 
the activities involved in the program 
that the children frequently are happy 
to completely modify their eating and 
•sleeping habits and take a serious inter- 
est in physical activities and in their 
own fitness. 

Evaluation procedures reveal that the 
Clinic experience helps to get many 
children off to a good start in terms of 
improved fitness, greater self-assurance, 
greater willingness to try new things, 
'and improved ability to participate in 
■the activities of other children. Some 



children have gone on to learn swim- 
ming and other skills which had pre- 
viously been considered beyond them. 
After seeing the response of their chil- 
dren to the remedial fitness program, 
with the help of their student clinicians 
some of the children's families have 
made far greater provision for sports 
and other recreational activities in their 
homes. Moreover, some professional 
therapists have reported back that after 
undergoing the Clinic experience, chil- 
dren under their care have shown sud- 
den improvement in their response to 
treatment — the theory being that with 
a more solid base of physical fitness to 
operate from, vision, speech and psy- 
chological problems are more amenable 
to treatment. 



Although the student clinicians are 
realistic enough to know that remedial 
fitness is not a cure-all for children's 
problems, they are enthusiastic about 
this experience which gives them an op- 
portunity to study, under laboratory 
conditions, the effects of a skillful and 
friendly teacher and a fitness program 
upon the minds and bodies of children. 

This, then, is the simple story of how, 
without dramatic fanfare, the State, 
through its University, is working hope- 
fully in this segment of human welfare. 
Perhaps, in comparison with other pro- 
grams, the Children's Remedial Fitness 
Clinic is organizationally small. But 
who can measure in mere words the 
faith and compassion of Dr. Johnson 
and his handful of student clinicians? 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 




News from the Clubs 



By Victor Holm, Field Secretary 

Publicity Chairmen should Address Reports 

of Meetings and Activities to Mr. Holm, 

Alumni Association, Administration Building, 

University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 



NOR I HI \M I KN SHOR1 U IMNI 
An ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING OI I Ml 

Northeastern Shore Alumni Club was 
held November 25 at the Brick Hotel. 
Denton. I he Club is being organized for 
alumni residing in the counties of Caro- 
line. Talbot, Kent and Queen Anne's. 

remporarj officers elected were: 
Robert W. Downs. Jr.. Law '46. Presi- 
dent; and Robert J. Fegan. Agriculture 
'54. Secretary I reasurer. 

The group is planning a general meet- 
ing lor alumni in this area sometime in 
early 1959. 



washington county ai.umni organize 

An organizational, miming, held 
in Hagerstown. November 12. started 
the ball rolling in the formation of an 
alumni club in Washington County. The 
establishment of an alumni club in 
Washington County is part of the Uni- 
versity's over-all plan to establish alum- 
ni clubs everywhere in the country 
where a sufficient number of alumni 
live. 

Mr. David L. Brigham. Director of 
Alumni Relations, told the gathering 
that University records show that ap- 
proximately 600 graduates came from 
Washington County and it is believed 
that a majority of them still live there. 

Attending the organization meeting 
were Scott Couchman. Charles Downey, 
Dr. Hillard Hayzlett. Dr. Ciordon 
Lewis, Bruce C. Lightner. Herbert Logs- 
don. Dr. Frank Lusby. Fred Menke. 
David K. Poole. Jr.. William Porter, 
Jr.. Raymond Patterson. Harr\ Vbll- 
mer. and Ralph Wachter. Also present 
was Vic Holm, Field Secretary for the 
Alumni Association. 

A dinner meeting was set for Janu- 
ary 31. 1959 at 6:30 in Hagerstown to 
which all alumni residing in Washing- 
Ion Count) will lie invited. Dr. Reuben 
Steinmeyer, Professor o\ Government 
and Politics will be the speaker. 

A temporal") Board Ol Directors and 
officers were elected until the January 
meeting when a permanent group of 
Directors and officers will be elected h\ 

20 



the entire membership. Temporary Di- 
rectors include Scott Couchman. 
Charles Downey. Dr. Hayzlett, Dr. 
Lusby, David K. Poole. Jr.. Harr\ 
Vollmer. and Ralph Wachter. 

Harr) Vollmer will serve as Presi- 
dent: Scott Couchman. Vice President: 
David Poole. Secretary- 1 reasurer. Mr. 
Vollmer will serve on the Fxecutive 
Council of the Alumni Association dur- 
ing the interim period until the Januar\ 
meeting. 

All alumni in Washington County 
are urged to contact any of the men 
who attended the organization meeting 
for information regarding the alumni 
club. 



AGRIC l I ll'RI- ALUMNI MEET 

There were 60 members present 
at the October 30 meeting of the United 
States Department of Agriculture 
Alumni Club. The fall meeting of the 
Club was held at the Department of 
Agriculture. Presiding over the gather- 
ing was Mylo Downey. Ag. '27. Presi- 
dent of the group. 

During the luncheon meeting. Vice- 
President Paul Smith. Ag. "26. intro- 
duced Bud Millikan. Basketball Coach 
for the University, as guest speaker for 
the occasion. Millikan outlined the 
basketball prospects for his team for 
the 1958-59 season. He also spoke on 
the general theme of "building men at 
the Universit\ o\ Maryland." 



m ( i iii nigh i 

The university oe Maryland "m" 

Club will hold its Annual Winter Sports 
Night on Saturday, February 21. pre- 
ceding the classic court struggle be- 
tween the University of Maryland At- 
lantic Coast Champions and the 
Universit) of North Carolina Tarheels. 

Plans call for viewing the pictures of 
last year's game in the "M" Club room 
at 5:00 p.m. At 6:00 p.m. a buffet 
supper will lie served in the Student 
Union building. Alumni will attend the 
court game at 8:00 p.m. in the Cole 
Memorial Activit) Building. 



I his year the "M" Club will honor 
as its guests the first basketball team 
representing the University of Maryland 
to win a conference championship. 1 h 
1929-30 team defeated Kentucky in the 
final game in March 1930 at Atlanta, 
Ga., to win Southern Conference cham- 
pionship honors. The Southern Con- 
ference in that period consisted of the 
teams now composing the present At 
lantic Coast Conference: Southeaste 
Conference and Southern Conference. 



I AW AI.UMNI TO MEET APRIL 1 1 

The alumni association or the 
School of Law will hold its Annual Ban- 
quet and Business Meeting on Saturday, 
April Nth. at the Belvedere Hotel 
Baltimore. The Nominating Committee, 
comprised of J. Calvin Carney '18, 
Lester E. Mallonee '34. William S. 
Mosner '32. Ernest N. Thompson '43, 
and Honorable Leon H. A. Pierson 'Ism 
Chairman, will submit the following 
list of nominees for election of Officers 
and Executive Committee for the in- 
coming year: 

President. Mary Arabian. '44; First 
Vice-President. Layman J. Redden. '34;- 
Second Vice-President. Honorable Em- 
ory H. Niles. '17: Third Vice-President. 
Honorable W. Albert Menchine. '29; 
and Secretary-Treasurer. G. Kenneth 
Reiblich. '29. 

Executive Committee: Rignal Bald- 
win. Esq.. '27: Thomas N. Berry. Esq., 
'40: Clayton C. Carter. Esq.. '46; Rich- 
ard W. Case. Esq.. '42: Hamilton P. 
Fox. Jr.. Esq.. '47: David Harkness. 
Esq.. '38; Kenneth C. Proctor. Esq.. '32: 
J. Hodge Smith. Esq.. '39; Marvin H. 
Smith. Esq.. '41: and Leonard Wein- 
berg. Esq.. '19. 

INNUA1 M CLUB \v% ARDS 

The m club presented thi ir an 

nual roster of awards at a banque 
December 13 at the Emerson Hotel 
Baltimore. 

1 he awards were presented as follow 
in their order o\ presentation: 

I he Charles P. McCormick Awart 
i Continued on page 23) 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZIN 



e 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR Sports Editor 




Tommy Mont Resigns as Head Football Coach 



[""LEAD FOOTBALL COACH TOMMY MONT 

|iesigned his position effective January 
31, 1959. 

On December 9, Mr. Robert J. Mc- 
Cartney. Director of University Rela- 
tions, issued this statement: 

"Tommy Mont's resignation as coach 
jof football effective at the end of his 
present contract on January 31, 1959. 
(was submitted late this afternoon to 
iPresident Elkins and was accepted. 

"The resignation was worked out in 
consultation with the Board of Regents 
and the President of the University and 
seemed in the best interests of all con- 
cerned. 

"The University will be seeking a 
flew head coach and recommendations 
may be received from the Athletic Di- 
rector, from the Athletic Council, and 
from the Athletic Committee of the 
Board of Regents. 

"The signing of a new coach will 
proceed as rapidly as possible and the 
final decision will be made by the 
Board of Regents." 

Tommy Mont was one of the all- 
time athletic names at the University. 
He had the distinction of being a three- 
sport athlete four years at Maryland, 
lettering in football, basketball, and la- 
icrosse. A graduate of Cumberland's 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



Allegany High School, he started his 
collegiate athletic career in 1941. He 
was in school two years before entering 
the service in the spring of 1943. He 
played tailback in 1941, then quarter- 
back on the 1942 T eleven. It was 
then that he laid the groundwork to 
become a great football player, even in 
those lean war seasons. Also, both 
years he won his basketball and lacrosse 
monograms. He won Ail-American 
mention as well as first team All-Con- 
ference and the Washington-Maryland 
outstanding college player awards in 
1942. 

During the war, Mont served 42 
months in the Army, 18 of which were 
spent in the ETO. He played ball 
throughout his long hitch in the service. 
He was tailback on the Fort Benning 
Post championship team of 1943. As 
quarterback and head coach, he led 
the 3rd Infantry team to the ETO title. 
He also was at the helm of the 7th 
Army all-Star team. 

Following his discharge. Mont re- 
turned to Maryland and was quarter- 
back on the 1946 team as he gained 
all-American mention and all-Confer- 
ence honors. 

Drafted by the Washington Redskins. 
Mont played four years as quarterback. 



Then came the call from Jim Tatum 
back to his Alma Mater as backficld 
coach. 

During his stay at Maryland, he 
worked with the Maryland High 
Schools. For three summers he spent 
two weeks as an advisory coach at Na- 
tional Polytechnic Institute in Mexico 
City. He was responsible for arranging 
the "international game" between the 
Terps frosh and the Institute's team, 
won by the Terps, 26-13. He also put 
in the T-formation for Scrappy Moore's 
University of Chattanooga eleven in 
1949. In the summer of 1954, he also 
was asked to assist teaching the Split-T 
for the Parris Island service team. He 
also was a collegiate talent scout for the 
Los Angeles Rams, and sent his own 
product. Ronnie Waller, to the Rams, 
who was "55 Rookie of the Year" by 
many picks. 

When Tatum left for North Carolina, 
he recommended his backfield coach of 
five years. In the three-year span as 
head coach, his teams won eleven, lost 
18, and tied one. Probably his greatest 
victory, and one of Maryland's greatest, 
was the 21-7 victory over North Caro- 
lina in Byrd Stadium before Queen 
Elizabeth and Prince Philip. 

(sports Continued Next Page) 

21 



Maryland's Championship Team Faces Tough Fight 



JL/I II \M 01 IISI1KSI MUMK (<>\M 

( onference ( h.unpionship w ill be .1 
more difficull assignment than winning 
the title last spring. 

Acclaimed nationallj tor his continu- 
ous success and tor bringing Maryland 
into the top echelon ol basketball 
circles. Bud Millikan had to part, 
through graduation, with three-fifths ol 
the team that led the I erps to their 
first floor title since 1931; their first 
participation in the NCAA playoffs; 
and their highest national ranking in 
the school's history, sixth. 



I he letlermen involved are senior Gene 
Danko, McKeesport, Pa.; Bill Murphy, 
Pittsburgh, Pa.; Jim Halleck, Elizabeth. 
N J.; juniors Jerry Bechtle. Elizabeth. 
N. J.: and Jem Shanahan. Pittsburgh, 
Pa.; and sophomore Bob McDonald. 
Lansdowne, Pa. McDonald is a good 
big boj who worked with the varsity 
last year but didn't play. He is giving 
the Terps three tall trees in the starting 
lineup. 

Another reason for the great con- 
cern in the lerp camp has been the 
schedule. Besides the two games with 




Season's opener lost to North Carolina Stale. 55-53. 



I he losses were critical ones. too. 
The three. Nick Davis. Tom Young. 
and John Nacincik comprised the out- 
standing back court trio. All three were 
seasoned veterans as starters each of 
the three years the) played. Most nota- 
ble in the loss is the sharp shooting and 
scoring of Davis, the ball hawking, 
leadership, and pla\ making oi Young: 
and the scoring and excellent defensive 
work ol Nacincik. 1 his is what has 
departed from what was Millikan's best 
basketball team. 

Returning from the starting five ol 
the championship team are its pair of 
all-stars as sophomores last season. 6-6 
( barles McNeil. Pennsgrove, N. J., and 
\l Bunge, 6-9, Palmyra, V j. 

I he top players from which Millikan 
is getting these vital replacements in- 
volve several veterans and a newcomer. 

22 



conference opponents. labeled the 
toughest in America, the Millikanmen 
took on top teams of the nation in 
December. Following the 55-53 loss 
to NC State in the opener, the Terps 
went to Evanston. 111. to take on the 
Northwestern Wildcats, an earlj season 
choice to win the Big Ten Title, and 
lost 66-62. 

They returned home to meet a 
Virginia team that lost nobody from 
their great team of last year, and won 
63-56. Their next assignment was at 
1 exington, K\.. when they met the de- 
fending national champions. Kentucky, 
and lost in overtime 58-56. They re- 
turned home and lost 53-50 to Nav) 
and closed their December slate with a 
big game against the highly regarded 
Wake Forest Demon Deacons. 

\side from these problems, the eight 



returning lettermen offer some solace 
in that they are fine basketball players 
Shanahan. a non-letterman returning, 
gives Millikan nine returnees. He has 
three fine prospects up from the fresh- 
man team in Paul Jelus. Camden. N. J., 
Bruce Kelleher. Wilmington. Del.; and 
Ted Marshall. Johnstown. Pa. The big 
man of the team 6-10 Bob Wilson, who 
didn't play last season will be another 
soph to bear watching. He has come 
along real well. 

There is still a great deal of excite 
ment around College Park over the ex- 
pectation that the Terps will have an 
other winning record. Regardless of th 
severe losses of personnel and the 
severity of the schedule, it is known 
throughout the basketball coaching 
world that Millikan is one of the best. 

Pete Krukar. junior from Ford City. 
Pa., and senior Doc Weingarten, Wash- 
ington. D. C, complete the list of re- 
turning lettermen. 

McNeil and Bunge represent two of 
the finest plavers Maryland has had and 
definitely were the best soph duo e\er 
to play for the Terps. Both were picked 
on pre-season all-star and all-American 
teams. Repeat performances of last 
year are certain to bring them national 
honors at the close of the season. Mc- 
Neil set a new record for a soph at 
Maryland as he scored 401 points to 
lead the Terp scorers last season with 
a 13.8 average. He also is a fine re- 
bounder, picking off 202. He was 
sensational the latter part of the season 
and in the ACC tournament and 
NCAA playoff games. He was called 
the nation's second best sophomore, 
second to Cincinnati's Oscar Robertson. 
Bunge too was an all-league pick and 
hit for 297 points for a 10.2 mark. He 
is a demon on the boards, grabbing 
265 last year to lead the team. 

In Danko. Bechtle. Murphy and 
Halleck. Millikan has some of the best 
all-around talented basketball players 
with which to work. All are exceptional 
floor men with outstanding potential. 

We cannot overlook the defensive 
strength that characterizes a Maryland 
team. Millikan's teams always have 
been one of the nation's top teams on 
defense and he has led the conference 
in this department all eight years he 
has been coaching here. There is no 
question he has one of the top defensive 
basketball minds in the game. His 
players are extremel\ well coached in 
defensive skills. This season is no ex- 
ception. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



News from the Clubs 
Continued from page 2d 



presented by Mr. McCormick. Chair- 
man of the Board of Regents, and 
awarded to Ernest J. Bet/, lacrosse 
stand-out. Eligibility tor this award is 
limited to University seniors whose re- 
sidence is established in the Baltimore 
area. The award is made to the indivi- 
dual adjudged to have contributed the 
mosl to athletics during his senior year. 

The Talbot T. Speer Award, pre- 
sented In Mr. Speer. President of the 
Baltimore Business Forms Co.. awarded 
to George T. Taft, track. To win the 
Speer Award, an athlete must excel in 
the qualities of leadership, scholarship 
and have all-around ability. 

The A. V. Williams Award, presented 
by Mr. Williams. President of the Wil- 
liams Construction Co.. awarded to A. 
Robert Rusevlyan. Maryland football 
great. 

The A. V. Williams Appreciation 
Award, was awarded to Frederick M. 
Cole, football. The qualifications most 
desired for the recipient of this award 
|is outstanding and conspicuous sports- 
manship. 

Honorary M Club memberships were 
•presented by Bill Veeck to John D. 
Schapiro. Robert L. Turley, Alvin L. 
; Aubinoe and Hugh Wiley. 

Admitted to the State of Maryland 
Hall of Fame were Edwin A. Rommel. 
Joe Dundee. Burton K. Shipley, Edwin 
IjH. W. Harlan (in memoriam, accepted 
jlby Edwin H. W. Harlan. Jr.). Hall of 
Fame presentations were made by Dr. 
IH. C. Byrd. 

All-America Awards, presented by 
Bill Veeck, were presented to Richard 
L. Corrigan. Deane R. Beman and 
Ernest J. Betz. 

The John William Guckeyson Me- 
morial Award, presented by C. Robert 
Boucher, initiator of the Award, was 
iwarded to Perry Moore. Qualifications 
for this Award are that the recipient 
must be an outstanding athlete, scholar 
ind leader, and must be a two-letter 
man in two major sports. 

The Atlantic Coast Conference 
Championship Coaches Award, pre- 
sented by Hotsy Alperstein, was 
tuarded to H. A. '•Bud" Millikan, 
basketball coach and Assistant Director 
jf Athletics. 

The Outstanding Athlete Award, pre- 
sented by Mr. Millikan, went to Robert 
L. Turley. 

The Distinguished Service Award, 
presented by Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, 



President of the University) was 
awarded to John D. Schapiro, President 
oi the Laurel Race ( om si- 
Concluding the awards program was 
a presentation by Joseph Deckman, Past 

President ol the Alumni Association, to 

lomim Mont, recently resigned head 
tooth. ill coach. 
The banquet committee, winch per- 

formes in an excellent and efficient 

manner was comprised of: Charles .1. 
Herbert. General Chairman: Milton H. 
Vandenberg. P r o g r a m Chairman, 
Donald Ci. Hillary. Ticket Chairman: 
George Corrigan, Publicity Chairman. 
Samuel L, Silber, Arrangements Chair- 
man: and Charles Ellinger, George 
Knepley. Harvey C. Simms. Albert Far- 
rell. Jay Phillips and Hotsy Alperstein. 

M Club officers are Hotsy Alperstein. 
President; Kenneth Maskcll, First Vice 
President; Ched Beebe, Second Vice 
President; James H. Kehoe, Secretary; 
and Joseph H. Deckman, Treasurer. 

The M Club Board of Governors are: 
Charles Ellinger, Football; Harvey C. 
Simms, Basketball; David Zatz, Base- 
ball; Donald G. Hillary, Lacrosse; 
George McGowan. Track: Benny 
Alperstein, Boxing; Arthur Cook, Rifle; 
Ralph G. Shure, Cross Country; Jap 
Phillips, Tennis: Kenneth W. Fowler, 
Soccer; Elmer Bright, Wrestling; and 
Rubin Alspaw. Golf. 



Campus Notes 

Continued from page 4 



Ages to the 19th Century) in modern 
editions. 

Among the series are Denkmaeler 
Deutscher Tonkunst. containing 65 vol- 
umes; Denkmaeler der Tonkunst in 
Bayern. a 30 volume set; and Denk- 
maeler der Tonkunst in Oesterreich is 
in 87 volumes. Each set contains the 
works of composers who were active 
in Germany, Bavaria and Austria. 

Commenting on the acquisition of 
the sets, Professor Homer Ulrich. Head 
of the University's Department of 
Music said that these sets will provide 
a basis for work in music history on the 
senior and graduate levels. 

"We have tried to acquire these sets 
for a number of years, however, they 
are presently out of print and it is very 
rare that complete sets appear on the 
market. I consider our library to be 
very fortunate to have secured these 
sets before they disappear completely," 
he said. 



Purchase ol the volumes was made 

possible In fundi placed at the hhr.iis's 

disposal in I Ik- Greatei University ol 
Maryland I und, the l niversity's annual 

alumm giving program. 

rhese sets are fully indexed and ex- 
plained m dimes Dictionary ol Music 
and Musicians and the Harvard l> 
tionary ol Music. 

xi \sl k si i di CONTINUED 

Research on a new type ol solid-State 

Maser will be continued at the Depart- 
ment of Electrical Engineering under a 
$16,000 grant from the Office of Naval 
Research. 

Maser, an abbreviation for micro- 
wave amplification b\ stimulated emis- 
sion of radiation, is used in radar. Its 
principle is a radical departure from 
previous amplifiers which utilized 
vacuum tubes. 

[Continued on next page) 




After the Tornado- Red 
Cross helps rebuild a shattered town. 

On the job... 

when you need it most 

The twister passed in a single devas- 
tating moment. Months later, Red 
Cross help was still there. 

It was a big job. Houses, stores, 
barns— half the town lay in ruins. Red 
Cross helped build it up again— abso- 
lutely free. About 850" of each Red 
Cross disaster dollar goes for this pur- 
pose and it is all an outright gift. 
Nothing is sold or loaned. 

Last year 41,000 Americans re- 
ceived such disaster assistance. Give 
generously this year. You can count 
on Red Cross to be on the job— when 
you need it most. 



America's great 
volunteer 
task force 




JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1959 



23 



( ampus Notes 

( ont'mued from page 23 



Directoi ol the projecl is Di Joseph 
Weber uho received the "Engineering 
Sciences Award" in 1958 from the 
Washington Academj ol Sciences tor 
originating the principles on which 
maser is based, independent!) of similar 
work .it Columbia University and in 
Russia. 

According to Dr. Weber newer 
Masers make use. in practical elec- 
tronics, of the "spinning top" properties 
ot the electron. I he radio vacuum 
tubes utilize the charge properties of the 
electron. I he much lower noise pro- 
perties of masers greatly extend the 
range of radar and permit stud) ol 
more distant galaxies bv radio astron- 
omy. 

In addition to theoretical work on the 
noise characteristics of masers. research 
is also in progress at the University on 
the structure of certain crystals in order 
to develop improved devices. 



IV-MI) SIKHS HI (.INS EIGHTH YEAR 

I he Posturaduate Committee of the 



l niversit) ot Mars land School ol 

Medicine began its eighth year ol the 
Ix-MD series ot television presenta- 
tions lor the la) public on Sunda\ after- 
noon, November 16. 

I he first Sundav's program of the 
series, broadcast trom 5:30 to 6 o'clock 
p.m. over Station WBAL-TV channel 
II. concerned a discussion ot Hear- 
ing" b) Dr. Benjamin S. Rich. Associate 
Professor ot Otolarv ngologv in the De- 
partment of Surgerj . 

Dr. Rich explained various condi- 
tions that affect hearing and ways to 
protect the hearing of children. 



(iKanis SPONSOR rwo iNsniiiis 

Grants totaling S 1 24.400 have been re- 
ceived by the Lniversitv from the Na- 
tional Science Foundation for the opera- 
tion of two summer institutes. 

An Institute for Junior High School 
teachers of Mathematics, under the di- 
rection of Dr. John Brace, of the De- 
partment of Mathematics, has been 
scheduled. In addition, an institute has 
been scheduled for high school science 
teachers. The science teachers program 
will be under the direction of Dr. 
Joshua R. C. Brown, oi the Department 
of Zoology. 

Both institutes will be held during the 
University's regular summer session 
which begins on June 22. 



I N rOMOl OCT VI I MM S RECEIVES 
APPOINTMENT 

( ommissioner of Food and Drugs 
George J\ I.arrick has announced the 
appointment of John Guill. Jr., as Chief 
of the Chicago District of the Fc 
and Drug Administration. Mr Guil 
replaces George T. Daughters, who vvi 
be in charge of the FDA's Detroit 
District. 

Mr. Guill attended Washington. D. C. 
high schools and received his B. S. 
degree in Entomology from the Lniver- 
sitv of Marvland in I93X. At Marvlant 
Mr. Guill was elected to Alpha Zet 
agriculture fraternity. 

In his new position. Mr. Guill will 
direct enforcement of the Federal Food, 
Drug, and Cosmetic Act in heavily pop- 
ulated areas of the northern third of 
Illinois, including Greater Chicago, and 
the eastern third of Wisconsin, including 
Milwaukee, Green Bay. and Shebovgan. 

Mr. Guill has been Chief Inspector 
of the St. Louis District since Ma) 
1957. Previously, he was Chief Inspec- 
tor of the Baltimore and Minneapolis 
Districts. He began his FDA career 
October 2. 1939. as a Food and Drug 
Inspector at the Baltimore District and 
later served at Charleston. West Vir- 
ginia, and at the Eastern District head- 
quarters in New York City. 

As an inspector. Mr. Guill designed 
the field kit for determination of critical 














.**' 



% /> 



24 



dissolution temperatures which FDA 
men use to detect substitutions of mai 
garine for butter. 

In announcing the appointment. 
Commissioner 1 arrick said: "Both as 
an inspector and Chief Inspector. John 
Ciuill has made QOteworthj contribu- 
tions. He has demonstrated that success 
in food and drug law enforcement de- 
pends, not onlj on scientific training. 
but also on ability to devise new tools 
and methods." 

I HIRD ARMED FORCES 
EDUCATION CONFERENCE SCHEDULED 

I he University of Maryland will spon- 
sor its Third World Wide Armed Forces 
Education Conference in Baltimore, 
Md.. February 19-20. 1959. 

Purpose of the gathering is to discuss 
needs and problems of Armed Services 
education programs conducted in co- 
operation with various American col- 
leges and universities. Leading military 
and civilian educators. from all 
branches of the military services and 
American universities, will attend the 
two-day parley. 

Highlighting the conference will be 
addresses by General L. L. Lemnitzer, 
Vice Chief of Staff. U.S. Army, and 
Dr. Arthur S. Adams, President of the 
American Council on Education. 

Similar conferences were held in 
June. 1953. and January, 1954, in Bal- 
timore. More than 200 Armed Forces 
education advisors. Military personnel 
and civilian educators attended each 
conference. 

CAMPUS "BOOTSTRAPPERS" 
MAKE OUTSTANDING ACADEMIC RECORD 

University of Maryland campus "Boot- 
istrap" students during the second semes- 
ter of the 1957-58 school year made an 
outstanding record in academic achieve- 
ment compared with the University as a 
whole. 

Of the 94 Bootstrap students on cam- 
pus during the second semester of 1957- 
58, 25 percent made the honor list with 
scholastic averages of 3.5 or above. 

The second semester honor list 
totaled 404 undergraduate campus stu- 
dents. This number represented 5 per- 
cent of the 7.789 full-time undergrad- 
uate students on campus during the 
second semester. 

Viewed another way, while campus 
Bootstrappers made up only one per- 
cent of the student body during the 
second semester, they constituted 6 per- 
cent of the total number of students 
making the honor's list. 

Bootstrap students are active-duty 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



niilii.iiA personnel on temporals as- 
signment on the college campus to com- 
plete then college degrees. 1 he\ are 
older and as a rule more highly moti- 
vated than the regular undergraduate 
day student on campus. Most of them 
are married and have families. 

Most Bootstrap students took Uni- 
versity courses in the off-campus state- 
side or overseas programs before com- 
ing on the campus to complete their 
degrees. 

REPORT DISCUSSES CONVERSION 
OF SALT WATER TO FRESH IN BAY 

In a study soon to be published by the 
University of Maryland Bureau of Busi- 
ness and Economic Research, the con- 
version of salt and brackish water into 
fresh water is regarded as imminently 
practical and prospectively applicable to 
the region of the Chesapeake Bay as 
well as to arid areas of the world. 
Scientific and technological problems 
and accomplishments are surveyed and 
economic costs are considered. 

The report opens with the statement: 
"Desaltation of sea and brackish water 
is no longer a laboratory phenomenon 
but is of growing practical importance 
in the United States and abroad. Large- 
scale plants are now in operation and 
many more are being constructed. An 
impressive number of different types of 
processes can be used for obtaining 
fresh water from the sea, ranging from 
freezing to superheating." 

BPA AWARDED TWO SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Price Waterhouse Foundation has 
provided the College of Business and 
Public Administration with two scholar- 
ships, Dean J. Freeman Pyle has an- 
nounced. 

The scholarships will be awarded to 
seniors of the College whose studies are 
concentrated in accounting. 

Recipients of the awards will be 
chosen by faculty members of the de- 
partment of accounting on the basis of 
interest in and aptitude for public ac- 
counting and a teaching career. 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE GRANT 

The Division of Arthritis in the Depart- 
ment of Medicine of the School of 
Medicine has received a $14,000 train- 
ing grant from the National Institutes of 
Health and a $5,000 grant for research 
from the Maryland Chapter of the 
Arthritis and Rheumatism Foundation. 
Dr. Henry J. L. Marriott. Head of 
the Division of Arthritis, announced 
today that the grants will make possible 
expansion of the present training and 
research programs in arthritis. A new 



lull time trainee, i>i Keith Mohmh. has 
arrived from I ngland u> join the group 

Dr. Ad. illicit Schubart, who h.is been 
on leave Ol absence since October I, 

1957, to woik as ,i trainee al M.iss.i 
chusetts General Hospital, will return 
to l)i Marriott's group on April I. 



College of 

AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 



REV. BADEN ENTERS MISSION 

The Rev. John Baden. '39, rector of 
St. James Episcopal Church, Monkton, 
Md., has become an Associate in the 
Department of Missions for the Diocese 
of Virginia, at Cardwell, Virginia. 

In his new assignment, Mr. Baden 
will work with town and country 
churches and will serve as diocesan 
missioner, keeping churches together in 
rural districts that are temporarily with- 
out a rector. He has always been 
keenly interested in rural church work 
and for six years has been director of 
the Middle Atlantic rural work of his 
church. 

DANIEL TO GEORGIA 

Dr. O'Dell G. Daniel, '49, has joined 
the staff of the Agricultural Extension 
Service, University of Georgia. Dr. 
Daniel is with the Department of Ani- 
mal Husbandry and will work with 
county agents in helping cattlemen im- 
prove their production and marketing 
of top quality livestock. 

After receiving his B.S. degree at 
the University of Maryland, Dr. Daniel 
attended Oklahoma A.&M. University 
where he received both his M.S. and 
Ph.D. degrees in Animal Husbandry. 
Before moving to Georgia, he served 
for six years as Associate Professor and 
a year as Dean of Animal Husbandry 
at Panhandle A.&M. College in Okla- 
homa. 

DAIRY TEAM SO CLOSE 

The Maryland 4-H Dairy judging team 
placed two points away from a first 
place tie with the Nebraska team in the 
national contest at Waterloo, Iowa. In 
competition with teams from thirty-two 
states the Maryland young people 
scored 1,922 points and the national 
winners scored 1.994. Congratulations 
go to the team: John Morris, the coach; 
and W. Sherard Wilson. State 4-H Club 
Agent. 

(Continued on next page) 

25 



\l IMAGES MALI issll I I I I 

Calvin Skinner, '38, who served tor 
many \ ».• . 1 1 -< .is Secretary ol the In- 
State Packers Association is General 
Managei ol the Barley and Mali Insti- 
tute with headquarters in Chicago. 

mi \ i inspi ( roa 
Dr \ K Gabuten, '51, has transferred 
his veterinary activities from the Mary- 
land I ivestock Sanitary Service to the 

I S I). A. to he .1 meal inspector in the 

Agricultural Research Service. 

\i vm i \m> ( ovv" vi moms 
CONFERENC1 

I he COW jumped over the moon." 
Another cow kicked over the lantern 
that set Chicago on fire, but the "Mary- 
land Cow" is famous for having at- 
tended the International Atoms for 
Peace Conference held in Geneva, 
Switzerland. 

Actually she was an animated exhibit 
showing how the dairv cow converts 
teed into milk. I he exhibit was devel- 
oped hv Dr. Joseph C. Shaw and fellow 
researchers in the University of Mary- 
land Dairv Department. 

Dr. Shaw was invited to present a 
paper at this conference and to prepare 
the cow exhibit. Dr. Shaw and his team 
have performed a great deal of work 
during the past few years with radio- 
isotopes in determining how feed is 
broken down in the rumen, how the 
end products in the rumen pass into 
the blood, how the blood substances 
are altered by the liver and. finallv. 
how these altered substances are con- 
verted into milk. 

This was made possible by keeping 
the stomach, or rumen, of the cow. and 
the liver and the udder alive, for an 
hour or more, after removing these 
organs from the slaughtered animal. 
Each organ has been kept alive by an 
artificial heart and lung. By making 
simple feed substances radioactive it is 
possible to trace the substance through 
the various organs and into the milk. 
I his is something that can not even 
be attempted without the use of radio- 
isotopes. We have done sufficient work, 
to indicate to us quite clearly that we 
shall soon be able to discard much of 
the older, expensive and long-time 
studies involving massive feeding trials. 
digestibility experiments and so forth." 
Dr. Shaw said. 

II NklNs III VDS I 1 OKISTS 

David F. Jenkins. "47. was elected 
President of the Allied Florists of 
Greater Washington, and is associated 
with ( 1. Jenkins and Sons. Inc.. 



flower growers oi Suitland. Maryland. 
Mr Jenkins is a Director ol the Mid- 
dle Atlantic Florist Association. Past 
President ol the Growers Division of 
Allied Florists, a Director ol the Prince 
Georges ( OUnty Farm Bureau. He is a 
member of Alpha Gamma kho Fra- 
ternitv. Secretary ol South date I. ions 
Club and was most active in 4-H Club 
and okler youth activities 

H VSSI II I ID K VNSVS 

Richard Bassette has been appointed as 
Assistant Professor in the Dairy Depart- 
ment at Kansas State College. He will 
teach and do research in dairv manu- 
facturing. 

Bassette received his Ph.D. in dairy- 
ing at the Universitv ol Maryland last 
June. He previously received his B.S. 
in 1952 and the M.S. degree from 
Maryland in 1955. The Bassettes have 
two daughters and an infant son. 

XI Vi I R RETURNS EAST 

Elmer I.. Mayer, '36. has transferred 

from Fresno. California to the Belts- 
ville Research Center of the U.S.D.A. 
He is specializing in stored products 
insects. 

BENNETT LIVESTOCK BUYER 

Tom Bennett. '5 1 . is head of the hog 
division for Myers and Houseman at 
the Baltimore Union Stock Yards. Bal- 
timore. Following graduation he was 
with Armour and Company for five 
years as assistant head livestock buver. 
Tom has two daughters and lives at 
Randallstown. 

DR. SHEPARD EDITS BOOK 

Dr. Harold H. Shepard. M.S. '57. has 
edited a book entitled Methods of Test- 
ing Chemicals on Insects. Dr. Shepard 
is Chief. Agricultural Chemicals Staff. 
U.S. Department of Agriculture and is 
a lecturer in entomology at Maryland. 

POTTS PUBLISHES BOOK 

Dr. S. F. Potts. M.S. '24. has published 
a book entitled. Concentrated Spray 
Equipment, Mixture and Application 
Methods. 

LANGFORD ON PI V\ I HOARD 

Dr. George Langford, M.S. 1924. State 
Entomologist, was elected as a member 
oi the National Plant Board and at- 
tended their annual meeting in Port- 
land. Oregon. The National Plant Board 
is dedicated to protecting American 
agriculture from injurious insects and 
plant diseases 



INSECT SPECIALIST ON STAFF 

Dr. Allen L. Steinhauer has joined the 
Entomology Department where he will 
specialize in the control of insects that 
affect forage crops. Dr. Steinhauer has 
also served at the Universitv of Mani- 
toba and Oregon State College. 

PATTERSON IN DETROIT 

Dewey Patterson. Jr.. '52. in Agricul- 
tural Economics, is on the sales staff 
ol Continental Diamond and Fiber 
Company in Detroit. 

HONORED HV L.S.I). A. 

Dr. Daniel Swern. Ph.D.. '40. was 
honored by the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture for his part in the develop- 
ment of vmvl stearate. a component of 
plastics made from animal fats. Vinyl 
stearate can be used in plastics for 
articles that must remain permanently 
rigid — such as phonograph records, 
tovs. wire coating, garden hose, rain- 
coats, and water-based paints. 

AGRR LI I I K VI All VCHE 

Dr. Cabell Schull. formerly with the 
Department of Agricultural Economics, 
has been named Assistant Agricultural 
Attache by the Department of State 
and assigned to London. Dr. Schull 
taught courses in foreign trade of agri- 
cultural products and developed a cur- 
riculum in advance study of Interna 
tional Agricultural Economics. He spent 
two years in Iraq as a marketing spe- 
cialist and for the past year has been 
in London. 

BOPST HONORED 

Leslie E. Bopst. State Chemist and well 
known Head of the State Inspection 
Service was honored by the Association 
of American Feed Control Officers at 
their golden anniversary in Washington. 
D. C. 

Mr. Bopst has been Secretary of the 
Feed Association for 31 years. Known 
in the trade as "Mr. Feed Control." 
Bopst was made a lifetime member of j 
the Association and elected Secretary 
Emeritus. 

sXHTH APPOINTED INSPECTOR 

Herbert L. Smith. '58. was recently 
appointed as a Plant Pest Control In- 
spector with the Plant Pest Control 
Division of the Agricultural Research 
Service. United States Department of 
Agriculture. He will have his head- 
quarters in Hicksville. New York. 



26 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Staff o) the College 



\\\ \uni i> OR u>i \ 1 1 m OR] i 
Ralph I Rosnow, '57, received the 
Master ol Arts degree in Psychology 
from the George Washington University 
exercises this past June. His thesis was 
entitled 'The Measurement of Thresh- 
olds of Retinal- Adaptation and a 
1 heorj Pursuant to the Physical Phe- 
nomenon." 




Mr. Peters 

WITH BERKSHIRE LIFE 

Marshall E. Peters, '54, has been ap- 
pointed a representative of the Berk- 
shire Life Insurance Company in the 
Baltimore area. Mr. Peters specialized 
in biological sciences and was graduated 
with a B.S. degree. After graduation 
Ihe served for two years with the Army 
Medical Corps in Germany and re- 
turned to the University in 1956 as an 
instructor in zoology laboratory while 
taking graduate courses. 

SWINNERTON RECOGNIZED FOR 
GOOD WORK 

A letter from Dean Coyle E. Moore. 
Dean of the School of Social Welfare 
at Florida State University, reveals that 
Mr. Gerald Swinnerton. '56. is doing 
very well as he continues in the second 
year of a two-year graduate program of 
education and training in social work. 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



ihe letter states m part: "We are 
verj glad i>> have Mi Swinnerton with 
us He is making a verj good record. 

"It is our hope thai in the years 

ahead we ma\ have other University 

ol Maryland alumni in our School with 
as much potential for growth and devel 
opment as Mr. Swinnerton." 

PAIN I IN(, Slot IN FROM SI UD1 N I 
UNION BUI1 DIN(i 

Crosses." an oil painting by Professor 
James P. Wharton. Head of the Depart- 
ment of Art, was stolen from the Stu- 
dent Union building on or about Octo- 
ber 27th. No clues have as yet been 
uncovered to lead to the recovery of 



the work, valued al sunn Pout yean 
ago .1 preliminary sketch ol i»k- lame 
painting u.is taken from the Arts and 
Sciences building, and uas nevci re- 
covered, 



M \K1I I \llllll I III OPI N IN 

m w VORK in MAR< II 

A huge one-man show ot paintings hy 
Professor Herman Maril will be held 
at the Babcock Galleries, New York, 
during the month of March. 

During the past summer, painting! 

by Mr. Maril were exhibited widely 

throughout the country. One of his 

large oils. "Sentinels." was selected by 

(Continued <>n next page) 



THE DIPLOMAT SALUTES 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



THE 



Diplomat 

HOTEL AND COUNTRY CLUB 
HOLLYWOOD- BY-TH E-SEA/ FLORIDA 



EAST/ WEST 



PREMIERE SEASON 



GEORGE E. FOX. Managing Director IRVING TILLIS, Director of Sales 
SOL W. GELTMAN, Executive Food and Beverage Director 



THIS IS THE YEAR OF THE DIPLOMAT 



27 



the jur) tvii the first Annual Provincc- 
town \iis Festival. Another of his 
nils. "Serenity," was shown .it the 
Boston \Ms Festival. He has also had 
his work on display at the Colorado 
Springs Fine Arts Festival, and at a 
new \merican gallery which opened 
in Paris. While in Provincetown Mr. 
M.uil served on the jur) ol selection 
foi the annual exhibition ol the 
Provincetown Art Association. 

\KI I \llllll I I OR PARI N IS' DAY 

\ one-man show ol paintings by Pro- 
fessor James I'. Wharton. Head of the 

\m Department, was held in honor of 
Parents' Day, October llth. Ihe ex- 
hibit was on display in the Auditorium 
ol the Student Union building. 

MH1S FROM THE DEPARTMI \l 
in MUSIC 
Foe! Herman and Charlton Meyer 
opened the Faculty Concert Series with 
an excellent sonata recital including 
works of Mozart. Brahms and Bartok. 
I hey also performed at the MSMTA 
convention in Salisbury and on Novem- 
ber 6 at Howard University in Wash- 
ington as part of our Concert Exchange 
program. 

The Music Department is once again 
presenting a series of chamber music 
recitals featuring performers from the 
United St.ites Marine Band. These in- 
teresting and varied programs are held 
on campus each month and are open 
to the public. 



I he choral groups on the campus 
will be ver) active during the coming 
months. Ihe Women's Chorus will 
travel to I mmitsburg to take part in a 
Christmas program. I he> will also pre- 
sent two Christmas concerts on campus. 
Ihe Mens (dee Club will present its 
traditional Yuletide program and in 
February will tour Virginia, singing at 
colleges there and before the Alumni 
Chapter in Richmond. Ihe Chapel 
Choir will sing the Thanksgiving service 
in the Chapel and will present the 
"Messiah" at Christmas. 

PR] si n is PAPER 

Dr. Charles E. White presented a paper 
at the meeting of the Society for Ap- 
plied Spectroscopy in New York on 
November 7. 

GUEST SPEAKERS 

Recent guest speakers at the Chemistry 
Department's Fall Lecture Series have 
been Dr. William E. Truce from Pur- 
due University. Dr. David N. Hume 
from the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and Dr. W. C. Fernelius 
from Pennsylvania State University. 

MR. HOHING PROMOTED 

Mr. Conrad Hohing. '43. was recently 
appointed Quality Control Superin- 
tendent for the Onyx Oil & Chemical 
Company. In his new position. Mr. 
Hohing will be responsible for product 
quality control, a function which is 



being emphasized and expanded at 
Onyx. He was formerly supervisor of 
development and utilization of \arn 
lubricants for the Celanese Corporation 
of America at the Cumberland. Mary- 
land plant. 

Mr. Hohing holds a degree in chem- 
istry from the University. He did 
graduate work in statistical quality con- 
trol at the University of Michigan and 
Rutgers University. He is an active 
member of the American Society for 
Quality Control. Mr. and Mrs. Hohing 
and their three children make their 
home in the Summit. New Jerse\ area. 

DEPARTMEN1 ol MICROBIOLOGY NOTES 

The Department of Microbiologv has 
been awarded a research grant from 
the National Institutes of Health in the 
amount of $8,970.00 for the period 
from June I. 1958. through May 31 
1959. Title of the research projec 
is interconversions Among PPLO, 
L-Forms and Bacteria." The principal 
investigator. Thomas H. Morrison, 
M.S.. will be assisted by Robert C. 
0*Connell. B.S.: both are graduate stu- 
dents in the Department of Microbiol- 
ogy. The co-investigators are Dr. John 
E. Faber, Head. Department of Micro- 
biology; Dr. R. G. Wittier and Dr. S. J. 
Ajl. both of the Department of Bac- 
teriology. Walter Reed Army Institute 
of Research. The objective of the re- 
search is to acquire basic information 
on the biochemical mechanisms and the 
nature of the factors involved in the 



: 

1 



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• RESERVED SEATS • HOSTESS ABOARD 

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Daily from Washington and Baltimore to 
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Charter Buses for 
trips anywhere, 
anytime 




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nearest Trailways 
Terminal 



28 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



relationship among the pleuropneu 
mom. i like organisms (PPLO), the 
I forms, and theii corresponding clas- 
sical bacterial forms l he experiments 
used m carrying out this research will 
aid m elucidating t ho biochemical basis 
of the known morphological changes 
which occur m various species ot bac 
ton. i (.luring their presence in the hu- 
man host. I lie significance ol the mor- 
phological changes may become more 
meaningful it they can he correlated 
with specific biochemical events. The 
findings, in turn, may provide a better 
understanding of the host-parasite rela- 
tionship and a more rational approach 
to combating bacterial infections. The 
Walter Reed Army Institute of Re- 
search will provide most of the space 
and many of the facilities for the carry- 
ing out of this study. 

Dr. Norman C. LatVer. Associate 
Professor. Department of Microbiology, 
attended a meeting of the Intersociety 
Committee for laboratory problems 
related to health, held at St. Louis. 
Missouri, on October 25. 1958. Dr. 
Laffer was observer for the American 
Academy of Microbiology. 

On November 9. 10. 11. and 12. Dr. 
Taffer. accompanied by Dean Charles 
Manning of the College of Arts and 
(Sciences, attended a conference of pre- 
jmedical education held at the Buckhills 
Lodge. Buckhill Falls. Pennsylvania. 

DR. STANTON BECOMES DIRECTOR 

Dr. William A. Stanton. '36, was re- 
cently appointed Director of the 
DuPont Company's Parlin, New Jersey, 
((Research Laboratory. He received a 
B.S. degree in Chemistry and a Ph.D. 
degree in Organic Chemistry from the 
University. 

Dr. Stanton has been with the 
uPont Company in research and 
upervisory work since 1941. After 



D, 

T 



'eight years with the research laboratory 
and technical division at Parlin, he was 
appointed Production Superintendent of 
(the Parlin plant. He was named Assist- 
ant Manager at Rochester two years 



TURNER REPRESENTS TOP TILE FIRM 

William A. Turner, '58, has been ap- 
pointed Cincinnati sales representative 
jfor the Mosaic Tile Company, leading 
manufacturer of ceramic tile. He 
recently completed a thorough training 
urogram at the company's home office 
n Zanesville, Ohio. 

Bill, a native of Washington, D. C, 
s a Marine Corps veteran, and holds a 
Bachelor of Science degree in Market- 
ng Administration. 



in ki>i l l l \DDKI ssi s CONVENTION 

Di Franklin I Burdette, Professoi and 
Directoi ol the Bureau ol Govern 
mental Research, spoke at the conven 
tion ol the Southern Political Science 
Association, November 7, al Gatlin- 

buig. lennessee. Dr. Huidette's topic 
was "Political [rends in the South and 
the Nation." 

RADIO STATION WTOP BROAD! \sis 
HISTORY SEMINAR 

F.arly morning Washington listeners 
heard an example oi higher educa- 
tion at its best last month, when one 



typical session ni Profeuoi Donald 
m (.onions graduate seminal in 
"British I oreign Policj 1870 1914" 
was broadcast ovei station WTOP's 
program I loi izons I aking part in 

the seminal discussion weie graduate 
students Mm. i Wcinslcin, dm (mod 

fellow, Gerald Shadell, Gerald Herd 

man. James \lckinsli\. Inn Smart, and 

Norman Moore, 

DR. Will I I ADDRESSES PRINC1 OEORGES 
( OUN IN ["EACHl RS 

Dr. J. Patrick White of the Historj De- 
partment addressed ISO secondary 
(Continued on next page) 



' r 



'*JPW 




What's beneath the surface? 

A man— his son— and a boat. It's a golden moment— one we'd all 
like to have last forever. But you, the man, grow older— and your 
son grows up. Now is the time to provide for his future, and for the 
rest of your family too. We will be pleased to discuss with you and 
your attorney the advantages of creating a Trust Fund either during 
your lifetime or by your will. In so doing, you will be safeguarding 
your family's future— no matter what is beneath the surface. 

FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK of Baltimore 

Main Office: Light & Redwood • Offices throughout Baltimore area • Member FDIC 



lANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



29 



school teachers of Prince Georges 
( ount) reoentl) on the impact upon 

■tea ol recenl Supreme ( ourt de- 

cisiona on civil rights and segregation. 
Sponsored b) the American Historical 
ciation and the local Board ol 
I ducation, the forum ol teachers hears 
addresses bj national!) prominent his- 
torians, and is designed to bring high 
school history teachers up to date on 
historical writing and interpretations. 
Posing the problem ol what should he 
the role ol the Courts in altering so- 
ciety Dr. White maintained that recent 
decisions had indeed altered the Con- 
stitution as it existed in 1789. How- 
ex cr. he held, the Court had always 
interpreted the Constitution to meet the 
changing problems of the times, and 
this was an essential of our govern- 
ment's success 



I'ROM.SSOR CHATELAIN POPULARIZES 
HJSTOR1 IHROUGHOUT THE STA I I 

During the past several months Profes- 
sor Verne E. Chatelain. one of the 
History Department's most popular 
speakers, has addressed at least a dozen 
scholarb and popular audiences on 
various aspects of Maryland history and 
on the role of the historian in modern 
society. Maintaining a thoroughly 
scholarly and at the same time enter- 
taining approach before historical so- 
cieties. Chambers of Commerce, wom- 
en's clubs, and fraternal organizations. 



Professor ( haHain has genuinely 
stimulated audiences throughout the 
State with the richness ot histor\ and 
the meaning ot intellectual excitement. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

J. A. Duiker 



GAMMA IHI I \ I PSI1 <)N \C I l\ 1 
Two >ears ago. the Beta Phi Chapter 
of Gamma Theta Upsilon — a profes- 
sional fraternity that seeks to advance 
the teaching and scientific aspects of 
geography — was installed on the cam- 
pus. This is a national fraternit> and 
its members reflect many of outstand- 
ing people in the field of geography . 

At present the local chapter has a 
total of 42 members. Most of the 
members, who are now Maryland 
alumni, are still active in the chapter. 
The group is made up of foreign stu- 
dents, undergraduates, graduate students 
and staff members, thus contributing 
a wide and varied influence on its 
character. 



In 1957 the group devoted most of 
its time to fundamental organization 
problems. This \ear an active program 
has been scheduled. A field trip to 
John Browns Cave near Harper's 
Ferry launched the fall semester. In 
December. Dr. Ho\t Lemons, a con- 
tributor to the United States Interna- 
tional Geophysical Year program, gave 
a talk on the Arctic Region: it d« 
with the American phase of the I.G.Y. 
program there and the group discuss 
the changing geographical significanc 
of this new "buffer zone." Late in the 
spring semester. G. Etzel Pearcy. pro- 
gram chairman for the Middle Atlantic 
Division of the American Association 
of Geographers and member of the 
geograph) branch of the State Depart- 
ment, will discuss the boundars and 
plotting problems of the so-called 3 
mile limit. 

The Chapter will endeavor to make 
a real contribution to the cultural land- 
scape of College Park 



NOM \ COM 1 Rl M I 

Dr. Athur Patrick. Head of the Depart- 
ment of Office Management and Tech- 
niques, served as General Chairman 
for the Tenth Annual Office Manage- 
ment Conference held on the College 
Park Campus. 

One hundred office executives, repre- 
senting 10 states and the District of 
Columbia, attended the three dav con- 



(^loi'crtiinil 
oUu irij 

/- roil net. i 
V] at die J 

h 

vs^uatitu 




yentcc 



CLOVERLAND--THE DAIRY WITH COWS (Calves, too) 

► Visit Cloverland's Golden Guernsey Farm — Dulaney Valley A 
Road — 8 miles north of Towson. Milking starts at 4 P. M. ^ 



30 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



fcrence. I Ik- conference was joint!} 
sponsored by the College ol Business 
ami Public Administration and the 
Chapters ol the National Office Man- 
agement Association in the Area 111. 
Dr. Patrick is the National Director for 

the Area III Chapters of NOMA. 

Outsanding speakers from the man- 
agement field included Harry E. Steim- 
ling, Donald J. Day. Hen S. Graham, 
Francis X, Gallaher, and Laurence R. 
Masse. In addition to concentrating on 
their theme. "Profit Improvement 
Through Office Operations." the con- 
terence participated in the B.P.A. 
career night program by offering their 
knowledge of business positions in an 
attempt to help students decide on their 
major interest and the availability of 
positions in these fields. 

BROWN TO HEAD F.B.L.A. 

James G. Brown, instructor in the Col- 
lege of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration, has been named State Advisor 
for the Future Business Leaders of 
America. At present there are 19 active 
chapters of the F.B.L.A. in Maryland. 
Plans are now being made for the State 
convention to be held on the College 
Park Campus in April. 

Mr. Brown has also been elected 
President of Pi Delta Eta, a local 
honorary fraternity of business educa- 
tors in Maryland. 

ATTEND AAA MEETINGS 

Professors S. M. Wedeberg, Howard 
W. Wright. LeRoy L. Lee and John 
Daiker attended the annual American 
Accounting Association meetings held 
this summer at the Syracuse University. 

DODGE IN GERMANY 

Professor Norton T. Dodge, Economics 
Department, attended a three weeks 
conference on Soviet Economics held 
in Munich. Germany. Ten economists, 
from the United States and several 
European countries, participated in a 
series of meetings and discussions de- 
signed to explore current research in 
the field of Soviet economics in their 
respective countries and to evaluate 
recent developments inside the Soviet 
Union. The host organization was the 
Institute for the Study of the U.S.S.R. 
and the sponsor was the American 
Council on Germany. 

DR. TAFF LECTURES 

Dr. Charles Taff spoke to the World 
Wide Air Force Transportation Officers 
Conference on "Trends in Transporta- 
tion" at Orlando AFB, Orlando, Florida 
(Continued on next page) 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 




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Investigate the outstanding 
promotion opportunities at 
Douglas. 

It stands to reason that the 
biggest field for advancement 
lies where the biggest programs 
involving advanced technology 
are under way. 

At Douglas, massive missile, 
space and transport projects in 
both military and commercial 
areas have created a continu- 
ous demand for engineers and 
scientists with backgrounds 
outride as well as in the avion- 
ics, aircraft and missile fields. 

As these projects grow in 
scope, the multiplying super- 
visory and executive openings 
are filled by Douglas engineers 
from within the company. This 
promotion policy has made 
Douglas a prime organization 
for the engineer who wishes to 
advance in his profession. 

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on November 4. On November 13 
Dr. I all spoke to the Pittsburgh Cham- 
ber of Commerce at their Fall meeting 
on the "St. Laurence Seawav — Devel- 
opments and Potentials." 

i i ii ki \i HOPKINS 
J. Albert M. Lettre. '48, is the recipient 
ol a fellowship in the Master ol Arts 
in Teaching program at the Johns Hop- 
kins University. I he Department of 
Education there offers this experimental 
program to college graduates who 
would like to qualify for a career 
icachmg such high school subjects as 
I njlish. science, mathematics, foreign 
languages, and social studies. 

Mr. Lettre has been working under 
this program since June. 1958. His 
one semester internship of full-time, 
full-pay. full responsibility teaching of 
social studies is being done in Clifton 
Park Junior High School. Baltimore 
City. His program also includes a 
semester of graduate work in his major 
field. He is expected to complete 
teacher certification requirements and 
receive the M.A.T. degree in June. 
1959. 



College of 

EDUCATION 

Berry Coleman 



I'L Bl U \l [ONS 
A list of articles, books for teachers 
and parents prepared by the Institute 
tor Child Study. College of Education. 
appears in the October issue of Child- 
hood Education under the title "Selec- 
tive Bibliography on Self." 

Dr. Daniel Prescott's book The Child 
in the Educative Process published by 
McGraw Hill is listed among the Out- 
standing Educational Books of 1957. 
Dr. Prescott is Director o\ the Institute 
for Child Study. 

An article "Beware the Stay-in- 
School Bandwagon" written by Dr. 
Richard H. Bvrne. Professor of Educa- 
tion, appeared in the Personnel and 
Guidance Journal. March 1958. 

Row. Peterson and Company. Evans- 
ton. Illinois, published a new book 
Before the Child Reads written by Dr. 
James L. Hymes. Director oi the Child- 
hood Education Program. 

GRADUATES 

Barbara Wright Cabaniss. '56. is now 
leaching kindergarten in Fairbanks. 

Alaska. 



Margaret Guv Schmidt. '58. was the 
first girl at the L'niversitv of Maryland 
to earn an "M" and the first girl to 
become a member of the M Club. 
Margaret earned her "M" for her par- 
ticipation on the Rifle team. At one 
time she held six records in shooting, 
three junior and three women's, and 
has won 200 medals and three trophies. 
Margaret is now married and teaching 
at McCormick Elementary School in 
Langlev Park. 

1957-58 HONOR t 1ST 
Fourteen students in the College of 
Education received a 3.5 or above aver- 
age. The following received straight 
"A": Doris R. Aaronson. Grace V. 
Clark. Eugene J. Colgan. Linda Lou 
Cooper. Helen C. DayhofT. Leila Eber- 
sole. Diane M. Gysel. Ellen Sue Hand- 
man and Carole Gilmore Kushner. 

STAFF PARTICIPATION IN 
EDLCATIONAI MEETINGS 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson. Dean of the 
College of Education, gave a talk on 
"Organizing for Curriculum Improve- 
ment" November 13 to the Washington 
Area School of Study Council which 
met at the Lniversitv of Marvland. 

Dr. James L. Hvmes. Director of the 
Childhood Education Program, spoke 
on "A Challenge to Teacher Education 
Today" to the Teacher Education Sec- 
tion at the Marvland State Teacher 



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32 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE I 



Association Meeting in Baltimore, Oc 

tober 17. 

Dr. Orval I I Iry, Associate Profes- 
voi of Education and Assistant Director 
ol Summer Session, spoke to the Inter- 
mediate School P. 1 A.. Silver Spring, 

on November 5 on "Science in the 
Elementary School." Dr. Ulrj was a 
delegate for the Lewisdale Elemental \ 
School to the State Convention oi the 

Maryland Parent Teacher Association. 
November 6 and 7. 

Dr. Donald Maley. Professor and 
Head of the Department of Industrial 
Education, served as a consultant at 
the Frederick County Workshop for 
teachers. He worked with the teachers 
in the areas of Industrial Arts and Vo- 
cational Agriculture. On October 20 
Dr. Maley served as a consultant at a 
workshop sponsored by the Prince 
:George's County Board of Education 
at Suitland, Maryland. At this meeting 
Dr. Maley presented materials and ideas 
directed toward a more effective in- 

tructional program through the use of 
teaching aids. On October 27 he par- 
ticipated as a panel member at the 
annual Supervisors' Conference spon- 

ored by the Maryland State Depart- 
ment of Education. The meeting was 
held in Baltimore. Dr. Maley appeared 
before the supervisors of Industrial 
^Education. Vocational Agriculture, and 
Distributive Education. On November 
3, Dr. Maley was the principal speaker 
jat a meeting of Industrial Arts, Voca- 
tional-Industrial, Vocational Agricul- 
ture, and Diversified Occupations teach- 

rs of Montgomery County. The 
meeting was held at Rockville. Dr. 
Maley presented a number of instruc- 
tional methods aimed at program im- 
provement in laboratory classes. Dr. 
Maley was the guest of the Industrial 
; Arts Department of the State Teachers 
|College at Millersville, Pennsylvania on 
ovember 6 and 7. During the two 

ay period. Dr. Maley participated on 
fhree panel sessions, visited a number 
jof the local schools and gave a lecture 
ito the advanced students in the depart- 
ment. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 
PLAYS HOST TO S.N.E.A. 

The members of the Student National 
Education Association of the College 
of Education were guests of the Indus- 
trial Education Department on October 
28. After a brief business meeting, the 
Association was given a tour of the 
building with several of the depart- 
ment's staff and students serving as 
guides, and describing the activities of 
(Continued on next page) 



153 



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the Department. Refreshments were 
served the group and the evening was 
climaxed h\ a stair member giving the 
visitors a detailed account ot some of 
the newer trends in the held of Indus- 
trial Education as well as some of the 
new programs being carried on by the 
Department. 

INDl SI Kl \l ISIS PAY A VISM K) I III 

INDUSTRIAL li)i<\iio\ DEPARTMEN1 

The Department ot Industrial Educa- 
tion was visited on October 16 by three 
representatives 1'rom the American Iron 
and Steel Institute. I he visitors had 
come to the Department to view some 
ot the techniques, procedures, and ma- 
terials used by it in the teaching of 
metals as a part of the teacher-educa- 
tion program. The industrialists were 
given an overview of four new pro- 
grams along with exhibit materials that 
have been developed in Industrial Edu- 
cation. The visitors acclaimed the work 
of the Department and gave recognition 
to it for its pioneering and educational 
endeavors. 



SECOND ANNUAL "DAY ON CAMPUS 

HELD BY INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Industrial Educa- 
tion was the host to forty-three pro- 
spective Industrial Arts teachers and 
their sponsors consisting of twenty 
teachers currently teaching Industrial 
Arts. This year's event was held on 
October 1 I and followed a procedure 
set up the previous year. 

A number of selected high school 
Industrial Arts teachers were invited to 
bring to the campus two seniors who 
had expressed an interest in Industrial 
Arts teaching. The day started with a 
registration at the Industrial Education 
building and then a tour of the campus. 
Upon returning to the building the 
group witnessed a series of special 
demonstrations followed by a delicious 
chicken dinner. Following the dinner 
the group heard short informal talks 
given by Dr. Vernon Anderson. Dean 
of the College of Education: Mr. Her- 
schel M. James. State Director of Vo- 
cational Education: Mr. William Otto, 
president of Nu Chapter. Iota lambda 
Sigma: and Dr. Donald Maley, Profes- 
sor and Head of the Industrial Educa- 
tion Department. 

The group next proceeded to the 
Stadium where thej were guests of the 
University at the Texas A. & M. foot- 
ball game. 

This "Da\ on Campus" activitj is 
one of the important teacher-recruit- 




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34 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



ment activities carried on bj the De- 
partment. I his year's program was 
sponsored by the Department and Nu 
Chapter of lota Lambda Sigma, profes- 
sional fraternit} in Industrial Education. 

DR. M W 1 1 SPl \KS IO (.1K1 SCOUT 
LEADERS At RBGIONA1 CONFERENCE 

Dr. Donald Male\ gave an illustrated 
lecture on the "Effective Utilization of 
Instructional Aids" to a group of fifty- 
live Girl Scout leaders. The meeting 
was a part of a Regional Conference 
held by the group. Dr. Maley's lecture 
was given on November 1 1 in the J. M. 
Patterson Building at the College Park 
Campus. The presentation featured an 
elaborate tlannel board presentation 
supplemented by a number of projected 
and graphic aids. The program was 
given in cooperation with the College 
of Special and Continuation Studies. 

PROMOTION 

Mrs. Dolores S. Lloyd has been ap- 
pointed Vice-Principal of the Col- 
gate Elementary School in Baltimore 
County. Mrs. Lloyd attended the Mary- 
land State Teachers College, received 
her Bachelor of Science degree and 
her Master of Education degree from 
the University of Maryland. She is a 
member of the Teachers' Association of 
Baltimore County, the Maryland State 
Teachers' Association and is a life 
member of the National Education 
Association. 



College of 

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A . Bernard Eyler 



MAN MASTERS MOUNTAIN 

William S. (Bill) Bissell, Aeronautical 
Engineering '52, climbed Mt. Whitney, 
highest point in the United States, in 
September, in a fierce electrical storm 
with a party of men and Explorer Boy 
Scouts. Bill has been a Scout Master 
in Grenada Hills, California for two 
years. 

"From Whitney Portals (elevation 
8,000 feet)," writes Bill, "we hiked to 
Trail Lake (12,000 feet) the first day. 
Altitude did not bother us as long as 
we took it very slow, with now and 
then a big heave to get more oxygen. 
^At night the sky alternately showed 
billions of stars and clouded up to 
storm . . ." 

(Continued on next page) 




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He continues. "We got up at 6 a.m. 
1 1 w pancakes and syrup, bacon, and 
"hot' chocolate. As we started climb- 
ing again it began to sleet. From there 
to Whitney Pass (13,300 feet) it was 
V i miles with 150 switchbacks on the 
trail . . . the clouds closed in tight and 
a whistling electrical storm roared in 
with sleet. I here were perfect ice cubes 
'n, inch square. ( I he engineer and 
his micrometer scale!.) Just one-quarter 
of a mile to go!" 

( ontinuing the climb. "Each light- 
ning (lash squeezed an extra spurt of 
sleet from the clouds so that the trail 
was white. Up past the last snow field 
(from last winter's snow) — arrival at 
the top at 1 1 :30 a.m. Sat on the high- 
est cairn (14,501 feet) and ate lunch. 
Hiked back down to Whitney Portals in 
four-and-a-half hours. 

When not climbing mountains. Bill 
works as "A" designer for Lockheed 
Aircraft Corporation. Burbank. Cali- 
fornia, where he has been for the past 
six years. About his work he says. "I 
am working in Special Projects Division 
which designed and built Lockheed's 
Jctstar in 241 days. This is a 10-place 
personnel transport for commercial and 
Air Force travel." 

Bill is married to Mary Clunk, Edu- 
cation *52. They have four children. 

BURNS NAMED SUPERINTENDENT 

Harold J. Burns, E.E. '35, was recently 
promoted to Superintendent of Service 
Department for the Washington Gas 
Light Company. Washington. D. C. 
While at the University. Mr. Burns won 
his "M" as a member of the boxing 
team in 1933 and 1934. He now resides 
at 5005 Allen Road. Yorktowne Vil- 
lage. Maryland. 

HUEBSCH TO CALIFORNIA 

John P. Huebsch. '33. recently became 
a supervisory construction management 
engineer with the Air Force Ballistic 
Missile Division. Air Research and 
Development Command at Inglewood. 
California. Huebsch was formed) 
Deputy Director of the Air Force 
Academy Construction Agency. He was 
named Deputy Director of the Agency 
when it was formed on June 4. 1954. 
He was the top civilian employee in 
the Agency. 

EVANS APPOINTED CHIEF 

Robert L. Evans. M.E. '29, was recently 
appointed Chief, of Division 36, Meas- 
urement and Testing of the U.S. Patent 
Oflice in Washington. His home ad- 
dress is 3512 Third Avenue. North 
Arlington. Virginia. 



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THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



I u i i r\ NOTES 

Professor John W. Jackson of the 
Department of Mechanical Engineering 
has resumed his duties in that Depart 
tnenl alter spending a year as the 
recipient of a Smith-Mundt Grant at 
the Engineering School of the Middle 
East Technical University. Ankara. 
Turkey. 

Professor J. M. Burgers of the Insti- 
tute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied 
Mathematics presented by invitation a 
paper on the Derivation of the Fokker- 
Planck equation for a fully-ionized gas 
at a Research Conference held in Troy, 
New York on October 23 and 24. 

Returning to the University after a 
sabbatical year abroad are Dr. Shan-fu 
Shen of the Department of Aeronau- 
tical Engineering and Dr. Shih I. Pai 
of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics. 

Professor William A. Wockenfuss of 
the Department of Mechanical Engi- 
neering is on leave of absence as a 
Danforth Fund Fellow at the Uni- 
versitv of Florida. 



SPOT CHECK ON RECENT GRADS 

Robert Clery who received his B.S. in 
C. E. in 1957 was appointed in Septem- 
ber to the staff of Wesley Junior Col- 
lege of Dover, Delaware. Prior to his 
appointment he was employed by the 
Gilbert Cummins and Company of 
Baltimore. Maryland. 

Edward G. Howard was recently 
named as the Washington representative 
of Pesco Products Division of the Borg- 
Warner Corp. 

Upon completion of the Bethlehem 
Steel Company's Loop training pro- 
gram. Donald Berlan, '58, Edwin Mat- 
thai. '58, Robert Schmidt. '58, and 
William E. Scarborough, '58, have been 
assigned to the Sparrows Point plant. 
Thomas Rose, '58, was placed with 
Ship Building Central Technical Sec- 
tion at Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Jerry W. Bradley, '58, is engaged in 
engineering research at the Patuxent 
Naval Research Station. 

Henry M. Stromberg, '58, is em- 
ployed at Aircraft Armaments of 
Cockeysville, Maryland. 

Irving B. Baugher, '58. joined Min- 
neapolis Honeywell Corporation in 
Washington, D. C. as a Sales Engineer 
of Commercial Control Equipment. 

WHEN LAST HEARD FROM 

Henry G. Knoche, '36, serving as Vice 
President of John K. Ruff Inc. General 
Contractors. 
Harry B. Benefiel, '51, employed as 
(Continued on next page) 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



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.1 Mechanical Engineer tor the Naval 
Ordnance Laboratory at White Oaks. 
Mar\ land 

Dean D. How aid. M S . '52, serving 
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Wilbur B. Montgomery, '23. Man- 
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Frank W. Rothenhoeffer. Sr.. '26. in 
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Frank A. Fazzalari. B.S. '48— M.S. 
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engineer, living in Canton. Ohio. 

Charles E. Hodgson. '54. with Eitton 
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a design Engineer. 

Charles H. Roos. B.S. ME. "51. is 
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morial Institute in Columbus. Ohio. 
His work is involved primarily in 
natural gas transmission lines and in 
special problems of experimental and 
theoretical stress analysis. Previoush 
he had six years experience as an engi- 
neer in petroleum refining industries 
in the L'nited States and overseas. 

S. T. Piszkin. Jr.. B.S., Ae.E. 1956, 
is aerodynamicist at Convair Division 
of General Dynamics, at San Diego. 
California. 



\I\V FACULTY MEMBERS 

Members of the Engineering Faculty 
who joined the staff in September in 
the ranks of Professorships and Instruc- 
torships include Dr. Charles T. G. 
Looney. Head of the Department and 
Dr. Henry A. Lepper. Jr.. Professor of 
Civil Engineering: Dr. John C. Ward. 
Visiting Research Professor. Dr. Louis 
J. Lions and Dr. Wilhelmus J. Witte- 
man. Fellows. Dr. Helmut D. We\- 
mann. Assistant Research Professor and 
Dr. Wolfgang Walter. Research Asso- 
ciate in the Institute for Fluid Dynam- 
ics and Applied Mathematics: Robert 
M. Ciinnings. William R. Hahn. Jr. and 
Harold C. Jones. Instructors in Elec- 
trical Engineering: Warren G. Lambert 
and Allan M. Thomas, Instructors in 
Mechanical Engineering: William W. 
Gcrken. Robert W. Madey and Thomas 
G. McWilliams. Jr.. Instructors in 
Chemical Engineering. 

UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR LECTURES 
AT EUROPEAN UN1VERS1TI1 s 

Professor Alexander Weinstein of the 

Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Ap- 
plied Mathematics in the College of 



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38 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Engineering lectured at two European 

Universities duriny the past summer. 

He was invited h\ the I niversit) ol 
Paris, France, ami the Universitj ol 
Bern, Switzerland, to report on Ins 
researches in the field of partial diffei 
ential equations. 

His lecture reported on some inter- 
esting connections between subharmonic 
functions and partial differential equa- 
tions ol hyperbolic and parabolic type 
v. Inch Professor Weinstein discovered 
recent I \ . 

PUBLICATIONS 

Dr. F. T. Mavis. Dean of the College 
of Engineering, and Dr. R. G. Crum. 
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineer- 
ing at Carnegie Institute of Technology, 
are authors of the paper entitled "Be- 
havior of Certain Alloys Subjected to 
Dynamic Load" published in the July, 
1958, issue of the bulletin, American 
Society for Testing Materials. 

Dr. Charles T. G. Looney. Head. 
i Department of Civil Engineering, is the 
author of the paper entitled "High 
Speed Computer Applied to Bridge 
Impact" published in the Proceedings. 
American Society of Civil Engineers, 
September. 1958. 

I'\RKER NAMED DIRECTOR AT RIGGS 

Ah in M. Parker, '26, was recently 
lamed a Director of Riggs National 
Bank. Mr. Parker has been with the 
Smoot Sand & Gravel Corporation for 
Jl \ears. becoming a Director in 1937. 
He is presently Vice President and 
Treasurer. He is also a Director of the 
Alexandria National Bank and of 
Smoot Properties, Inc. 

KETTEL PROMOTED 

\nton G. Kettel. '51. who is with the 
Zhas. Pfizer & Co., Inc., Brooklyn, 
vas recently promoted. Formerly 
Manager of New Products Coordina- 
ion, he has been transferred to the 
bffice of the Administrative Vice Presi- 
lent. He had served in his former 
position since 1955. 

RECOGNITION ACCORDED 

Tharles F. Cashell, '31, recently re- 
vived his third "Outstanding" work 
>erformance rating at the U.S. Army 
ngineer Research and Development 
aboratories. Fort Belvoir, Virginia. He 
:ceived the award from Col. A. H. 
avidson. Jr., Director. Mr. Cashell 
ined the Laboratories in February, 
j 9 42, and is Assistant Chief of the 
plectrical Engineering Department. He 
esides at 512 Yorktown Rd.. Alexan- 
dria. Virginia. 

ANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



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Dobbs Hats - Bostonian Shoes 

6033 Baltimore Blvd. (between Riverdale and Hyattsville) 

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championship golf course — this is the 
new "Capital of the Resort World" — 
a new international playground that in- 
dulges your every whim! 

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splendor — it gives you the unparalleled 
convenience of an exclusive golf course 
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your choice of four swimming pools, a 
hundred colorful luxury cabanas, tourn- 
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sea fishing craft in its yacht dockage on 
the intracoastal waterway, five exciting 
cocktail lounges — and pampers \ou 
with the extravagance of seven dining 
looms, each with a different atmosphere 
and menu! 

Yes. this is the life — this is the Year 
of the Diplomat. 



But cold winter days are upon us 
here in Maryland and hot desserts are 
welcome now as they are during the 
holiday season just past. 

Flaming puddings have been famous 
parts of holiday feast literature for cen- 
turies, but almost every homemaker 
who has tried to serve a flaming pud- 
ding has had to give up with poor 
results. This year, flaming pudding can 
climax the dinner in every home, thanks 
to an easy, simple recommendation 
made by the CROSSE & BLACK- 
WELL Food laboratories. The food 
specialists were experimenting with 
added flavors for their plum, fig 



C-or«/rt//j 



aUinn 



eri 




Elmer Rigby's 
Taylor House 

Facilities for Private Parties 
TAYLOR AVENUE AT 
LOCH RAVEN BLVD. VALLEY 3-6252 

Baltimore, Md. 
(PLEASANT PLAINS SHOPPING CENTER) 
CLASS 43 



40 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZIN 



If 



amen 



and date puddings to complement the 
generous quantities of aged brandies 
used. The Crosse ^ Blackwell Home 
1 conomics Department. 6801 Eastern 

Avenue. Baltimore, suggests that when 
lemon or orange extract is poured over 
a pudding, and it is then touched with 
(a match, magnificent flames surround 
the pudding. 

At home, the Crosse and Blackwell 
specialists suggest that you open the 
steamed can of pudding and turn it 
out on a warmed platter. Before carry- 
ing it into the dining room, pour 3 
iteaspoonfuls of extract over the pud- 
ding. Hold a match near the liquid, and 
take it to the dining table immediately. 
Flames will surround your pudding for 
several minutes and add glamour to 
your festive dessert. When flames 
flicker down, slice the pudding into in- 
dividual servings and top each with a 
generous portion of already prepared 
brandied hard sauce. The hard sauce 
kind your favorite pudding — plum, fig 
! and date — are available in ready-to- 
serve form. 

Your pudding served on a lovely 
silver platter from the collection of old 
silver of the UNIVERSAL ELECTRO 
PLATING. INC. will compliment your 
table. The firm at 1067 Wisconsin 
Avenue. Northwest, in old Georgetown, 
lias a fascinating collection of imported 



The Best 
'Northern Chinese 

Food in the 
^Nation's Capital 

ptuUce 



"We Entertain 

More Diplomats Daily 

Than the White 

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International 
Cocktails 

Yenching Palace 

3524 Conn. Ave. N.W. 

(at Porter St.) 

EM 2-6358 Wash., D. C. 



antique treasures just arrived from 

Europe both ill old silver plate and 
sterling silver, Man) of the items are 

of rare heirloom value. 

John E. Houch, president ol the firm, 
and his wife, the former Catherine 
Burger, are graduates of the UniversitJ 
of Maryland. Mr. Houch joined the 
organization in I c >4<> and during the 
short period between 1946 and 1951 
became the president of the Company, 

Universal Electro Plating Company 
Inc. was organized in 1429 by Clarence 
Burger, grandfather o\ Mrs. Houch. 
The company gained a reputation for 
their superb work in the restoration of 
valuable silver and gold articles. Num- 
bered among their clients is the White 
House and the foreign Embassies in 
the nation's capital, as well as customers 
from all over the world. 

One of the very interesting restora- 
tion accomplishments of the firm was 
an antique sulky for Mrs. Trevor 
Gardner, wife of the former Assistant 
Secretary of the Air Force. Mrs. 
Gardner shows horses all over the 
country and uses her antique sulky in 
the shows. The chromium plating on 
this job was finished in real artistry. 

Jewelers, antique dealers, churches. 



^rro it a n der $ 
As e 3 ta ii run t 




the same 

DELICIOUS FOOD AND 

COCKTAILS 

DELIGHTFUL 

ATMOSPHERE 



hotels and clubs use the services ol tins 
firm whose work ranks among the 

iiiicsi in the counti \ 



In old ["owsontown there is a famous 
restaurant where Baltimoreans enjoy 
dining and today, more then ever, 
Bl RNI1 Mis n \\ hoi i i enjoys 
a prestige patronage. 

Bernie Lee, a well known restaura- 
teur of Baltimore, purchased the Penn 
Hotel in 1^57 and almost immediately 
started to improve the old building, 
(Continued on next page) 



- X X X X X X X X X 4. X X X 4. 4, X XX X 4-4- 4. 4. X X J 




Breath-faking Beauty! 

MANO SWARTZ 
MINK STOLES 

from vj) I 77 



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Prices plus tax. Furs labeled country of origin. 






SALISBURY RUG COMPANY 

700 N. SALISBURY BLVD. SALISBURY, MD. 

Phone PI 2-1129 

COMPLETE LINE OF RUGS AND CARPETS 



CARPET 

INSTALLATION 
SPECIALISTS 




CLEANING OF 
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JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1959 



4 1 



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MoAdficuHxi WcWtt&H, 



which during the ( ivil War days was 
the home o\ the late Major and Mrs. 
Ydiot \t the turn of the century the 

home was purchased b\ Mr. "Hill>" 
\l.uin and he developed the Penn 
Hotel, [owson's only hotel. 

[*oday, under the capable direction 
ol Mr lee. I he Penn Hotel located at 
15 West Pensylvania Ave. boasts of five 
banquet balls, a small public dining 
room called the Hunt Room, a large 
public dining room known as the Cara- 
van Room, a large cocktail lounge and 
1 he Pub Room. 

I he restaurant features tine Marx- 
land Sea Foods and other famous 
Southern dishes. 

Mr. lee's experience encompasses a 
period of many years. He was w ith the 
old Mart} Welsh Restaurant of Fayette 
Street for 18 years, and the Old Irish 
House, of Ocean City, Maryland, from 
1935 until 1954. 

During the first year under Mr. Lee's 
capable leadership the Bernie Lee Penn 
Hotel has spent upwards of SI 75.000 in 
remodeling and repairing, and today, 
everything from the kitchen to the new 
banquet halls is attractive and ultra 
modern. 

Mr. Lee is a genial host and dinner 
or luncheon at Bernie Lee's Penn Hotel 
is a jo> long to be remembered. 



A good book from COKESBURY 
BOOK STORE. 516 North Charles 
Street in Baltimore, is a "must" for re- 
laxing during these busy days and a 
feu are listed helou that are new and 
inspiring. 

I K HON 



"The Rainbow utiil the Rose" by 
Nevil Shute. 

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"Lolita" by Vladimir Nabokov. 

"Around the World With Auntie 
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"The Ugly American" by William J. 
Lederer and Eugene Burdick. 

NON-1 U Hon 

"Only In America" b\ Ham Golden. 

"Out Of My Heart" by Agnes Sligh 
I urnbull. 

"Kids Say The Darnclest Things!" b\ 
Art Linkletter. 

"And A Rii>ht Good Crew" b\ Emily 
Kimbrough. 

"Twixt Twelve and Twenty" b) Pat 
Boone. 



'/)<« tor Zhivago" by Boris Paster- 



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In_ Old Georgetown Since 1929 

SPECIALIST 
in 

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Quality Work — Prompt Service 

Hours: 9 o.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily 
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for estimates and information 
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Baltimore, Md 




VISIT 
Bernie Lee's 

PENN HOTEL 

i Newly renovated) 

OPEN DAILY 8 a.m. — 2 am 
serving 

BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 

DIXXER 

5 — Spacious Banquet Rooms 
Call VA 3-0300 for reservation 

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IS W. Penn. Avenue 
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Established For Over 100 Years 



42 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZIf 



College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 



Marianna Keene 



i UU I R DAI SIM c IM 11 KB 

|The College of Home Economics held 
a Career Day Spectacular on Novem- 
ber 14. l l >5S. The program, geared to 
all aspects of home economics and re- 
lated art. was planned for high school 
students, teachers and parents. 

The program began with automotive 
tours of the campus. After registering. 
guests were allowed to plan their own 
schedule, according to the amount of 
time they could spend. 

The Home Economics Career Pag- 
eant, one of the highlights of the day, 
was held during the afternoon's general 
assembly. Career Centers related to 
Home — School — Community, Business 
and Industry. Research — Communica- 
tions and International Understanding 
were on display during the morning and 
late afternoon. College of Home Eco- 
nomics classes gave teaching demon- 
strations in Art in Advertising and 
Costume. Crafts. Creative Weaving, 
Why Foods Behave As They Do, How 
and Why of Cheese, Egg and Milk 

fookery, Clothing for Today's Fami- 
;s. and Learning About Textiles. 
Other features of the day included 
colored films of Home Economics Ac- 
tivities, tours of the Home Management 
House and general career information. 
The program was planned by a stu- 
dent-faculty committee and Dean Selma 
F. Lippeatt. 

ART TALENT DISCOVERY 

There were four hundred entries of oil 
paintings in the Forty-fifth Annual 
Delaware Show of Oils and Sculpture, 
October 9 to November 9. The judges 
selected fifty of these paintings to be 
hung. One of the paintings, "Canal and 
Bridge" was done by Mrs. Henry J. 
Dorn. 'Cana! and Bridge" refers to the 
Maryland landmark, the bridge at 
Thesapeake City over the Chesapeake 
md Delaware Canal. 

In 1955 Camille Dorn obtained her 
M.S. in Nutrition at the University. 
>ince then she has been taking art les- 
ions at the Delaware Art Center. Her 
lusband. Henry J. Dorn, B.S. in Horti- 
culture, 1955, is also a University of 
Vfaryland graduate. He is now a re- 
search engineer for the Bond Crown 
division of Continental Can Co. Inc. 
n Wilmington, Delaware. Mr. Dorn 
(Continued on next page) 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



STANLEY COAL 



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The Coffee Room 
Anne Key's Kitchen 

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Cement - Sand - Pipe 

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General Offices 

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PHONES 

Main Office — Monument 3-3104 

Frederick, Md. Plant — Monument 2-1181 



NORMAN S. 

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General Contractors 
and Builders 

Plants — Homes — Stores 
Public Buildings 
435 E. BALTIMORE ST. 
Hagerstown, Maryland 

= CLASS 1947 ===== 



43 





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MEMBER ABAA 
OLD, RARE AND OUT-OF-PRINT BOOKS 
MARYLAND BOOKS - SCHOLARLY BOOKS 

805 N. HOWARD ST. 
Baltimore I, Md. 
ALLEN W. SCHULTZ 



headed the recent dn\e for the Greater 
University of Maryland Fund in the 
Wilmington area. 

I he couple is at present building a 
home at "Rondalia" on the I Iks River 
m Maryland. I he\ are looking for- 
ward to returning to Maryland. Mr. 
Dorn will commute to Wilmington. 

I I \SS si ( Rl I \KII S 

I he Home Economics Alumni Board 
in an effort to keep a more active and 
up-to-date file ol its alumni is trying 
OUt a plan whereby there will be a class 
secretary tor each year. Since this is 
the first attempt to set up the secretary 
system, only those serving for the 
twenties will be listed. The following 
people have agreed to serve for the 
years designated: 

1923 Nellie Davis (Mrs. Malcolm), 
R.F.D. #2. Hendron. Vir- 
ginia. 

1924 Lucy Knox. 4608 Knox Road. 
College Park. 

1925 Frances Wolfe, 9310 Brooke- 
ville Road. Silver Spring. 

1926 Mary Riley Langford (Mrs. 
George), 4606 Hart wick 
Road. College Park. 

1927 Josephine Blandford. 4105 
Wisconsin Avenue. Washing- 
ton 16. D. C. 

1928 Alice Burdick. 4006 Park- 
wood Drive, Baltimore 6. 

1929 Hazel Tuemmler (Mrs. Fred). 
4509 Beechwood Road. Col- 
lege Park. 

Write to your class secretary and 
give her news about yourself, your 
latest address and other interesting 
items. For each issue of The Maryland 
Magazine this year, a group of suc- 
ceeding years class secretaries will be 
listed. 

PROPOSED REVISIONS FOR 
ASSOCIATION CONSTITUTION 

The Constitution of the Home Eco- 
nomics Alumni Association was re- 
viewed at the Executive Board meet- 
ing on September 15. 1958. The 
following revisions were proposed: 

Ankle 17. Section 2 — Delete 
sentence reading "Thereafter the 
Chapter will elect annually one Direc- 
tor for a term of three years b\ mail 
ballot as herein prcnided." 

Ankle VI. Section 3 — Delete 
"not later than 45 days" 

Article 17. Section -I — Revise first 
paragraph to read "Voting for direc- 
tors shall be by voice or written ballot 
except for the election of the first Board 



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For complete service, please coll 

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44 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZIN 



oi Directors which shall be elected by 
voice or written ballot at the first an- 
nual meeting ol the Chapter." Delete 
entire second paragraph, 

Article I'll. Section I Revise first 
sentence reading "A nominating com- 
mittee of five members shall be elected 
In the Board of Directors.'' to read "A 
nominating committee of five or more 
members shall be elected b\ the Board 
of Directors." Delete entire following 
sentence. 

Article \ III. Section I — Add at end 
of first sentence "or in the Spring." 
.Delete from the second sentence "at 
least 60 days." 

Article VIII, Section 3 — Delete from 
the third sentence "Homecoming Day" 
and substitute in its stead "the Annual 
Meeting." 

Amendments, dated October 29, 
1949: 

Article I . Section 2 — Insert the 
words "or their alternates" following 
secretary and preceding "of its Alumni 
Association." 

The above revisions are published 
now in order that there be sufficient 
time to review them before the regular 
Home Economics Alumni meeting in 
\pril 1959. at which time a vote will 
be taken. 




Miss Woodard 



MISS WOODARD NAMED CHIEF HOSTESS 

Miss Betty Woodard, '54, has been 
named Chief Hostess for Allegheny 
Airlines, the Middle Atlantic Area local 
service airline serving the eastern 
United States. 

Miss Woodard is a native of 
Florence, South Carolina, and is 
presently living in Washington, D. C. 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



THE 

BALTIMORE ASPHALT 
BLOCK and TILE CO. 


BABCO 

HOT ASPHALT PAVEMENTS 

private driveways 
• industrial yards 
for 9 service stations 
9 playgrounds 
9 parking areas 


general 
contractors 


1320 N. MONROE ST. BALTIMORE 17, MD. 

Call: MAdison 3-4346 






_ ELIZABETH COONEY 




Jr^Y? PERSONNEL AGENCY 




jfc.'^l^Q Town & Country Service 




^rj V/«, i Practical Nurses, Maternity and Convalescent Care 
[ j^\ V " Baby Sitters & Companions, Day and Evening Appointments 
" Supervisors, Week-ends and Vacations 




1511 PENTRIDGE ROAD 


HO 7-8435 


BALTIMORE, MD. 


TU 9-4772 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

1020 WEST PRATT STREET 

Phone MUlberry 5-6070 Baltimore 23. Md. 



• WE SPECIALIZE IN RENTALS 

HANNES FORMAL WEAR 



TUXEDOS & FORMALS 

JUniper 9-0505 
PARKING FACILITIES 



"First in Silver Spring" 
8229 GEORGIA AVE. 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 

Diagonally across from Suburban Trust Co. 




45 



52nd ANNIVERSARY 



1906 




1958 



ARUNDEL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 



direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts ■ liberal dividends 

Insured up to S10000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

Christmas Clubs — Safe Deposit Boxes 

Community Hall for Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 daily 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 



PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25. Md. ELgin 5-9300 




Dependability and Service 

MORRISON & FIFER 

— Dispensing Chemists — 
Pail Auchambault, Prop. 

3109 ST. PAUL ST. BE 5-3579 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



B. & B. 
EXTERMINATORS, INC. 

SANITATION and PEST 
CONTROL SERVICE 

TERMITE SPECIALISTS 

Phones: LExington 9-2140 — 9-2141 

626 NORTH CALVERT ST. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



A LCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 

Phone VErnon 7-8400 

Baltimore, Md. 




School of 

LAW 



- XAX4.XXXXXAJ.J.XXXXXXXXXXXX4.. 
H 

-i 



Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



awards 10 Ol ["STANDING wosiw 

(.KADI All 

I he Baltimore News-Post has been 
awarding "Black-Eyed Susans" to Mary- 
landers whose actions deserve special 
recognition, via its editorial columns. 

One of the wearers of the "Susan"" is 
Mrs. Marxian K. Merrick ( Marrian 
Kuethe. '30). In addition to being an 
attorney. Mrs. Merrick is the mother 
ol two college-age sons and an outdoor 
sports enthusiast. She is presently Vice 
President and General Merchandising 
Manager of Hutzler Brothers Co. 

Mrs. Merrick has also been recog- 
nized by the Business and Professional 
Women's Club of Baltimore as its 1958 
Outstanding Woman of the Year. 

I Al HOT DENMEAD RETIRES 

lalbot Denmead. '00, has recently re- 
tired from long service in the Held of 
conservation. As a boy in Baltimore. 
Mr. Denmead can remember hunting 
quail near Twenty-fifth and St. Paul 
Streets. These early experiences in the 
out-of-doors prompted a lifetime of in- 
terest in the nation's game and fish 
resources. 

In 1906 Mr. Denmead was elected 
secretary of the Maryland State Game 
and Fish Protective Association and 
served for six years. In 1910 he was 
appointed by Governor A. A. Crothers 
as a member of a special Game and 
Fish Commission for Maryland. 

In 1921 Mr. Denmead entered Fed- 
eral service as Deputy Chief Game 
Warden for the United States. He held 
a number of positions with the govern- 
ment until his first retirement in 1947. 
At that time he was awarded a gold 
medal by the United States Department 
oi the Interior for '"outstanding service 
in the field of wildlife conservation." 

He returned to active service in 1948 
as a member of the staff of the public 
relations division of the Maryland 
Game and Inland Fish Commission. 

Now that he has retired permanently, 
Mr. Denmead plans to spend man) 
hours at his favorite sports- hunting 
and fishing. 

\ \krow escape: graduate lives to 
imi ABOUT IT 

Bob Pritchard. a 1947 graduate of the 
I a\\ School, is today in real estate prac- 
tice in Aurora. Illinois. The owner of an 
outstanding stamp collection, he is a 
leading philatelist and writer in the 



-i 

H 
■I 
•» 
-i 
-i 
H 
-) 
-J 
•» 
-» 
•» 
•» 
■» 

^ 
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-1 
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The Asphalt Service Co. 



Inc. 



1836 Chesapeake Ave. 
Elgin 5-1560-61 

Baltimore 26, Md. 



TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT 



rt 



Hendlers 




First Name in fee Cream 
For Over A Half Century 



PURITAN 
COMPRESSED 
GAS 
CORPORATION 

RACE & McCOMAS STS. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS. Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located in the Center of 
the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
MU. 5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



46 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZIN 



philatelic press. 

Nineteen years ago. he was aboard 
the liner "Athenia" when it was torpe- 
doed b\ the Germans in what is called 
the first "shot" of World War II. He 
spent eight hours adrift in an open life- 
boat before being rescued In the 
Norwegian freighter, "Knute Nelson." 

Hob attributes the fortunate escape 
from death partial!) to his having 
kissed the Irish Blame) Stone several 
times before boarding the ship! 



School of 

NURSING 



Lillie M. Largey 
Georgia Hinley 



NEWS 

Mrs. Charles J. Goetter. nee Forest 
Dale Macon. '45. writes, "my family is 
fine, my husband is now employed by 
RCA as radio technician, and is out of 
the country most of the time. I am 
working in a Doctor's office and like it 
very much. We do like Winter Park so 
\er\ much. Regards to all." 

tMrs. Charles E. Wilhelm. nee 
ercedes Brown, '19, writes," On the 
estern tour my husband and I took 
this summer (thirty-two days) Elizabeth 
iides McDonald and her husband met 
is on the Redwood Highway, Ukiah, 
'alifornia. having driven sixty miles 
forth and waited three hours in the 
totel to see us. Elizabeth is just the 
;ame dear little gal! Helen Pleasants and 
her husband talked with me over the 
telephone in San Francisco. They 
wanted to be remembered to you honey 
chile! 

"The last ten days of our trip my 
husband became seriously ill. Arriving 
home Sunday afternoon. Monday A. M. 
I took him to Baltimore and the doc- 
tor immediately sent him to the hos- 
pital (M.G.H.) and had him in an 
oxygen tent within a half hour. There 
three weeks. Quite ill for a time but 
now is better, under constant medica- 
tion." She also adds, Hady Macis, is on, 
stopping at Mitchell's, getting her 
license preparatory to driving to Cali- 
fornia where she and Dr. Macis will 
ake up residence in their new home on 
lis retirement which they hope will be 
around Christmas or January first the 
atest. Hady Macis and Edna Mitchell 
Mnith were members of the 1919 Class. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. Ewer, and 
:heir young son, are living in Millis, 
Connecticut. Mrs. Ewer was Elizabeth 
tharlene Willey, '52. 

(Continued on next page) 



Best for Baby . . . 



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225 224 

First with the "Carriage" Trade 



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Bus. LExington 9-8400— Ext. 216 
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BALTIMORE CHECK ROOM SERVICE 

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CHECKING FOR HOMES OR HALLS 

DAN MORACO Office Lord Baltimore Hotel Check Room 



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Consulting Structural Engineers 

American National Building 
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Travel Everywhere — 



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1115 N. Charles Street — Baltimore 1, Maryland 



By Steamer ... by Airline ... by Rail 

Independent and Conducted Tours 

Cruises . . . Resorts . . . Hotels 

Personalized Travel Service Since 1923 

LExington 9-7300 




CHINESE-AMERICAN RESTAURANT 

Chinese Food at Its Best 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 
Excellent Carry-out Service 

320 PARK AVE. MU 5-6790 

Baltimore, Md. 



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P.M. Speakers and 2 speaker enclosures. 

WHOLESALE RADIO PARTS CO., Inc. 
311 W. Baltimore St. Balto. 1, Md. 
Tel. MU 5-2134 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



47 



Student's Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 




Alumni 

Headquarters for 

• CI ISS EUNGS 

• CLOTH GOODS 

• ETCHED IJL ASSW AIU 

• ,ii \\i i in 

• ST ATIIIM \\\ 



Jfuller & briber! 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 



Since 1920 



Phone— Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



PESTS? 



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TERMITES? 




PEST CONTROLSINCEI86U 



C. WALTB Porter. Mgr. 

SAraloga 7-6118 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Baltimore 1. Md. 



II I II Ks 

Carrie Murray (Mrs. John R. Smith). 
'14. August 13. 19 
311 N. College Street 
Douglas, deorgia 

Dear Alumrun. 

I .mi always so glad when time comes 
lor the Bulletin, as it is almost my only 
way to keep up. although I do corres- 
pond with some of my classmates, al- 
though I have very little time for that. 
I am still active, night supervisor in a 
sixty -bed hospital, relieve night nurses 
too. But I realize my time for active 
duty is getting shorter, because of 
arthritis, as uell as age. which I feel 
creeping up on me. as I was one of the 
oldest girls in the 1914 Class. 

Very truly yours. 
Carrie M. Smith 



Demetria Wijangco. '54. July 23. 1958. 
APO 74 '"< Postmaster. San Francisco. 
California 

O.B. DEPT. Nursing Unit B-2. U.S.A.F. 
Hospital. 

Dear Mrs. Arnurius: 

Hello and greetings to you and 
eseryone! I am looking forward to re- 
ceiving the Bulletin. It has been two 
years since I left the University and I 
sure miss everyone, and the Hospitality 
oi the people of Maryland. 

I stayed nine months at the Univer- 
sity of Hawaii. I worked two days .. 
week at St. Francis Hospital. Oh I love 
to live in Hawaii, especially 1 love the 
weather \ery much. Now I am working 
at the Obstetrical Department of the 
U.S.A. F. Hospital in Clark Field, a 
few miles away from my home. I am 
working with an American nurse from 
Massachusetts. 

I wish I could meet the girls from 
my class who enlisted in the Air Force. 
We would have lots of fun. As for the 
routine over here similar to the Uni- 
\ersity Hospital routine. 

I met a doctor, class 1952. from Uni- 
\ersit\ ot Maryland. Captain Sindler 
over here. I was so pleased to see some- 
one from the University oi Maryland. 
Ho was so pleased to see the University 
ot Maryland nurse's cap. (1 am so hap- 
p\ and real proud of my Florence 
Nightingale cap ) . 

1 am always so happy to hear from 
anyone. With host wishes and regards to 
everyone 

Sincerely yours. 
Demetria Wijangco 



EASTERDAY - 

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ROOFING CO., Inc. 



SLAG ROOFING 

Repairing — Painting 
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2253 SHERMAN AVE., N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



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alumni of the. 

tinU-'e.riitu of 

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Hyattsville, Md. 
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OFFICE FURNITURE 

Fine Executive Desks and Chairs 

Leather Club Chairs and 

Davenports 

Steel Desks and Filing Cabinets 

THE JAMES T. VERNAY 
& SONS CO. 

5 E. LEXINGTON STREET 
Plaza 2-4220 Baltimore 2, Md. 



48 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZI 



School of 

PHARMACY 



Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 



FACULTY NO IT'S 

Dean \ool E. Foss and Dr. C. T. 
[chniowski, Professor of Pharmacology. 
attended the District No. 2 meeting of 
Boards and Colleges of Pharmacy in 

Niagara Falls. Canada, on October 25- 
26. 1958. 

Dr. Frank J. Slama. Professor of 
Pharmacognosy, Dr. Charles J. Koko- 
ski, Ph.D. '56, and Mr. Robert J. 
Kokoski, Junior Instructor in Pharma- 
cognosy, are authors of a publication 
which recently appeared in the Scienti- 
fic Edition of the Journal of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association. 
1 he title of their paper was '"Fluores- 
cence of Powdered Vegetable Drugs Un- 
der Ultraviolet Radiation." Methods for 
rapidly identifying over 150 plants were 
developed in the Department of 
Pharmacognosy. School of Pharmacy. 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos, Associate 
Professor. Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 
recently attended a three day retreat on 
cancer chemotherapy. Twenty-five 
scientists from all over the United States 
were invited to this retreat by the Na- 
tional Service Center for Cancer 
Chemotherapy. 

NATIONAL PHARMACY WEEK 

October 5-11 was National Pharmacy 
I Week. On October 9th the School of 
Pharmacy was host to the Baltimore 
Branch of the American Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association. Dr. Robert P. Fischelis, 
Secretary of the American Pharmaceu- 
tical Association, spoke on '"Our Profes- 
sional Prerogatives are at Stake." The 
meeting was attended by alumni, faculty 
and students. 

KLIOZE BECOMES DIRECTOR 

Dr. Oscar Klioze, Ph. D., Pharmaceuti- 
cal Chemistry '49, has been appointed 
Director of Product Development at A. 
H. Robbins Company, Richmond. Vir- 
ginia. 

FELLOWSHIPS TO 

Mr. Robert Havranek, M.S. Pharma- 
ceutical Chemistry'58,has been awarded 
a $1500 fellowship by the Noxzema 
Foundation. Inc. Mr. Havranek re- 
ceived his B.S. in Pharmacy at Colum- 
bia University in 1956. He is currently 
continuing his studies towards a Ph.D. 
in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

(Continued on next page) 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 




The 
Student 
\rii\ ities 



Building 



Boltimore 18, Md 

Phone: 

HOpkins 7-9700 

Washington, D. C. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

1408 Insurance Bldg. 
Phone: 5623 



DIETRICH 

BROTHERS 



STEEL WAREHOUSING 
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Home <>) the Fast-Moving 

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This graceful new building 

has an enduring steel frame- 
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Dietrich Brothers, tnc. 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 

6-8400 


Producers and Distributors of 
WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

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GRAVEL 

RE 
6-7100 








WASHINGTON 20, D.C. 







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PLANT: 



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WASHINGTON, D.C. 

BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfield 7-0880 



— LELAND L FISHER, Inc. — 

BUILDERS HARDWARE 

LUMBER — MILLWORK — PAINT 
Rockville, Md. POplar 2-61 23 



De! Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 
Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

Two Miles North — University Maryland 

AAA — Open Year Round 

Hot Water Heat 

Best Foods from our Restaurant 

WEbster 5-4852 



CHESTNUT FARMS 
DAIRY 

ADams 2-1011 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



49 



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No Ink! No Stencil! 
No Gelatin! 

Phone — NAtional 8-4262 

STANDARD 

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Washington, D. C. 

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BORNMANN - PATTYSON 
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1829 K Street, N. W. 
Washington, D. C. ME 8-6379 



HIDUIEU & HIDWELL, Inc. 

Plastering - Dry Wall 

Insulation 

Acoustical and Bricklaying 

BOX 266 COLLEGE PARK 

WEbst.r 5-4500 MD. 



\lr Venkatraya B. Gopal Shenoj has 
been awarded a $1,000 fellowship tor 

Stud) in pharmaceutical chemistry by 
the Hudnut Sales Company. Mr. Shenoj 
holds degrees in pharmacj and in 
chemistry and completed each ol these 
programs at the head ol his class and 
with perfect academic records. Prior to 
coming to the School ol Pharmacy, 
University ol Maryland, Mr. Shenoy 
was employed tor three years bj a 
British drug house. Two ol those years 
he served as director ol the analytical 
chemistry laboratory. 



/m-^ 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 




Mr. Lang 



LANG I'ROMOTI I) 



Louis W. Lang. '34. a Parke. Davis & 
Company sales representative since 
1936. was recently appointed a super- 
visor in the firm's Hospital Medical 
Service Division. In his new position. 
Mr. Lang will be responsible for the 
development of sales at Howard Uni- 
versity School of Medicine. D. C. Gen- 
eral Hospital. Freedman's Hospital, and 
the Veterans Administration Hospital, 
all in Washington. D. C. 

MYERS ELECTED TO HIGH POSITION 

Mr. Ellis B. Myers. '28. Executive Vice 
President of the Read Drug and Chemi- 
cal Company, operators of Read's 
Drug Stores, was elected President of 
Associated Chain Drug Stores at their 
annual meeting held recently at the 
Park Sheraton Hotel in New York 
City. Mr. Myers has been with Read's 
since 1929. 

Associated Chain Drug Stores is com- 
prised of 1600 chain drug stores 
throughout the United States. Total an- 
nual sales are estimated at S700.000.- 
000. 



mvSfc 



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933 Gist Avenue 

Silver Spring, Md. 

JU 9-4313 



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Chas. T. CLAYTON, President 

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Inc. 

Institutional Grocers 
3125 V STREET, N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

LA 6-8234 



SO 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Mr. Sanncr 

HI IOMES MANAGER OF CONVENTION 
EXHIBITS 

Mr. Richard T. Sanner. '24, assistant 
manager of professional relations for 
Parke. Davis & Company since 1951. 
has been appointed manager of con- 
vention exhibits for the firm, a world- 
wide organization. Mr. Sanner will be 
responsible for the design, procurement 
and distribution of all company exhibits 
as well as displays of Parke-Davis pro- 
ducts in pharmacy and medical school. 
He has been a member of the firm's 
sales department since joining the com- 
pany 20 vears ago. 



ALUMNI NEWS 

B. Olive Cole 

UIMNI HOLD TENTH ANNUAL FROLIC 

The Tenth Annual Frolic of the 
Alumni Association of the School of 
Pharmacy was held at the Straus Audi- 
torium. Park Heights and Slade Ave- 
nues. Baltimore, on November 6. Per- 
sons attending included students, their 
parents and friends, faculty members, 
fraternities, sorority and alumni, num- 
bering more than 600 — a happy and 
friendly group. 

The entertainment consisted of eight 
! competitive skits by the fraternities, 
.sorority and also by individuals and 
.groups. Dr. Frank J. Slama and Mr. 
Philip J. Levine, members of the Enter- 
tainment Committee, and teachers in 
the School of Pharmacy, supervised the 
presentation of the skits. 

President Samuel Portney welcomed 

the guests and awarded the prizes. 

Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr., as General 

Chairman, assisted by Solomon Weiner, 

(Continued on next page) 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 




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they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 

Wm. SCHLUDERBERG — T. J. KURDLE CO. 



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51 



CARLEA 

7 be House of 
BRAND NAME 

Sanitation Chemicals 

AM) 
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GENERAL 

— Electric — Floor 

Scrubbing & Polishing Machines 

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MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



u.is Master ol Ceremonies. 

I he following captured the prizes, 
with the resounding applause of the 
students and their triends: 

Phi Delta Fraternity- first cash prize 
and the Bernard C herrs Cup for one 
yeai ; 

Phi Alpha Fratermlv second cash 
prize; 

Newman Club — third cash prize. 

I he Belladonnaires (Vocal and Or- 
chestra) the first cash prize tor special 
presentation. 

Bernard Cherry presented the Cherry 
Cup to a representati\e o\ the Phi 
Delta Chi Fraternitv 

Dean Noel E. Foss thanked the 
Alumni Association for providing the 
Frolic for the enjo\ment of the stu- 
dents and their friends. 

The judges selecting the prize winners 
were Past Presidents of the Alumni 
Association, Mr. H. Nelson Warfield, 
Mr. Gordon A. Mouat. Mr. Francis A. 
Balassone. 

Music for dancing was furnished by 
The Men of Note Orchestra. 

Refreshments were served by the 
Place and Arrangements Committee. 
Sam A. Goldstein. Chairman. The 
refreshments are always popular with 
the students and their friends. Ice 
cream was provided by the Meadow 
Gold Company, and cookies by the 
Austin Packing Company. Coca Cola. 
hot dogs and doughnuts were also 
served. 

Door prizes were provided by the 
H. B. Gilpin Company. Muth Brothers 
and the Loewy Drug Company for 
those holding the lucky numbers. 

The following members of the 
Alumni Association with the registra- 
tion of guests as they entered the hall. 
and with the distribution of gifts: Mor- 
ris L. Cooper. Irvin Cohen. Solomon 
Weiner. George Stiffman. James P. 
Cragg. Jr.. Morris Rockman and others. 

The Valentine Dance of the Alumni 
Association is scheduled for February 
12. at the Emerson Hotel. Milton A. 
Friedman as Chairman and George 
Stiffman, Co-Chairman, are planning 
for the solicitation of advertisements 
and articles for the Souvenir Program 
of Februar\ 12. 

SCHOI IRSH1PS \W AJUDED 

The Student Aid and Scholarship Com- 
mittee of the Alumni Association oi 
the School of Pharmacy has been 
functioning for three >ears and proc- 
essed 20 applications for scholarships, 
selecting the following freshmen to re- 
cede the scholarships for 1958-59: 




L Jtoto Lti 



,Tr 



fUjravitMU 



or JLroarams 



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52 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



I ouis Gubinskj from ( it) College 

Sydney H. Hamel from Forest Park 

High School 

Robert Kantorski from Mount St. 

Foseph High School 

Barry Losinsk) from Forest Park 

High School 

Walter P. Mackaj from Beall High 
School. Cumberland 

Sol Roscnstcin from City College 

Elizabeth Schmidt from Notre Dame 

Gordon Stevenson from Valley High 
School. Lonaconing. 

The scholarships provide tuition, 
books, etc. and are sponsored — one by 
the Alumni Association, one by the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
and six by Read's Drug Stores' Founda- 
tion. A second scholarship was pro- 
vided by the Alumni Association, 
which will be held over for next year, 
as it was not accepted by the student 
selected. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel I. Raichlen 
entertained the group in their home 
following the registration of the stu- 
dents in the School of Pharmacy. Sev- 
eral members of the Scholarship Com- 
mittee were present and joined the 
Chairman in impressing the recipients 
of the scholarships with the necessity 
of maintaining high scholastic records 
during the sessions. 

As has been done for several years, 
the Alumni Association provided $400 
for scholarships, to be used in obtain- 
ing matching funds from the American 
Foundation for Pharmaceutical Educa- 
tion for the session of 1958-59. Two 
sophomores were awarded Alumni 
.Association School of Pharmacy schol- 
arships of $100 each for the first 
semester 1958-59. 

The members of the Student Aid 
and Scholarship Committee are: Sam- 
uel I. Raichlen. Chairman, Francis S. 

■Balassone. Joseph Cohen. B. Olive Cole. 

i 

.Gordon Mouat, with Norman J. Levin 
|and Maurice Lindenbaum as alternate 
members. 



PHARMACISTS. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

CONTRIBUTE TO GREATER UNIVERSITY 

OF MARYLAND FUND 

The pharmacists of Maryland and their 
friends under the sponsorship of the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, 
the Women's Auxiliary of the Associa- 
tion, the Baltimore Metropolitan Asso- 
ciation and the Alumni Association of 
the School of Pharmacy are sending 
subscriptions and pledges to the Greater 
University of Maryland Fund, desig- 
(Continued on next page) 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



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( \KI I KS IS I'll \KM \( v: 
Rl ( Kl I I Ml \ I ( OMMII III Kl PORT 

Report of the Recruitment Committee 
Ol the Alumni Association of the 
School of PhaimaC) indicates two 

years of progress. 

On September 25, 1956. President 
Norman J. Levin appointed the follow- 
ing to be known as the Recruitment 

Committee: H. Nelson Warfield, Chair- 
man. Victor H. Morgenroth. Jr.. Gor- 
don A. Mouat. Alexander J. Ogrinz. 
Jr.. Samuel I. Raichlen. with Dean 
Noel E. Foss, Ex-Officio. 

This committee, in cooperation with 
the Dean and Faculty of the School of 
Pharmacy, has since been contacting 
guidance counselors of high schools 
in Baltimore, as well as in the counties 
of Maryland, supplying literature and 
posters regarding the opportunities in 
Pharmacy and arranging for group 
meetings of interested students at their 
own respective high schools. A num- 
ber of junior high schools were also 
visited. 

The purpose — to encourage more 
high school students to consider phar- 
macy as a career and endeavor thus to 
create a pool of applicants sufficient 
in numbers to enable the University 
to select more of the better qualified 
students for each succeeding year's 
class in pharmacy. 

The committee first arranged with 
Dean Foss to purchase two sound and 
color films which had been prepared 
especially for the recruitment of stu- 
dents in pharmacy and had just been 
released. These films were prepared 
under the direction of the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 
and proved to be of great value. The 
titles: "lime for Tomorrow" and "De- 
sign for Life" — showing time — 20 
minutes each. 

After previewing these films. "Time 
for Tomorrow '" w as selected as the 
more appropriate one for high school 
use, as it presents a typical freshman 
class in pharmac) being oriented and 
high-spotted through a 4-year college 
pharmacy program to graduation. Pros- 
pect i\e students may thus see how a 
pharmacy student spends his time in 
laboratory classroom and after hours. 
Scenes have been taken in colleges of 
pharmacy from Maine to California 
and are woven into a most interesting 




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54 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINS 



and absorbing storj which points out 
the man) excellent opportunities loi 
success in the field ol pharmacy. 

"Design lor Life" was determined 
best tor showing to service clubs, and 
has been presented at various lions. 
Kiwanis, Women's Clubs, and other 

civic meetings wherever possible. 

The committee uses a somewhat 
flexible program, depending upon the 
wishes ot the high school counselor or 
principal, but has been most successful 
with the one which makes use of the 
film. A team of pharmacists consisting 
of a member of the faculty of the 
School of Pharmacy, a local pharmacist 
and a member of the Recruitment Com- 
mittee make the presentation. In gen- 
eral the sixtj minute program consists 
of the following: 

1. Introduction of visitors by coun- 
selor. 

2. Introductory remarks by chairman 
of committee. 

3. Showing of Film — "Time for To- 
morrow." 

4. Remarks by Faculty member, con- 
sisting of: 

a. Facets of Pharmacy in which 
there are excellent opportuni- 
ties aside from retail, hospital 
and detailing. 

b. Information on student enroll- 
ment in Pharmacy. 

c. Apprenticeship — 4 months after 
graduation. 

d. Licensure — Reciprocation. 

e. Freshman scholarships — Scholar- 
ships for first year. 

5. Opportunities in Retail Pharmacy — 
Hospital and Detailing. 

6. Followed by questions and answers 
and Distribution of Literature. 

Many outstanding Pharmacy Alumni 
; have participated with the visiting 
group of the committee at various 
times, including 

Charles S. Austin, Towson (now 

deceased) 
Frank Block, Curtis Bay, Md. 
Wayne A. Braden, Silver Spring 
William A. Cooley. Cumberland, Md. 
Milton J. Fitzsimmons. Ellicott City 
Harold M. Goldfeder, Riverdale 
Howard A. Gordy, Salisbury 
Arthur C. Harbaugh, Hagerstown 
Morris Lindenbaum, Reisterstown 
Victor G. Mercer, Frederick 
Lyndon B. Myers, Mt. Airy, Md. 
Alvin Rosenthal, Baltimore 
George M. Schmidt, Elkton 
James B. Truitt, Federalsburg, Md. 
(Continued on next page) 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



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Presentation ol the program has been 
made in more than 40 high schools and 
5 junior high schools, as well as several 
civic clubs. A catalog ol the Uni- 
versity's School of Pharmacy and spe- 
cially prepared literature are given to 
each student. More than 4000 students 
in Maryland have been made aware 
ol the excellent career and splendid 
opportunities which Pharmacy oilers. 
I he committee is planning a full pro- 
gram tor recruiting students lor 1 959- 
60. 

A slight increase in enrollment fol- 
lowed the work of the committee the 
first year, and at the end of the second 
year, practically a full enrollment of 
new students occurred. 

LAMBDA KAPl'A SIGMA SORORITY, 
INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION 

The 15th biennial convention of the 
Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority, Inter- 
national, was held in Seattle. Washing- 
ton in July 1958. Convention activities 
ranged from the adoption of a new 
scholarship program to a salmon bar- 
becue. 

Some 125 members from 33 chapters 
throughout the United States and 
British Columbia attended the meeting, 
with Chi Alumnae and Collegiate Chap- 
ters as Hostesses. Mrs. James R. Palmer 
was Convention Chairman. Miss 
Amelia C. DeDominicis. Mrs. Emma 
L. Frey and Eugenia Marshall of 
Baltimore represented the Graduate and 
Collegiate Chapters of Epsilon at the 
convention. 

New officers included: Mrs. William 
(Julia) Pishalski. Grosse Point Farms. 
Michigan, Grand President: Ethel Herd- 
licka. Chicago. Grand Treasurer: 
Amelia C. DeDominicis. Baltimore, 
(irand Editor. 

The pharmacy sorority approved a 
stepped-up recruiting program to inter- 
est more qualified women in the pro- 
fession. 

Another part of the recruiting pro- 
gram will be the activation of scholar- 
ships endowed by the sorority. Most 
of the 33 chapters now have scholar- 
ship funds for their home colleges and 
universities. The international sorority 
fund will finance scholarships for from 
one to five young women each year 
at the senior or graduate student level. 

Special events of the convention, first 
to be held in Seattle, included the 
salmon bake at Agate Pass and a water 
tour: a Seattle Seafair luncheon, a tour 
of the citj and a reception at the Uni- 
versit) ol Washington College of 
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56 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



College of 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
RECREATION and 
HEALTH 

/)/. Lester M. Fraley 



DR. MOHR u H\l IN PROFESSIONA1 

AC I 1\I I II S 

Dr. Dorothy R. Mohr has been ap- 
pointed by the Research Council of the 
American Association of Health. 
Physical Education and Recreation as 
Research Editor of the Research 
Bulletin Column in the Journal of 
H.P.E. & R. Dr. Mohr also has been 
named as the Universitj of Maryland 
representative, serving a two-year term, 
on the Advisory Board of the Mental 
Health Study Center, a field station of 
the Community Services Branch of the 
National Institute of Mental Health. 

THREE FACULTY MEMBERS ATTEND 
CONFERENCE 

Members of the faculty of the Depart- 
ment of Physical Education for Women 
who attended the annual fall conference 
of the Eastern Association for Physical 
Education of College Women held at 
Swampscott. Massachusetts, Oct. 24-26, 
were Dr. Dorothy F. Deach. Dr. 
Dorothy R. Mohr. Miss Dorothy Ham- 
berg, Miss Louise Howarth, and Miss 
Josephine Gaines. Dr. Deach, as Vice- 
President of the Association, was Con- 
ference Chairman; Dr. Mohr is Editor 
of the Conference Report. Miss Gaines 
served as a member of the International 
Relations Committee. 

FACULTY NEWS 

Dr. Josephine Hubbell is Chairman of 
the College Health Section of the 
Eastern District Conference of the 
AAHPER 1958-59. She also is a mem- 
ber of the College Health Committee of 
AAHPER for 1958-59. 

The June-July issue of Religious Edu- 
cation published the summary and 
abstract of Dr. Hubbell's doctoral dis- 

isertation "A Philosophical Analysis of 
the Spiritual and Moral Values in 
Camping." 

Dr. Gladys E. Wadsworth attended 
the annual meeting of the Council of 
Physical Therapy School Directors in 
Bandera, Texas, November 17 through 
November 19, 1958. The program was 
devoted to group discussion of "Trends 

jin Higher Education and Trends in 
Professional Accreditation." Guest 

ispeakers included Dr. William Weisen- 

bach, Associate Dean of the College of 

(Continued on next page) 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 




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Macken/ s North 

Central Association oi Colleges and 
S Schools, C hicago, Illinci--. 

1 V( I IV I I II s 

Miss Dorothy Madden and Miss Mar> 
Harrington of the dance faculty an- 
nounce the following activities in which 
the Dance Department is involved. 

Mr. Louis Horst. musician, composer, 
dance critic, teacher. Editor of the 
Dance Observer addressed the Pro- 
fessional Club on Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 2. at eleven o'clock in the morn- 
ing. Mr. Horst also observed and 
criticized the dances of the members 
of the Advanced Dance Group on Tues- 
day evening. 

The Advanced Dance Group plan- 
ned a week of demonstrations begin- 
ning on December 3. The demonstra- 
tions include techniques to train the 
dancer, and studies which show ap- 
proaches to choreography. One or two 
complete dances were shown. The group 
performed for the Orientation Ac- 
tivities classes at the University on 
December 3. for Western Junior High 
School on December 4 and for Salis- 
burj State Teacher's College on Decem- 
ber 9. 

The Modern Dance Council of 
Washington. D. C. in cooperation with 
the Departments of Physical Education 
tor Women of the University of Mary- 
land. Howard University and the George 
Washington University presented a 
Symposium in Dance, lmprovization 
and Composition with Lucas Hoving. 
member oi the Jose I.imon Company 
and oi the faculty of the Connecticut 
College School of Dance, on Saturday, 
December 6. 1958. at Preinkert Field 
House. University of Maryland 
Campus. College Park. Maryland. 

WEIGHT 111 UNO BECOMING POPULAR 

I he sport of competitive weight lifting 
seems to be enjoying a new-found 
popularity in our country today. The 
activit) ol vv eight training for all ages 
and both sexes likewise is becoming 
increasingly popular. 

At the University of Maryland, the 
OKmpic Barbell Club is in its second 
year of competition on an informal club 
basis. One of the club's major objec- 
tives is to further the activity bv giving 
demonstrations to schools, clubs, and 
other interested groups. For further in- 
formation contact H. W. Freeman, 
club advisor: College of Physical Edu- 
cation. Campus; College Park. Mary- 
land. 



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58 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



College of 

SPECIAL AND 

CONTINUATION 

STUDIES 



< ! [Hen Sager 



HOI I \K HI COMES COl ONI I 

Marine Colonel Frank E. Hollar, '57, 
eurrently serving as executive officer of 
Marine Aircraft Group- 13, recently re- 
ceived the silver eagles of his new rank 
during ceremonies in the office of the 
Commanding General, 1st Marine 
Brigade. Brigadier General A. R. Kier 
and Mrs. Rosemary S. Hollar pinned 
on the rank insignia during the 
ceremony. Col. Hollar has twice won 
the Distinguished Flying Cross. 

BURKHARDT NEW EUROPEAN 
LANGUAGE SUPERVISOR 

Mr. Klaus Burkhardt, a former instruc- 
tor in the Georgetown University School 
of Foreign Service, has been appointed 
Supervisor of Language courses for the 
University of Maryland European Divi- 
sion. 

Mr. Burkhardt succeeds Mr. Thad- 
deus C. Lockard. Jr., who recently be- 
came an Assistant Professor of Modern 
Languages at the University of the 
South. 

A graduate of Georgetown's Institute 
of Languages and Linguistics, the new 
language supervisor later taught Ger- 
man to special USAF students for 
three years. 

He was born in Berlin, Germany. 
During World War II, although em- 
ployed as a buyer in a Nazi ammuni- 
tions factory, he remained a strong 
anti-Nazi. His family was the object of 
{Continued on next page) 



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59 



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political persecution b\ the Nazis until 
their downfall. 

From 1945 to 1946, Mr. Burkhardt 
terved as an interpreter, investigator 
and instructor for United States armed 
forces in Europe. He emigrated from 
German) to this country in 1946. and 
while Stateside, held various positions in 
large hotels in Washington. DC", and 
New York C its 

1957-58 OVERSEAS u ADl MM YEAR «^ 

ONI <»l l MH ! KM INS BEST 

Ibta] course enrollments in the Lni- 
\ersit\ of Maryland's off-campus and 

overseas programs during the academic 
year 1957-58 practically equalled those 
Of 1956-57 in spite of international 
crises. militar\ budget and manpower 
cuts, and troop withdrawals from 
certain overseas areas. 

During 1956-57. the peak year for 
the off-campus stateside and overseas 
programs, a grand total of 68.874 
course enrollments were recorded. In 
1957-58. the total amounted to 68.080. 

Although total program enrollments 
remained essentially the same for the 
two academic \ears. there were marked 
changes within the area programs. For 
example. European course enrollments 
dropped from 37.962 in 1956-57 to 
31.680 in 1957-58, a loss of 17 per- 
cent. 

On the other hand, total course en- 
rollments in the Far East Division rose 
to 15.237 in 1957-58. an increase of 43 
percent over the total of 10.652 for 
1956-57. This increase was both logical 
and expected since it was onl\ Marx- 
land's second year in the Far East. 

Atlantic Division enrollments in- 
creased 14 percent over the previous 
year, rising to 3.074 in 1957-58 com- 
pared with 2.690 in 1956-57. Enroll- 
ments in the stateside off-campus pro- 
gram rose slightly with a total of 
18.089 in 1957-58 compared with 
17.570 for 1956-57. 

WIGHT HOI DS ENVIABLE RECORD 
OF SCHOLASTIC ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Captain William D. Wight. USAF, a 
1954 graduate o\ the L'ni\ersit\ of 
Maryland, was awarded the Masters 
Degree in Business Administration with 
honors in August [958. At the same 
time, he was also elected to Sigma lota 
Epsilon. National bonorarj and profes- 
sional fraternity for men and women 
studying professional business manage- 
ment, and to Beta Gamma Sigma. Na- 
tional honorary business fraternity. 

But scholastic honors are nothing 
new to Captain Wight. He held the 
highest scholastic average (3.72 out ot 



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60 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



4.00) of the European Division Class 

of l l >54 with which he graduated. ( ap 
tain Wight was the second person to 

complete an entire college education in 
the overseas program. He started with a 
high school diploma m 1950 and ac- 
cumulated 30 University ol Maryland 
courses overseas in addition to the den 
eral Education Development lest. 

In the Fall of l l >57. Captain Wight 
was sent to Indiana l'm\ersit\ under the 
Air Force Institute of Technology pro- 
gram. At Indiana University his grade 
point average was 2.84 out of a possible 
3.00. receiving 10 As and 2 B's. 

Now stationed in the Washington. 
DC., area. Captain Wight was admitted 
to the Graduate School of the Univer- 
sitj ol Maryland last October. His sights 
are set on a Ph.D. in Economics and 
Business Organization and Administra- 
tion. 

Captain Wight enlisted as a private 
in the Army Air Force in 1942, became 
a Master Sergeant by 1945, and was 
commissioned in 1950. 



SOCIAL NOTES 



MARRIAGES, NURSING ALUMNI 

June M. Montgomery, '55, to Mr. 
Bruce Dillard Dunseth, on March 29, 
1955. 

Betty Sue Marshall. '58. to Mr. Ira 
Dale Good, on September 13, 1958. 

Mildred F. Bing, '58, to Mr. Mark 

A. Levine in August, 1958. 

Joan G. Gosnell, '58, to Mr. Charles 

B. Hubbert. on September 20, 1958. 
Josephine E. Nocke, '56, to Dr. B. 

A. Gillen on October 5, 1958. 

Nancy Ruth Skadding, '56, to Mr. 
John Lee Hogan. on August 2, 1958. 

Sylvia Ann Kelly, '58, to Mr. Stanley 
Young Bennett, on August 23, 1958. 

Ruth Jeanette Lambert. '58, to Mr. 
Julian Basil Stevens, Jr., on August 30, 
1958. 

Norma J. Fiery, '58, to Mr. Charles 
Pearce Smith. Jr.. on August 23, 1958. 

Lucy Gray Winslow, '52, to Mr. 
Alexander George Bednekoff on Sep- 
tember 5. 1958, in Seattle, Washington. 

Joan L. Peltier, '58. to Mr. Henry 
Lyons, on September 6, 1958. 

Mary Siu Mei Wu, '57. to Lt. Daniel 
Arris, on September 6, 1958. 

Patricia Ann Warren, '58, to Mr. 
Morton Knowles Blanchard, on Sep- 
tember 21, 1958. 

(Continued on next page) 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 



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NORMAN MOTOR COMPANY, Inc. 

SALES fesfi. S) SERVICE 



8313 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



F. A. Davis & Sons 


WHOLESALERS 


Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Supplies 


Kitchen & Dining Equipment 


Soda Fountain Supplies 


119 S. HOWARD STREET 


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PURE 

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American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service 

928 EYE STREET. N.W. 

Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 8-6478 



McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

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NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO Inc. 

Link Belt Company "Pyrene" & "MSA" Industrial 

Power Transmission * CO-TWO • Gas Masks. Canisters 

Supplies Fire Extinguishers & First Aid Equipment 

2600 12th STREET. N.E. WASHINGTON 18. D. C. LAwrenee 6-1362 



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Cynthia Ann Piper, '58, to Mr. Jack 
C. Lewis on May 20, 1958. 

BIRTHS TO NURSING ALUMNI 

Mr. and Mrs. Monroe E. Fraleigh, a 
son, James Edward, (JefT) on August 
6. 1958. Mrs. Fraleigh was Dorothea 
Fenwich. '53. 

Id Dr. and Mrs. E. Burl Randolph, 
triplets, on July 15. 1958. Barbara Ann. 
Rebecca Susan, and David Kirk. Mrs. 
Randolph was Mary Kirk. '45. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Barlow, a 
daughter. Roberta, on June 15. 1958. 

Dr. and Mrs Henry A. Baer. a 
daughter. Brenda Margaret, on July 
18, 1958. Mrs. Baer was Carolyn 
Elizabeth Myers. "53. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John E. Yingling 
Jr.. a son. John E. 111. on May 9th. 
1958. Mrs. Yingling was Nancy Ann 
Shrop. "56. 

Dr. and Mrs. Herbert K. Spccrs. a 
daughter. Nancy Lynn, on September 
27. 1958. Mrs. Speers was Katherine 
Swint. '54. 

Captain and Mrs. Dean Gale Waters, 
a daughter. Deane Gayle. on October 
10. 1958. Mrs. Waters was Gwendolyn 
Elaine Robertson. '54. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon T. Dunbar, a 
son. Thomas Scott, on August 28, 
1958. Mrs. Dunbar was Miriam Louise 
Croft. '52. 

Dr. and Mrs. James Laster. a girl, 
Jamie Elizabeth. October. 1950. Mrs. 
Laster was Betsv Smith. '58. 



BIRTHS 

To Mr. and Mrs. Jules P. Sussman of 
Lexington. Massachusetts, a second 
child, first daughter. Judith Elaine. She 
arrived October 27. 1958. at Beth Israel 
Hospital. Boston. Massachusetts. Mr. 
Sussman was a member of the 1956 
class in Electrical Engineering 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 



DR. Al HI Rl C AR1 USKIN 

Dr. Albert Carl Eskin. D.D.S. '31. died 
June 25 oi a cerebral hemorrhage. He 
was 50 years old. 

During his student days. Dr. Eskin 
was Vice President of his class and 
Editor ot the yearbook, The Vanguard. 
He was a member of SED. the dental 
fraternity. 



62 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Practicing in Cumberland, Maryland 
for the p. ist ten years, Dr. Eskin was, 
at the time of tus death, President of 
the Mlegany-Garrett Count) Dental 
Association. 

Dr. Eskin is the author, together with 
Dr. J. Ben Robinson, of a hook on 
dental histois 

He is survived by his wife, and one 
son. George C. Eskin. presently a 
junior at UCLA. 



K. Ill SIMM w 

K. lee Sellman. Ag. ' 1 1 >. died Septem- 
ber 28, 1958, at his home in College 
Heights Estates, Hyattsville, Maryland. 
Mr. Sellman was awarded the lames 
Goddard Memorial Medal of General 
Merit upon his graduation from the 
University. He served as Assistant 
Agronomist at the University"s College 
of Agriculture for 16 years. At the 
time of his death he was District Man- 
ager for State Farm Insurance Com- 
panies. Bloomington. Illinois, having 
been employed by that company since 
1934. 

JOHN O. BOSLEY 

Mr. John O. Bosley. '97. passed away 
at his home in Wilmington. Delaware, 
on September 9. 1958. at the age of 
82. Mr. Bosley. for years active in 
retail pharmacy as a proprietor of a 
retail store, was a member and Secre- 
tary of the Delaware State Board of 
Pharmacy for thirty-three years, retir- 
ing from the Board October 10. 1945. 

WILLIAM B. HILL 

William B. Hill, soldier. Indian agent 
and engineer, died Sunday September 
14. 1958 at his home in St. Augustine. 
Florida. 

Born at Upper Marlboro. 58 years 
ago. Col. Hill was graduated from the 
University of Maryland with a degree 
in civil engineering. Before beginning 
his career with the Florida and East 
Coast Railroad, Col. Hill helped con- 
struct a reservation for the Apache 
Nation in Oklahoma, and served for a 
time as its agent. 

During World War II. Col. Hill 
helped build advanced bases in the 
South Pacific, and on his release from 
'•active duty returned to his job with 
the railroad. 

Col. Hill was a member of the Vet- 
erans of Foreign Wars, had served as 
fc>ast commander of the American 
Legion, belonged to the 40 & 8. the 
iAmerican Society of Civil Engineers 
and the St. Augustine Historical Society. 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1959 






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63 



Directory of Advertisers 



I| .n W ..|K« 50 

■n\ . . 55 

I s Adkins Ml 

Advertised I i'anv 52 

I 4f. 

Amctn.in Disinfectant t ompan) 61 

American Plate Glass C umpjni 54 

American relephonc a relegrapfa Compan) 
[nsidt 

An. hot 1'osi Product! (Anchoi Fence) 56 

\ I) Anderson 44 

Arnold'i \ illmge Shop 4u 

Arundel Federal Savings A loan Assn 46 

ksphail Sen ice Co., Int .46 

Atchison A Keller, In. 5x 

Alvin 1 Aubinoe Outside Ba.k Cover 



H A H I (terminators, In. 46 

Baltimore Asphalt Block A rile ( o 45 

Baltimore Business Forms 34 

Baltimore Check Room Service 47 

Baltimore Envelope Companj 45 

Bank ol Crisfield .60 

Bard-Avon School *2 

Bergmann's I aundrj 44 

Bethesda Cinder Block A Mfg. Co.. In. 54 

Bio R.mio Drug Compan) 51 

Blackie's House ol Bed 40 

Bon Ion Saratoga (hip Distributors 

Bornmann-Pattyson Opticians, In. 5u 

Harrv A, Boswell Co 54 

F S. Bowen Electrical Contractor 33 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 54 

Meal Product Co 61 

Dexter F. Br>.tn 37 

Buck Cii.iss Companj *4 

Carlea Janitor Supply Co 52 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 39* 

I). Harrv Chambers. Opticians 46 

Chaney's Garage 63 

C bestnut I arms Dairy 49 

Thomas E. Clark. Inc 62 

Cloverland I arms Dairj 30 

C'ohn A Bo. k Compan) 53 

C okesbur) Book Store 4(1 

Colson-Merriam Compan) 52 

Elizabeth Coone) Personnel Agenc) 45 

( ount) Title Compan) 61 

\ Myron Cowell, Inc 33 

trosse A Blackwell Co 

C rout. Snvdcr A C randall 47 

Crown Oil A Was Compan) 60 

Victor Cushwa A Sons jg 

Custom Musi. Sv stems 59 

DAI Steel Corp 5] 

Davidson [ransfei A Storage Co 

F. A. Davis .V Sons ft) 

D. C. Ignition Headquarters, Inc 36 

Del-Haven White House Motel 49 

J II DeVeau A Sons, Inc 63 

Dietrich A Gambrill, In. M 

Dietrich Bros. Inc 44 

Diplomat Hotel 21 

Douglas Air. rati ( o . In. '.; 
Drummond A Company, Inc 

Norm. m S I arte) A Son 43 

Easterday-Duckworth Roofing Co 4s 

Eastern Overall Compan) 52 

I dmonds Optician 5j 

I tnbass) Dair) 57 

red I ngelhardt, \rchiteci 50 



Farmers Coop era tive Aaaocn 

J II I ilhtrt. In. 

I irst 1 eder.il Saving! .v loin Aasocn 

lirst National Bank 29 

1 eland I . Fisher, In. 49 

Follin Motors 57 

I orcign Motors. I id *5 

I ralcrnitv Federal Savings A loan Assn. 44 

Frederick Underwriters, in. 4? 

Fuller A d'Albert. Inc 



Garamond Press 59 

s \ Gatti .v Son. In. 

Albert I Goct/e Pa. king C In. 

Cjra> Concrete Pipe c ompan) 37 

M. J. Grove Lime C ompan) 43 

Gusli's Restaurant 54 



Hammond Bros.. Inc 31 

Paul M Adams (The Hand) Imei 51 

Hannes Formal Wear 45 

Harrington Hotel 57 

Harve) Dairy, Inc 36 

Hendlei 's Ice C ream 46 

Hillvard Sales Co. 60 

Hinde A Dauch 31 

Hut's Electrical Service. In. 39 

Robert F. HolT 62 

The HofTberger Company 37 

Hollander's Restaurant 41 

Hotel Dupont Plaza Outside Back Cover 

The House in the Pines "-5 



The Industrial Corp 37 

Johnston. Lemon & Co 39 



The Frances Scott Key Hotel 43 

Kiducll A; Kidwell. Inc 50 

King Bros.. Priming 52 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 34 

Koontz Creamerv. Inc 47 



Lamar A. Wallace 62 

Maurice Leeser Co 5( 

lord Calvert Hotel 56 

1 ustinc-Nicholson Che\ rolel 



G. B. Macke Corp 55 

Mangels, Herold Co.. Inc 51 

Maria's Restaurant 34 

Marks Home Furnishings 

I he Martin Company 

Maryland Hotel Stippl) Co 52 

Maryland Inn 61 

Meadowgold Ice Cream Co 61 

Metropolitan Tourist Co 47 

Midstate Federal Savings ,\ | , >an Assn. ... 60 

F. O. Mitchell A Bro . In. 

Modern Machinist Co 

Modern Stationery Co 44 

Montgomery-Stubbs Motors, inc 54 

Morrison A Filer 46 

Murray -Bauingartner Co 

John J A 1 Rowland McGinit) 44 

McLeod A Komhur^ Sione Co 

M< N.ill Surveys. In. . ... 61 

National Bank ol Cambridge i; 

National Equipment A Suppl) Co .62 

Norman Motor Co 61 

Normand) I arms 56 

North Washington Press. In. 54 
Northrop Air.ratt. In. Ins .le 1 ront Covet 



O.cidcntal Restaurant 42 

Olncy Inn 



Park Transfer ( GO 

Peninsula Poultry Distributors. Inc 55 

Penn Hotel ( Bernie lees, 42 
Jimmie Porter (T'A Kicrnan'sj 

Puritan Compressed Cjas Corp. 46 



Quick v ndrv 



50 



Refrigeration Supply Co ; 2 

Restaurant 823 56 

RestorfT Motors 62 

Rex Engrav ing Co 45 

Riall Jackson Co 55 

Roma Restaurant 44 

Rose Exterminator Co 



Safeway Irailwavs 

Salisbury Milling Co 

Salisbury Rug Co 41 

\ an Rensselaer P. Sa\e 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co 51 

Seidensplnner. Realtor 

The Shade Shop 

Sliver Hill Sand A Gravel Co «■ 

Russell W. Smith. Insurance 51 

Smith's Book Store 

Southeastern Floor Co 63 

Southeast Title Corp 50 

Southern Oxygen Co 57 

Southern Plate Glass Co 59 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 

Standard Duplicating Co 50 

Stanlej Coal Co 

Star Baking Co 

Wm. P. Stein. Inc 42 

Sterling Process. Bookbinders 

St rayer College 

Student's Supply Store 48 

Suburban Trust Co 36 

Mano Swartz 41 

Sweetheart Bakers 



Taylor House Restaurant 40 

Thomas & Thompson Co 62 

Thompson Furniture Co 58 

Thomsso.i Steel Co 

Wm. J. Tickner A Sons. Inc. 60 

Town Hall Tavern 



Universal Electro Plating Co. A 

James T. \ ernav A Sons Co 48 



Wallop A Son. Insurance 63 

Walton A Madden 

Washington Coca Cola Bottling Works . ... 39 
Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange. In. 56 

J. I. Wells Co.. Inc 60 

Wes tch ester Dining Room 62 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 

White Rice Inn 

Wholesale Radio Parts Co.. In. 

W ilkins Coffee Co 

Perry O. Wilkinson 

.1 M.Kennv Willis 

E. Randolph Wootton A Co 

W orchester Fertilizer Co 53 

Wye Plantation 60 



■\ enching Palace 



41 



64 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



What Will Tomorrow's 
Telephones Be Like? 



J_his country is going to be needing 
a lot more communication service 
in the years ahead. Matter of fact, 
the need is with us right now. 

Just the great increase in popula- 
tion (there will be 40.(1(10.000 more 
people in the V. S. bv 1970) means 
that we'll be stepping right along to 
keep ahead of our customers' needs. 

The greatest progress will come, 
as it always has, from the Bell Sys- 
tem's unique concept of unified re- 
search, manufacturing and operation 
that has given this country the best 
telephone service in the world. 

A vital part of this concept is al- 
ways to look ahead and not back. 
Many new things are already at hand 
or in sight. 

New instruments will provide an 
ever-widening choice for our cus- 
tomers. Improvements in trans- 
mission and the development of 
electronic switching will make our 
services faster and more versatile. 

There are some tremendous possi- 
bilities in the use of telephone facili- 
ties for enabling business machines 




PICTURE OF TOMORROW. Will tomorrow's telephones be smnller and lighter and specially 
designed for each room? Will the dial, mouthpiece and receiver all be in the unit you hold 
in your hand? Will you be able to get your party just by pushing buttons, instead of dialing? 
We're working on many types and testing them at Bell Laboratories and in homes and offices. 



to communicate with each other — 
no matter how many miles apart. 
Great volumes of data of all kinds 
can be transmitted automatically 
over telephone lines at high speed. 

We also have the prospect of pro- 
viding picture channels for many 
purposes, in addition to the present 
networks for television broadcasting. 

How far wc so, and what we arc 



able to do. depends on money . To 
make the best progress and apply it 
to the greatest advantage of every- 
body, the Bell Telephone Companies 
must be in good shape financially. 

In all lines of business it is the 
companies whose earnings arc good 
that are able to make the best prod- 
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LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



Volume XXX • Number 3 
March-April • 1959 



the 



Maryland 



magazine 



Alumni Publication of the 



University of Maryland 







In This Issue: Spring Reunion Announcement 

Tradition and Progress — an Alumni View 

Nursing's New Facility is Dedicated 

Tom Nugent Arrives with Plans to Conquer 



Speaking of Progress — 




Progress speaks for itself. 
57,000 members can't be wrong! 




The new site for savers — 
Dividends compounded and paid quarterly. 



1M 



RST 




1)1 I{\l 

IlvY^ASHI^GTCKV 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN 
ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 

Bethesda Branch: 8216 Wisconsin Avenue 

OL. 6-3923 

— Home Office — 

610 1 3th Street, N.W. Washington 5, D. C. 

Dl. 7-2370 



Maryland 




COVER 

\in //.lie/ Football Coach Tom Sugenl arrives on tht ( ollegt Park scene 
Nugent, a young man confident in the ability o) Maryland i<> play an ag 
sire and winning season. i\ the subject oi an article beginning <>n page 19 

PHOTOGRAPH BY M DANEGGER. Ill \l). PHOTOGRAPHK LABORATORY 



the 



Maryland 



Volume XXX 



magazine 

Number 3 



MARCH APRIL- 1959 



<\lumni Publication of 

:he University of Maryland 

30ARD OF REGENTS 

DHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice Chairman 

3. HERBERT BROWN. Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 

^OUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

IDMUND S. BURKE. Assistant Treasurer 

M.VIN L. AUBINOE 

'HOMAS W. PANGBORN 

kNOS S. STOCKBRIDGE 

,"HOMAS B. SYMONS 




OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 




FRANK BLOCK, '24, President 
HARRY A. BOSWELL, JR., '42, Vice-President 
DR. WILSON H. ELKINS MRS. GERALDINE P. EDWARDS, '31, Vice-President 
President of the University DAVlD L BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 




VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 
OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 




ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 




ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 




JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer SALLY L OGDEN 




18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 
OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESJ Baltimore 18. Md. Washinaton. D. C. 




; EWING TUTTLE 




C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director (HO 7-9018) (FE 7-2113) 




In This Issue — 


FEATURES 








2 


Alumni Diary 






3 


Spring Reunion Announcement 






4 


Alumni and Campus Notes 






8 


Tradition and Progress — an Alumni View 






11 
14 


Whitehurst Hall Dedicated as Nursing's New Facility 
News from the Clubs 






15 


Your Alumni Association Officers 






17 


Fund Headed toward Second Successful Year 






18 


Millikan's Men Finish Strong 






19 


Tom Nugent Comes to College Park, Estimates the Situation — and 




NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND 


COLLEGES 


Plans to Conquer 






25 


Agriculture 






28 


Arts and Sciences 






30 


Air Science 






31 


Business and Public Administration 






32 
36 


Dentistry 
Education 






41 


Engineering 






43 


Home Economics 






47 


Law 






47 


Medicine 






50 


Nursing 






51 

52 


Pharmacy 

Physical Education, Recreation and Health 






55 


University College 






59 


Social Notes 






61 


Completed Careers 






64 


Directory of Advertisers 








Published Bi-Monthly at the University of; Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md., as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879, $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Member of American Alumni Council. 



I III (il M KM Al I MM COUNCIL 

S( llool \\l> ( 01 I I (.1 
Kl IK I s/ \ / I//I / s 

tOIII I I 11 Kl 

Milan B Hamilton, 79 
( la) ton Re\ uolds, '22 
rheodore L. Bissell, 70 

IITS& SCIENCES 

w Gilbert Dent,, Jr., 76 
K..lph Ci Shure, "32 
( harles K Merrick, 76 

m I s i s, i s •, A PUB Lit tDMINISTBATION 

Harrj \ Boswell, Jr., '42 
\h in S. Klein, '37 
I gbert 1 -. I ingley, '27 

III MIM«I 

Di Samuel Bryant, '32 
l)r I ugene I). 1 von. '38 
Dr. Edwin G. Gail, IK 

I V I I .. s 

Mis. John J. Hovert, Jr.. '50 

Judson Bell, '41 

1 1. ii i\ Hasslinger, '33 

I SUM I H I S I, 

I mmetl I oane, '29 
Robert M. Rivello, '43 
\nhur G. VanReuth, '34 

BOMI ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Miriam Beall. 3 1 

Mrs. Geraldine P. Edwards, '31 
Mrs. Agnes McNutt-Kricker, '31 

(.. Kenneth Reiblich, 79 
Benjamin B. Rosenstock, 75 
I ayman J. Redden, '34 

Ml DM i s i 

Dr. Thursion K. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, 70 
Dr. William H. I riplett, '11 

NURSING 

Mrs. Evelyn Koontz Musavi. '53 
Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, '50 
Mrs. Norma Fuller Yeager, '48 

PHARMACY 

Frank Block, 74 
Norman J. Levin, '38 
Gordon Mouat, '37 



ALUM \ I ciub REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore— Charles P. Ellinger, '37 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cumberland — H. Reford Aldridge, 75 
I astern Shore — Otis Twilley, 71 
Frederick County — 

James F. Zimmerman. '37 
"M" Club— George Knepley, '39 
New England -George Kerlejza, 75 
New York — Harold McGay, '50 
Overseas Col. Edward J. Fletcher, '37 
Pittsburgh Dr. Joseph Finegold, '34 
Prince Georges Thomas R. Brooks, '36 
Richmond Paul Mullinix, "36 
Schenectady- Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin James W. Stevens. 19 
i S Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Ivans. '26 



I \ oi I l< 10 VI MBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President o/ the ( 'niversity 
David I . Brigham, '38 

Si i retary-1 reasurer 
Joseph il Deckman, '31. Past President 
J Gilbert Prendergast, '33. Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, '18. Past President 
( ol. () H Saunders. '10. Past President 
Dr. Vlbert I Goldstein, '12 

Past I'rt \ul, nt 
T. T. Speer. '17. Past President 
C. V. Koons, 79, Past President 
Di \rihur I. Bell, '19, Past Pn rident 




THE ALUMNI DIARY 



1)1 \1< I I I 1 OVV U I MM 

Remember the date May 9. 1959 — We'll come back to this important date in a 
moment for it involves every alumnus. Let's first ask the question. "How far are 
you from the University ol Maryland campus'" A rule of thumb in alumni circles 
is that. "The further an alumnus is from his school, the closer he is to it." This 
sounds like double talk but in actual terms the interest level of the average alumnus 
increases with the geographical distance from his campus and from the standpoint 
of the number of years which he has been out of school. 

It is verv logical that the alumnus who cannot frequently visit the campus 
attempts to keep his contact with the University through the alumni publication 
and through correspondence much as a person who is separated from his family 
for any length of time. News from the old home town becomes increasing!) 
valuable. The young alumnus has the usual problems related to the establishment 
of a family, a home, and a business or occupation. Only as he begins to have a 
few moments to call his own can he again focus his attention upon the institution 
which gave him a big assist toward his present station in life. 

Population growth at the University has brought a great swelling of the alumni 
ranks. Dividends will soon be returned as these younger alumni develop the 
delayed interest which is so much the normal course of the average alumnus. 
Many older alumni who have carried the organizational and development burden 
through a number of years, will welcome the cultivation of new enthusiasm as 
younger alumni come of age". Much has been done but there are greater fields 
of achievement yet unexplored. 

The prospects are far from discouraging. Alumni rolls are increasing at the 
rate of some 2500 graduates per year. The successes of each will be the yardstick 
by which the Universitj of Maryland is to be measured in the next two or three 
decades. 

All of this points to the continuing need for a strong, virile, and progressive 
Alumni Association. It cannot be done with a handful nor with lukewarm devo- 
tion. Individual alumni groups, through club and school association activities, 
will be demonstrating their deep interest during the next two or three months. 
Annual affairs are the order of the day for the Dental. Law. Medical. Nursing 
and Pharmacy Schools. Other specific interest categories will find expression in 
a "gathering of the clan." 

On a broader basis we come again to the date of May 9th. 1959. The annual 
Spring Reunions will be held at College Park with the feature attraction being 
the Alumni-Varsity football game. Emphasis will be placed on class reunions for 
the five year classes 1909 through 1954. School business meetings will be held. 
Army will be played in Lacrosse, and a chicken barbeque luncheon will be 
repeated. Open house will be provided by the School of Engineering as it cele- 
brates the 100th anniversary of its founding. 

All in all. May 9th will be a great dav for the entire familv to visit the campus. 
The alumnus can point to the old days, the University can point to the progress 
which has been made over the years, and the youngster who mav soon be the 
prospective student, can receive a first hand picture of the campus about which 
Mother and Dad have boasted for so many years. 

As ever. 




fav< 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



_*-,fff m ffft fff. fff. fff. t "- '".'"-'".'"-?,"-'"- tff»Cffmfffmfffmff f t f ff * fffn fff. fff, fff. fff_ fffm fff* fff* ( 

'J 

: ? 

I Alumni Reunions Scheduled 

£ for May 9 

FOOTBALL, CLASS REUNIONS AND ENGINEERING 
ANNIVERSARY TO BE FEATURED 



A lumni Day is set for May 9; the annual Alumni-Varsity Football 
*~^ Game and Class Reunions will be the central attractions to the 
returning men and women of Maryland. 

The College of Engineering will celebrate its One-hundredth Anni- 
versary and will begin the day's activities with an open house, 10 a.m. 
through 1 2 Noon. 

School business meetings for alumni have been scheduled. Arts 
and Sciences, Business and Public Administration, Agriculture and 
Education — 11 a.m.. the Student Union; Home Economics — 10 a.m., 
Margaret Brent Hall; Engineering — 11 a.m., Engineering Classroom 
Building. 

Alumni and their guests will participate in a chicken 
barbeque luncheon at the Student Union, served from 
1 1:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Army and Maryland will tangle in lacrosse at 12 Noon 
in Byrd Stadium. 

The alumni-varsity football game will bring to- 
gether a star-studded squad of former Terrapin greats 
against the 1959 hopefuls of new Head Coach Tom 
Nugent. Kickoff is slated for 2:30 p.m. at Byrd Stadi- 
um; a special section will be reserved for alumni. 

Following the football game, will be an Alumni Coffee Hour at 
the Student Union. Interspersed in the day's activities will be class 
reunions for the special five-year groups who have expressed an inter- 
est in once again coming together. 

A more complete description of all events will be mailed to all 
College Park alumni shortly. 



^RCH-APRIL. 1959 



".» 




ALUMNI AND CAMPUS NOTES 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



M \K( II 



2-Maj is Space I ducation Institute, 

sponsored b\ the Maryland Sec- 
tion . American Rocket Society 
with the cooperation of the Uni- 
versity ( ollege, the College of 
Education, and the Enoch Pratt 
I uc Library — at the Enoch Pratt 
Free Library Auditorium. 
Frederick County Alumni Meet- 
ing — Francis Scott Key Hotel, 
Frederick. 
Maryland Day. 
Easter recess begins. 
I rack — Florida Relays — Gaines- 
ville. Florida. 
Easter recess ends. 
3 1 -May 19 Business Management Insti- 
tute: a Training Program Pri- 
marily for Management Personnel 
of a Small Business Concern — 
at Symons Hall. 



19 



25 
26 
28 

31 



APRIL 

8-9 Maryland State Council Home- 
makers Spring Meeting. 

I I Track — Duke — home. 

11-12 Track — Quantico Relays — Quan- 
tico. 

18 Track — North Carolina — home. 

24-25 I rack — Penn Rcla\s — Philadel- 
phia. 

25-Maj 2 I. T. Production — Kiss Me 
Kate. 

2X Track — D.C.A.A.U. — George- 
town. 



MAY 



2 Track — Navy — There. 

8-9 Track— A. C. C. (Outdoor)— Co- 
lumbia. S. C. 

9 Alumni Sprine Reunions — College 
Park. 



13 Military Day. 

15 Dedication and Formal Opening 
of the I niversity Golf Course. 



JUNE 

4 School of Medicine Alumni Day, 
morning and afternoon sessions: 
luncheon at L'niversin Hospital; 
Banquet in the evening at the 
Lord Baltimore Hotel. 

15-19 Rural Women's Short Cour 

College Week for Women — Col- 
lege Park campus. 

22-July 13 Summer Institute for Teach- 
ers of Mathematics in Junior 
High School. 

22-July 31 Summer Program on Human 
Development. 

22-July 31 Teaching Conservation of Na- 
tural Resources — Summer School 
Workshop. College of Agriculture. 



In the University* speech an J hearing science 
program. teacher and student communicate 
through hand puppets. 




THE UNIVERSITY'S OUTSTANDING SPEECH 

AND HEARING SCIENCE PROGRAM 

MAK.ES RAPID PROGRESS 

To alumni of more than very recent 
years, one of the University's most in- 
teresting programs is virtually unknown. 

Ten years ago. in the academic year 
194S-49. a graduate program in speech 
and hearing science was established. 
Though still an "infant" by some 
standards, there are presenth 34 stu- 
dents studying at the graduate level, a 
figure which compares with u ell-known 
departments of speech in other univer- 
sities. 

["he objectives of the speech and 
hearing science program accord closely 
with the three basic purposes of the 
University: that is. the program is org- 
anized to train therapists in speech and 
hearing, to provide service to the com- 
munity, and to carry out research. 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



At present, graduate students maj 
work towards the Mastei oi \ns de- 
gree; planned, hut not yet realized, is 
.1 Ph.D. degree program, I he program 
is under the direction of Professor Rich- 
ard Hendricks, a Ph.D. from Ohio 
State University. 

Essentially, speech and hearing 
science is no! one. hut two programs, 
closelj related. A student may special- 
ize in either speech therapy or hearing 
therapy. Part of each student's time is 
spent in the Universitj Speech Clinic, 
where adults, children, and other stu- 
dents conic to work on various types 
Ol speech and hearing disorders. Each 
year about 200 persons receive indivi- 
dual and group therapy; since 1948, 
more than 2.000 children have been 
seen by members of the Speech Clinic 
Staff, which includes Dr. Hendricks, 
four other faculty members, and gradu- 
ate students. 



Supplemental to the University's dm 

ical facilities at College Park, aie chin 

cal research facilities ;it the Walter Reed 
\im\ Hospital, Forest (den. Maryland, 

the largest hearing center in the world; 

the Veterans Administration Audiolog) 
Clinic in Washington. I). ( . and the 
Hearing ami Speech Clinic at the I'm 

\eisit\ Hospital in Ualtimore. 1 he coin 

bination ol these facilities makes this 

area one of the finest centers I hi speech 
and hearing in the country. 

Demand in Maryland for Speech 
Therapists is very large. There arc- 
nearly 100 Speech Therapists in the 
State available to work with approxi- 
mately 60.000 speech - handicapped 
school children (ages 7-12). Universi- 
ty of Maryland trained therapists are 
presently working in 14 states. 

The value of the program in speech 
and hearing science can hardly be over- 
emphasized. Effective communication 



is an essential ingredient to successful 
h\ ing in today's complex societ) 

According to i)i Hendricks, support 
oi the program depends upon a genera] 
recognition ol ( I i the all pervasiveness 
oi communication problems in modern 
society, <2) the demoralizing effects ol 
speech ami hearing handicaps upon in 

dividual personalities. M) the effec 
ti\eness oi scientific method in the in 
Vestigation Ol such problems, and ( I I 
the need lor professional services in 
speech ami hearing therapy." 

UNIVERSITY MUKAI PAINTED 

A composite-theme mural painting of 
the University of Maryland by Ed- 
mund Robins, a well-known artist, has 
been completed at the College Park 
branch of the Suburban Trust Comp- 
any. 

There are five focal points depicted 
(Continued on next page) 



From left. Edmund Robins, a well-known artist, puts the final touches on a composite- 
theme mural of the University of Maryland at the College Park branch of the Subur- 
ban Trust Company. Looking on are J. Robert Sherwood, president and William R. 
Reading, branch manager, of the bank. 





- — ; j 



^■2V 




t ampus Notes 



in the mural which arc illustrated by 
Memorial Chapel, Rossborough Inn, 
Administration Building, President's 
Home and Byrd Stadium. I he focal 
points include scholarship, administra- 
tion, religion, historv and athletics. 

Robins, a name ol Rochester. New 
^oik. served in the Navv trom 1952 
until 1454 at the Naval Air Station in 
Jacksonville, Florida. He was gradu- 
ated later from the University of 
Florida. 

During the past several vears he has 
done free-lance painting, commercial 
work and mural paintings in Maryland, 
Virginia and the District of Columbia. 

The mural at the College Park 
bank was commissioned bv J. Robert 
Sherwood. President: and William R. 
Reading, Branch Manager, of the Sub- 
urban 1 rust Compan) . 




OFFICTAI l . S. MR I ORCI PHOTO 

Col. Donald F. Westra 



COL. w I s|K\ \l)\1l i n i) ro IHE BAR 
OF THE U. S. SUPREM1 COURT 

( ol Donald 1 . Westra, Military Science 
'50, was admitted to the bar of the 
I nited States Supreme Court January 
12, 1959 

Beginning his education in 1947. Col. 
Westra took night classes at the Univer- 
sity. He continued his education at 
night after his graduation with a B.S. 
degree, attending the Georgetown Uni- 
versity Lav, School from 1950 to 1952 




President Elkin\ presents a diploma certifying successful completion of work for the 
Bachelor of Science degree in Military Science to Captain Ellard J. Connors. Captain 
Connors is the first to graduate from the island of Bermuda in the overseas program. 
Left to right: Colonel George F. Robinson. Commander. Kindley Air Force Base: Dr. 
Ray W. Ehrensherger. Dean of University College which administers the overseas 
program: Captain Connors and Dr. Elkins. 



Upon his transfer to San Antonio. 
Texas in 1952. he continued his legal 
education at St. Mary's University, San 
Antonio. The final semester of Col. 
Westra*s law work was completed under 
Air Force sponsorship during the dav. 
and he received the LL.B. degree in 
1954. 

Presently serving as Executive Officer 
for the Surgeon General of the United 
States Air Force. Col. Westra is licensed 
to practice law before the Supreme 
Court of Texas: the District oi Colum- 
bia courts: the United States Court of 
Appeals. Washington, D. C: and the 
Militarv Court of Appeals. He is a 
member of the Texas Bar Association, 
the District of Columbia Bar Associa- 
tion, and the American Bar Association. 

Col. Westra. his wife and their three 
children live in Bethesda. Mar\land. 



FIRST MARYLAND GRADUATE 

IN HI RMIDA 

When kindle> Air Force Base Cap- 
tain Ellard J. Connors received the 
Bachelor of Science degree in Military 
Science in January, he established a 
whole series ot firsts 

Capt. Connors was the first Man- 
kind student ever to graduate in Ber- 
muda, one of the bases in the Atlantic 
division of Maryland's overseas pro- 
gram: and. according to Bermudan 
authorities, he was the first ever to re- 
ceive a college degree in Bermuda. 
since there is no college on the island. 
Finally, he was the first graduate from 
the Atlantic division in the 1958-59 
school vcar. 



Special commencement ceremonies 
were held at the Kindley NCO Club. 
Dean Ray Ehrensherger presented Capt. 
Connors for the degree which was con- 
ferred bv President Elkins. who also 
delivered the commencement adc 

Approximate^ 200 guests attended 
the banquet which preceded the gradua- 
tion ceremonv. I hev included Colonel 
George L. Robinson, base commander, 
other base officials, and Bermuda school 
officials. 

Capt. Connors, a veteran of 17 years 
with the U. S. Air Force, is a flight 
commander and instructor pilot with 
the 5()3rd Air Rescue Squadron and 
has been with the Strategic Air Com- 
mand since 1955. In addition to pre- 
vious college work, he earned 40 credits 
from the University attending off-duty 
classes at Kindlev and during a previous 
assignment at Goose Bav. Labrador. 



MR. MCCORMICK AGAIN si RV I S AS 
N VI ION vl HI \RT CHAIRMAN 

For the second successive vear. Charles 
P. McCormick. Chairman of the Board 
of Regents, and Baltimore industrialist 
and civic leader, has been appointed to 
serve as National Chairman of the 
1959 Heart Fund campaign, conducted 
throughout the month of February 

In accepting the national campaign 
chairmanship. Mr. McCormick. B< 
Chairman ot the McCormick Company. 
world"s largest producers ot spices, teas 
and abstracts, expressed gratification for 
the early enrollment of large numbers 
ot Heart Fund and Heart Sunday 
volunteers. 



6 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE | 



"The American Heart Association 
does not support the theorj thai fewer 
Americans arc volunteering their time 
and energies Um health and welfare 
causes." Mr. McCormick said. On the 
contrary, "additional hundreds of thou- 
sands of our citizens each \ear come 
forward to help the Heart Fund in the 
realization that the) are helping to 
protect not only the health of their 
loved ones but also the hearts of their 
neighbors," he said. 

The Heart Fund is an inspiring part- 
nership between the public and the 
nation's physicians "which must be 
strengthened and expanded in the 
course of each annual campaign," Mr. 
McCormick pointed out. 



LOAN PROGRAM ESTABLISHED 

President Wilson H. Elkins has an- 
nounced that the University has made 
application to the Federal Government 
for funds to establish student loan pro- 
grams at its various branches under pro- 
visions of the National Defense Educa- 
tion Act. 

For 1959-60 the University is re- 
questing a total of $323,950 in Federal 
funds for its three branches — College 
Park. Baltimore and Maryland State 
College at Princess Anne. 

The Federal Government would pro- 
vide eight-ninths and the University 
one-ninth of the total. 

To be eligible for a loan a student 
must be in need, be capable of main- 
taining good academic standing and be 
enrolled as a full time student. Pref- 
: erence will go to students with superior 
, backgrounds in science, mathematics, 
engineering, modern languages or those 
who desire to teach in elementary or 
secondary schools. 

MATHEMATICS INSTITUTE 
STRESSES NEW APPROACH 

An Institute designed to make mathe- 
matics an interesting experience for 
young people and bring teaching tech- 
niques up-to-date is now in the plan- 
ning stages and will be held at the 
University June 22 through July 31. 

The Institute, under the direction of 
Dr. John W. Brace, Assistant Professor 
of Mathematics, will utilize experiment- 
al material being developed by the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Junior High School 
Mathematics Project and the School 
Mathematics Study Group at Yale Uni- 
versity. 

According to Dr. M. L. Keedy, Asso- 
ciate Director of the Maryland project, 
'the major goal of the program is to 
develop a mathematics course for the 
,7th and 8th grades which is mathe- 

MARCH-APRIL. 1959 



maticall) and psychologically sound, 

and appropriate for present-da) needs 

"Man) mathematical ideas have been 

written into the experimental course 

which have never been taught in these 

grades," Ik- said. 

"An important goal." he continued. 

"is to make mathematics understand- 
able to young students rather than a 
series of manipulations to be performed 
by rote." 

Material developed in the Maryland 

project is now being tried in several 
schools in the Washington Metropoli- 
tan area and in some other parts of the 
country as well. 

The results of the trial of the experi- 
mental course seem to be very good so 
tar. but a thorough evaluation cannot 
be made until the end of the school 
year at which time a statistical evalua- 
tion will be made and a revision of the 
course prepared." Dr. Keedy concluded. 

Dr. Brace pointed out that the Insti- 
tute will be unique in that it will actual- 
ly present experimental material to a 
demonstration class consisting of a 
group of students who will enter the 
seventh grade in September, 1959. 
Each class will be followed by an in- 
formal discussion by participants. 

The Institute is being financed by a 
$37,400 grant from the National 
Science Foundation. 

NEW SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 
ENGINEERING STUDENTS 

Fifteen scholarships for College of En- 
gineering students have been sponsored 
by the seven fire insurance rating org- 
anizations in the Eastern Underwriters 
Association territory for worthy appli- 
cants to be selected from among the 
1959 high school graduates in ten 
states and the District of Columbia. 



rhese include Connecticut, Delaware 
Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, 
Hampshire, New Vnk, Pennsylvania, 
Rhode Island and \ ermonl 

I ach scholarship will be the full foui 
yeai tuition plus room and board on 
the c.unpus for non-resident students. 

students will have summer emplo) 
menl with the rating organization to 
which the) are assigned and each will 
agree to serve that rating organization 

lor at least lour years alter graduation. 

1 he lire Protection ( urriculum, un- 
der the direction of Professor John I 

Bryan, leads to a B.S. degree in lire 
protection, and the program is pat- 
terned alter the one successfully fol- 
lowed by the Western Actuarial Bureau 
at Illinois Institute of Technology lor 
more than thirty years. 

Preliminary selection of students will 
be administered by the scholarship com- 
mittee of the Eastern underwriters Asso- 
ciation pending formal acceptance of 
the applicant by the University. 

Preference will be given to deserving 
high school students with good scholas- 
tic records plus a desire to serve the 
fire insurance business. 



SPRING REUNIONS 
See page 3 



NUCLEAR REACTOR TO BE ACQUIRI I) 

The University has just received a grant 
of $147,335 from the Atomic Energy 
Commission for the acquisition of a 
nuclear reactor. This will provide fur- 
ther facilities for the training of stu- 
(C out in i led on pai>e 21) 



Coach and Mrs. Bill Meek a! an Alumni Breakfast S taller Hilton Hotel, Dallas. Texas. 
Nov. 11. (See Dentistry Column, this issue) 




At Maryland 

Tradition and Progress 
Shape Standards and Spark Achievement 




<s* 



Introductory Remarks 

by 
David L. Brigham 

Director. Office of Alumni Relations 
and 
cutive Secretary. University of Mankind Alumni Association 

A T A RECENT MEETING OF THE GENERAL ALUMNI CO! M II . \ 

**- report submitted by the Publicity Committee was adopted. 
While this does not purport to answer all questions relative to stand- 
ards at the University, past and present, it is nevertheless an effort 
to clear the air on some apparent misconceptions in the minds of 
some. Suffice it to say the big difference is in the present systematic 
screening process. The academic probation plan provides for a 
gradual approach to a 'C* average or better with the requirements 
being increased as the student progresses toward junior standing. 
Students who show little or no capacity, or desire, are eliminated 
at an earlier stage with a minimum of expense and disappointment. 
In effect, this is a selective retention plan rather than a selective 
admission plan although strong efforts are made to discourage 
admission where the prospective student's chances of success appear 
limited. This becomes increasingly important at a time when one 
out of every three high school graduates is entering college. In 
brief, it is now University policy to avoid the normal injustice of 
admitting or retaining an unqualified student at expense to his 
family, the State, himself and his future. The strong desire is to 
direct this student to an area for which he is qualified rather than 
place upon him a burden which he cannot carry. 

In reporting to the members of the 1959 General Assembly. 
Dr. Elkins said. "The Academic Probation Plan which became 
effective in September. 1957. provides a systematic procedure for 
measuring student progress, for maintaining reasonable scholastic 
performance, and for dismissing students whose achievement is 
unsatisfactory. The Plan is not perfect. But this — or a similar 
plan — is vital in order to maintain a quality program at the Uni- 
versity in the absence of a highly selective admissions policy. 

"Our enrollment will continue to increase. We are situated in 
the midst of one of the most rapidly expanding population areas 
in the nation. The vastly increased student enrollments of the next 
decade already are moving through our primary and secondary 
school systems. Additional programs will be requested and needed. 
to serve the varied and expanding economic, social and cultural 
interests of the State." 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



o 



REPORT of the Publicity Committee; 

ADOPTED by the General Alumni Counci 
January 30, 1959 




I\ RISI'ONSI in 1DIH I MIORSI XII \ 1 Ol llll I'l'lUKllY 

Committee recommendation and in accordance with Dr. 
Elkins' expression at our last Alumni Council meeting, we 
ha\e sought data relative to the status of the University o\ 
Maryland. It is not our intention to raise questions, stir up 
controversies, or make comparisons. Our efforts are directed 
onl\ toward determining facts as we have found them to be. 

Since some apparent!) implied that standards in previous 
years were not high and that degrees by reflection, contained 
some sort of taint, we have felt it necessary to touch brief!) 
upon three areas of interest. First, there is the level of aca- 
demic instruction which concerns our faculty. Second, there 
is the extent of accreditation by recognized agencies. Last, 
there is the matter of academic procedure and to some extent 
its relationship to the athletic program. 

From the standpoint of instruction, the University has 
always been at a high level. The caliber of our faculty at all 
times, with a very creditable share of nationally and inter- 
nationally recognized authorities, cannot be questioned. The 
record of our alumni in their respective fields speaks well for 
the University and the instruction they received. 

Since the matter of accreditation has been raised we have, 
in cooperation with University authorities, reviewed this 
picture in a very positive manner. It is our finding that the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
was established in 1921 and a fully accredited charter mem- 
ber of that association was the University of Maryland. Not 
once since 1921 has accreditation for any school, college or 
department of the University been rescinded. 

Individual schools or colleges comprising the University of 
Maryland in 1921 with the date of origin, include Agriculture 
(1856), Arts and Sciences (1920), Business and Public Ad- 
ministration (commerce 1921), Dentistry (1840), Education 
(1920). Engineering (1859), Home Economics (1918), Law 
'(1812), Medicine ( 1807), Nursing ( 1889), Pharmacy (1841), 
and the Graduate School (1918). Schools later established 
and included in the accreditation of 1955 are Military Science 
(1947), Physical Education, Recreation and Health (1949) 
and University College, formerly the College of Special and 
Continuation Studies (1947). 

Other recognized accrediting agencies for individual schools 
placed their initial stamp of approval upon Business and 
Public Administration in 1940, Dentistry in 1943, Education 
in 1948, Engineering in 1937, Law in 1930, Medicine in 
1904, Nursing in 1952 and Pharmacy in 1939. There are 
no recognized accrediting agencies for the other individual 
schools and colleges of the University. 

Academic requirements and procedures have likewise 
been a subject for discussion. Recently rescinded by the 
Faculty Senate and the Board of Regents, was the so called 
'F rule. The student's final grade in a repeated course is 
now the one with which he is credited. Even though this rule 
jwas in effect one year, the nature of the regulation did not 
affect large numbers of students adversely and those who 
were affected were given special consideration by the Petition 
Board. In addition, credit is now given for basic courses in 



An Force ROK ami Health II and IV in computing aver- 
ages. A final action permits a student to be reinstated immedi- 
ately if he has difficult) in am semester anil has previously 
maintained a 2.0 or '(" average, and has not previously been 
on probation. 

The single cause lor academic dismissal is poor scholastic 
achievement. However, the plan, as modified, still has a series 
oi screening procedures. They are: 

1. Failure to pass 509S of the credit hours in a semester. 

2. The student is already on probation and does not reach 
a 1.75 average. (For the second semester freshman 
the average is 1.5.) 

3. Failure to achieve junior standing (2.0 average) after 
registering for 63 hours. There is one semester of 
grace beyond the 63 hours. 

4. A student in O.I.R. (Office of Intermediate Registra- 
tion) must earn cumulative a 2.0 average within the 
semester. 

5. On-trial students must have a 1.5 average at the end of 
the first year and a 2.0 average at the end of two years. 

6. Those who withdraw with a 509J failure must be re- 
instated on probation. 

7. No more than two probation periods are permitted. It 
should be noted that several of these pertain to special 
categories of students (on-trial, O.I.R.) so that every 
student does not feel the weight of numerous rules and 
regulations. 

It has been traditional for a 2.0 or 'C average to be 
required for both junior standing and graduation. Although 
this is also true today, a major difference exists in the "grace 
period" for obtaining junior standing (see Item #3 above). 

Today, a University wide academic probation plan exists. 
In prior years responsibility for student progress, probation 
and dismissal, was primarily the responsibility of the Dean 
and faculty of the college or school in which the student was 
enrolled. 

Academic requirements now, as in the past, are the 
same for all students whether or not they are participating 
in athletics. The Academic Probation Plan is a complete 
statement of all the standards and it is given to all students 
at the time of registration. 

It should be further stated that alumni officially, through 
the General Alumni Council, have purposely excluded them- 
selves from matters which are the prerogative of the adminis- 
tration of the University and of the Board of Regents. This 
includes any action or statement relative to past or present 
athletic conditions. On occasion references have been made 
to the desire of alumni to sacrifice traditionally high aca- 
demic standards for a high ranking football and general 
athletic program. Nothing could be further from the truth. 
Alumni as a whole have great pride in the University of 
Maryland as it has developed over many years, in the high 
standards which have always been maintained, and in the 
desire of each succeeding administration to improve standards 
and enhance the reputation of an institution which facts prove 
has a solid and creditable foundation. 



MARCH-APRIL. 1959 



. 



J- 






9 



A 



- - si S 


^r 






I»hm*I 




Nursing's New 

Whitehurst Hall 



is 



Dedicated in January 



CONCRETE, BRICKS, WOOD, PIPES, ELECTRICAL WIRING, AND 
paint: take these elements plus a few, arrange them in 
the proper order, and another building slowly takes on recog- 
nizable being. The newest building to become part of the 
University's Baltimore campus scene is Whitehurst Hall, re- 
cently completed and occupied by the School of Nursing. 

Formal dedication of Whitehurst Hall took place January 
20. 1959. in Baltimore. Mrs. Sara A. Whitehurst, for whom 
the building is named, is the first and only woman to serve 
on the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland. 
During the 26 years she served, Mrs. Whitehurst was Secre- 
tary of the Board, Chairman of the Budget Committee and 
Chairman of the Nursing School, Medical School and Hos- 
pital Committee. 

Shifting the scene for a moment from the dedication cere- 
mony to the building itself, the reader can learn that it is 
made of reinforced concrete with brick exterior using granite 
and limestone trim. Constructed so that three more floors 
may be added in the future, the new quarters for the School 
of Nursing presently consists of a basement and three floors. 
21.500 square feet of space provides facilities for the teaching 
and administrative activities of the School. Class and con- 
ference rooms, a nursing laboratory, offices for the Dean 
and faculty members are located on the three floors. The 
basement contains locker rooms and a student faculty lounge. 
The building was designed by William S. Stone, Jr., and con- 
structed by Bickerton and Wheeley, Inc. 

In the new building, located at 624 West Lombard Street. 
the School of Nursing begins another chapter in its distin- 
guished history, which had its beginnings in December, 1889, 
when Louisa Parsons, a student of Florence Nightingale, 
organized the first curriculum and faculty. The School pres- 
ently offers a program leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing and programs leading to the degree of 
Master of Science with a major in nursing. 



I 



N THE RECREATION ROOM ON THE FIFTH FLOOR OF THE 

Psychiatric Institute, dedication ceremonies commenced when 
the Very Reverend Edward B. Bunn, President of the George- 
town University, offered the Invocation. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of the University, next pre- 
sented to the gathering a formal statement of the purpose 
of the occasion. 

Governor J. Millard Tawes was then introduced by Dean 
of the School of Nursing Florence M. Gipe. In bringing 
greetings to the group, the Governor said: 

"I share with all Marylanders a deep sense of pride in our 
State University, and no part of the institution is more 
deserving of praise than these schools in Baltimore which 
are dedicated to the noble task of training men and women 
to work in the field of health. 

"I would like first of all to congratulate the Board of 
Regents on its choice of a name for this edifice. Those of us 
who are familiar with the illustrious career of Mrs. White- 
hurst know that no Marylander is more deserving of the 
honor she is receiving. The building will stand as a monu- 
ment to the many years she has devoted to the service of the 
public." 

Greetings were also brought to this occasion by Dr. Ruth 
B. Freeman, President of the National League for Nursing 
and Dr. Genevieve K. Bixler, Head of the Nursing Education 
Project of the Southern Regional Education Board. Dr. Free- 
man, who is an Associate Professor at the Johns Hopkins 
University School of Hygiene, addressed the group on behalf 
of all the nurses in the United States and abroad. Dr. Bixler 
represented the Southern Regional Education Board of which 
the School of Nursing is a participating member. 

Presenting the citation from the Board of Regents was Mr. 
B. Herbert Brown, Secretary of the Board, who has known 
and worked with Mrs. Whitehurst over a period of many 
years. The citation reads: 

(Continued on next page) 



Whitehurst Hall fronts on Lombard Street. 
Baltimore. To its immediate right is the 
Nurses' Residence and to the left hack- 
ground rises the University Hospital. 



^ARCH-APRIL. 1959 



1 1 



' in recognition ol unselfish devotion and loyalty to the 
interests oi the University ol Maryland, as demonstrated over 
a period ol more than twenty-six years bj consistent meri- 
torious service far beyond the requirements ol duty; the Board 

Oi Regents has In resolution directed that this testimonial be 
inscribed and presented to Sara A. Whitehurst as a token ol 
appreciation, together with assurance oi the high esteem in 
which she is held bj all with whom she was associated during 
her long tenure as a member ol this Board." 

W HI I I Hi l<s i HAL! WAS FORMALLY DEDICATED HV MR. 

( harles P. McCormick, Chairman of the Board of Regents. 
\li McCormick also presented a portrait of Mrs. White- 
hurst which will he displayed in a prominent location in the 
foyer ol the building. 

Mr. McCormick began: 

"Today, we meet to rccogni/e a heritage that comes down 
to us over seven decades of time from the days of Florence 
Nightingale and her student, Louisa Parsons, who founded 
nursing education at the University of Maryland in 1889. 
1 hat heritage is a legacy of leadership. 

"We meet also to perpetuate a tradition that has become 
most meaningful to the people of the state — the tradition of 
strength and variety in the health science fields at their state 
university. Nowhere is this better exemplified than in the per- 
formance and achievement of the School of Nursing as it 
grew from a two year curriculum in 1902 to the five year 
combined academic and nursing program set up in 1926. and 
finally to the present four year degree granting program 
established in 1952 — the latter phase so ably developed and 
administered by Dean Florence Gipe." 

Mr. McCormick continued: 

"In three wars, Maryland nursing alumnae have taken their 
place with the University's medical units on foreign soil. At 
home, they have entered active professional service in record 
numbers, wearing with pride the cap first designed especially 
for them by Florence Nightingale. Here is a tradition also. 
I might add. of loyalty and devotion. 

"Finally, we meet to honor greatness of heart and unstint- 
ing service for human betterment in the person of our guest 
of honor today. 

"Mrs. Sara A .Whitehurst of Baltimore is an outstanding 
leader in civic, state, national and international affairs. Her 
social consciousness, her broad gauged point of view have 
pierced a hundred clouded situations with the clear light of 
understanding, to promote good citizenship and good relations 
among the peoples of the world. 

"The Federal Government enjoyed her services as Special 
Assistant to the Civil Defense Administrator. The World 
Health Assembly knows her as one of only three women 
delegates to that important conclave in 1950. 

"A registered nurse. Mrs. Whitehurst is presently serving 
on the National Board of Women's College in Philadelphia, 
and on the Council of the International University Founda- 
tion. 

"At the University ol Maryland, she is remembered and 
will always be honored lor her 26 years o\ service, from 
1933 to 1956, .is the only woman member of the University's 

Board ol Regents and the State Board o\ Agriculture. 

"In dedicating this building to future generations o\ Mary- 
land teachers and learners in the profession oi Nursing. I 
commend it to the spirit oi service exemplified by the dis- 
tinguished lady lor whom it is named Mrs. Sara A. White- 
burst " 

12 



In response. Mrs. Whitehurst said: 

'Words are always inadequate when trying to express 
appreciation for an honor such as has been conferred on 
me today. 

"It is gratifying to learn that the idea, the authority lor 
the honor, and the selection of a building was made b> the 
members of the Board oi Regents whom 1 had served with 
for many years. 

"1 was pleased that they decided on the Nursing Building, 
because 1 had observed the growth of this school, under the 
direction of the present faculty, with great satisfaction. I he 
elimination of the three-year course and the establishment of 
the four-year Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing, with the 
development of a Practical Nursing course has been most 
successful. 

"I am also grateful to the President of the University for 
his enthusiastic cooperation in developing the program, and 
to the faculty, alumni and friends of the School of Nursing 
for the portrait which they presented to the School." 



Tm I'KINC IPA1 SPEAKER I OR THE OCCASION WAS DR. BERTHA 

S. Adkins. Under Secretary of the United States Department 
of Health. Education and Welfare. Dr. Adkins. who is a 
native of Maryland's Eastern Shore, holds an A.B. degree 
from Wellesley College, a Master of Arts degree from Colum- 
bia University and honorary Doctor of Laws degrees from 
Western Maryland College and Hood College. 

"Today we are dedicating a building. Whitehurst Hall, 






President Elkins and The Honorable J. Millard Tawes. Govt 

of the State of Maryland, enter the auditorium to begin lite dedi- I 

cation ceremonies. In the background, to the left of President I 

Elkins. is Mr. Charles P. McCormick. Chairman of the Board of I 

Regents. In the background, to the right of Gov. Tawes. is Mrs. I 

Sara Whitehurst in whose honor the new nursing building was I 

named. 




already endowed b> the foresight and pride ol profession ol 

the nurse for whom it is named Mis. John 1 . Whitehurst 
of Baltimore, Maryland. . . . 

"Sara Whitehurst lias never lost her interest in nursing, 
her own chosen profession. 

"A native of Pennsylvania, Mrs. Whitehurst attended the 
Universities oi Pennsylvania, temple and Johns Hopkins. 
she is a registered nurse in the State of Pennsylvania and is 
On the National Hoard ol the Women's Medical College in 
Philadelphia. 

" I his splendid classroom structure we now are dedicating is 
not only a monument to the past achievements of the pro- 
fession of nursing in Maryland, mj own State, hut it is also 
a bright beacon for its future. . . . 

"Nursing today has achieved maturity. This has been 
accomplished by the partnership o\ nurses and citizens in the 
various communities, by the joint e!forts of the Federal 
Government with the nursing, hospital and medical profes- 



nomenal, man has In no means conquered man) ol oui majoi 

disabling diseases. 

"We still have cancel despite careful detection programs 
We siill have heart disease, despite the miracles ol surg 
the blood anticoagulants, and knowledge ol the effects ol 
stress. We have tuberculosis despite chemotherapy, ami men 
tal illness despite tranquilizers. 

"We base a larger aging population and emotional prob- 
lems at all ages which need studj 

"We also must look anew at the needs ol our children 
the exceptional ones, the handicapped, and those who are 
average. For the environment and education ol a child, his 
opportunity to achieve a balance between freedom and disci- 
pline, are essential to our Nation's future. 

"Nurses must march briskly along all these highways ol 
growth. 

"And, should the time arrive — as it very well may when 
the science of 'wellness' replaces our present concern with 




Dr. Bertha S. Adkins, Under Secretary of the U. S. Department 
of Health, Education and Welfare, delivers the principal address. 
Seated on the platform from left to right are: Miss Francis 
Huntley, Dr. Genevieve K. Bixler, Mr. Enos Stockbridge, Mrs. 
Sara A. Whitehurst. Hon. Louis Goldstein, Gov. J. Millard Tawes. 



sions. We can all rejoice that nursing has made such marked 
progress, especially since World War II. 

"But no matter how much or how fast medical science 
advances, each age will need its Florence Nightingales to 
combat prejudice as well as disease, to give inspiration to 
those caring for the sick, and to give hope to those needing 
care. 

"In this atomic age, we see nursing taking on new meaning, 
new form. Not only are there complicated new devices to 
be managed and miraculous new drugs to be learned, but 
the mind and emotions of man, his physiological reactions to 
the increasingly complicated stresses and conveniences of his 
work and environment must be recognized and understood. 

"Nurses must also study themselves as well as analyze the 
needs of their patients. They need to improve and reform 
the education of nurses. Increasingly they must know how to 
manage and to teach. They must see the need for research 
and prepare themselves as researchers. 

"Although health gains in the last 50 years have been phe- 

MARCH-APRIL. 1959 



Rev. John A. Middaugh, Rev. Edward B. Bunn, Mr. B. Herbert 
Brown, President Elkins, Mr. Harry Nuttle. Dean Florence M. 
Gipe, Dr. Thomas B. Symons, Mr. Charles McCormick. Dr. 
Harry C. Byrd. Dr. Ruth Freeman, Dr. Albin O. Kuhn. 



illness, nurses will be expected to understand the norms, the 
deviations, and all the scientifically devised methods for re- 
storing equilibrium. . . . 

"I would like to see us dignify bedside nursing by making 
it a more rewarding experience for the nurse — and a better 
paying career. Advancement should not require movement 
away from the bedside. 

"Criticisms heard most often are that 'nurses aren't inter- 
ested in patients' and that 'nurses would rather nurse papers 
than people.' This I do not believe. 

"Young women entering nursing careers invariably say they 
have chosen nursing because they 'want to do something' 
for people. . . . 

"The social scientists, the experts on labor, the personnel 
specialists, for years have been deeply concerned with the 
employee's attitude toward his work, his interpersonal rela- 
tionships with peers and supervisors, with his tangible and 
emotional rewards. 



(Continued on page 24) 



13 




By Victor Holm, Field Secretary 

Publicity Chairmen should Address Reports 

of Meetings and Activities to Mr. Holm, 

Alumni Association, Administration Building, 

University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 




Tom Nugent, newly-appointed Head Football Coach, delights a 
meeting of the Baltimore Alumni Cluh. Members of the Board 
of Regents were guests of the Club. 



BA1 IIMORh C I III 

Till BALTIMORl ALUMNI CLUB HELD 

its annual Luncheon honoring the 
Board of Regents January 23 at the 
Hotel Emerson. Baltimore. All of the 
Regents attended with the exception of 
Mr. Edmund S. Burke. Assistant Treas- 
urer of the Board, who is ill. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins. President of 
the University, and Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, 
Executive Vice President, were also 
present. President Elkins introduced the 
members of the Board to the gathering. 

Presiding over the meeting 
Charles F. Ellinger. A. &. S. 37. Presi- 
dent of the Club. 

Mr. Charles P. McCormick, Chair- 
man of the Board, spoke to the group 
of 80 on the composition and duties of 
the Board of Regents. Mr. Enos S. 
Stockbridge reported on the proposed 
expansion of the University in Balti- 
more. Mr. Edward F. Holter, Vice 
Chairman, also spoke at the Luncheon. 

Mr. Tom Nugent, the University's 
new football coach, was introduced to 
the group. He gave a brief talk on 
plans and policies for this year's foot- 
ball team. 




[pparently enthused arc these newly-elected officers of the Wash- 
ington County Alumni Club. From left to right arc David K 
Poole, Secretary-Treasurei ( s<.ott Couchman, Vice President: 
and Harry I . Vollmer, President, these gentlemen also served 

as temporary officers of the Club before the elections were held 
at the ret ent meeting. 



WASHINGTON COUNTY CLUB 
ThU RECENTLY I STABL1SHED WASHIN'.- 

ton County Alumni Club held a meet- 
ing Saturday. January 31. 1959. at the 
Hotel Alexander in Hagerstown. The 
most important order of business was 
the election of officers and a board of 
directors. Elected to the Presidency of 
the Club was Harry F. Vollmer. III. 
B.P.A. '40. C. Scott Couchman. M. 
Ed. '5 1 . was elected Vice President and 
David K. Poole. Jr.. Law '53, 
elected Secretary -Treasurer. 

In addition to electing officers, the 
Club adopted a constitution. 

Guest speaker for the occasion was 
Dr. Reuben G. Steinmeyer. Professor 
of Government & Politics at the Uni- 
versity. Dr. Steinmeyer spoke on '"Rus- 
sia Today." 

There were about 130 alumni pres- 
ent from Washington and nearby areas 
of Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Mr. 
Holm. Alumni Field Secretary, de- 
scribed the meeting as "highly success- 
ful" and "most gratifying." 



14 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Meet your Alumni Association officers: seated. 
Frank Block, '24. President: standing, left to right, 
Victor Holm. '57. Assistant Secretary: Harry Bos- 
well. Jr., '42, Vice President: David L. Brigham. 
'38, Executive Secretary: and Mrs. Geraldine P. 
Edwards, '31, Vice President. 



Meet Your 
Alumni 



Association 
Officers 



FRANK BLOCK 

Affable, energetic frank block, pharmacy '24, is presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association. He was elected 75th Presi- 
dent of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association at its 76th 
Annual Convention last year. 

Frank is a native Marylander. born in Baltimore. August 1. 
1904. He attended the Baltimore City College, graduating 
i in 1922. He studied pharmacy at the University of Maryland, 
graduating and becoming a registered pharmacist in 1924. 
-After a short period of employment as a pharmacist, he 
'became owner of Curtis Bay Pharmacy and has operated that 
establishment for a number of years. 

His association activities are many and varied. He is a past 
president of the following organizations: Alumni Association. 
School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland; Baltimore Met- 
ropolitan Pharmaceutical Association: Baltimore Veteran 
Druggists; and Alumni Club of Baltimore. At the present 
he is a member of the Board of Directors of the Calvert 
Drug Company. 

Besides those organizations mentioned, he holds member- 
ship in the American Pharmaceutical Association and the 
National Association of Retail Druggists. He is a member 
of the Masonic Order, Scottish Rite and Yedz Grotto. Frank 
has served on many pharmacy committees on a local, state, 
and national level. He was chairman of the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association Legislative Committee for several 
years. 

Frank is married to the former Eva H. Cohen of Baltimore. 
They have two sons. Jerome is a pharmacist and is associ- 
Ued with his father in operating the Curtis Bay Pharmacy. 
David is a scholarship student at the Peabody Conservatory 
)f Music. The Block family makes its home in the Forest 
3 ark section of Baltimore. 

Next to his family. Frank has shown unusual devotion to 
he profession of pharmacy. With his background of activity 
ind experience, he is having a most successful term as 
'resident of the Association. 

vlARCH-APRIL, 1959 



HARRY BOSWELL 

The passport of harry boswell, vice president of the 
General Alumni Council, caused great consternation to his 
Russian hosts in 1956 when he visited Russia at their expense 
as an expert on urban planning and construction, as his pass- 
port carried his occupation as "lawyer." After consulting with 
the chief architects and planners of many of the major cities 
in the Soviet on a professional and social basis, despite strain- 
ing a leg muscle in a wild Armenian folk dance with the chief 
architect and planner of Erevan, they recognized the impor- 
tance of relating the urban social, economic, political and 
legal structure to physical planning, though the relationship 
of merchandising was unclear. Mr. Boswell is active in all 
of these fields professionally with recognition as one of the 
leaders in developing new concepts for their application. In 
addition to the University of Maryland BPA '42 (first honors) 
he has attended other universities and technical schools, 
usually while working at other jobs which included construc- 
tion laborer and superintendent, store clerking, sheet metal 
worker, and business executive. He was one of the fabled 
Air Force officers commanding a squadron before he was 
21 years old; in addition to his extensive command experience 
serving as an engineering officer, a combat pilot, and a test 
pilot. 

The Washington Post, January 3, 1959, carried an article 
about the best known of Harry's community plans, the 
Heurich estate not far from the University, describing some 
of the unique and interesting elements of the planning as 
well as the plan. During the past year the Maryland Court 
of Appeals rendered a decision which advanced the concepts 
of condemnation law in the case of Lustine v. State Roads 
Commission based on a brief and argument by Harry Bos- 
well. In 1956 Harry was selected by the Maryland Real Estate 
Association as "Realtor of the Year." He has served in an 
advisory capacity to the Maryland Legislative Council on 
Economic Development, to the District of Columbia Com- 
(Continued on next page) 

15 






0* 
20 




Mr. liosncll 



missioners on the Housing Code, and to the Maryland 
National Capital Park and Planning Commission; has been 

admitted as an expert before both state and federal courts 
involving both valuation and planning: and has counseled as 
an expert lor governmental and financial organizations as well 
as pn\ate clients He has delivered lectures at a number of 
universities before classes on planning, sociology, and politics. 
on merchandising before various groups including the Mer- 
chandising Course of the National Association of Home Build- 
ers, on future urban development before the intern classes 
of the Housing and Home Finance Agency, on church plan- 
ning and redevelopment before the Department of the Urban 
Church of the National Council of Churches, and made pres- 
entations on community facilities and planning before such 
organizations as the American Municipal Association and the 
Producers Council. 

He has served as President, officer or chairman of many 
organizations among which are President of the Maryland 
Council of Chambers of Commerce. President of the Mary- 
land Real Estate Association. Vice President of the National 
Association of Real Estate Boards. President of the Home 
Builders Association of Metropolitan Washington. Member 
of the Executive Committee of the National Association of 
Home Builders. Chairman of the Community Facilities Com- 
mittee of the National Association of Home Builders. Chair- 
man of the Maryland Conference on Community Develop- 
ment. Chairman of the Committee on Regional Government. 
President of the Prince Georges Community Chest, and mem- 
ber of Organizing Committee and Vice President of the 
Health and Welfare Council of Metropolitan Washington. 

His organizations include Omicron Delta Kappa. Phi Kappa 
Phi. Beta Gamma Sigma. Phi Eta Sigma. Pi Delta Epsilon. 
Sigma Chi. the Masonic Order, Jefferson Island Club. Terra- 
pin Club and many other social organizations and professional 
organizations in the fields of economics, engineering, law and 
real estate. He is a member of the Strategic Planning Com- 
mittee of the Department of Missions of the Episcopal Dio- 
cese of Washington, and was elected an alternate lay delegate 
from the Diocese of Washington to the Episcopal Convention 
in 1958. 

His political interests have included presidency of the 
Young Democrats of Prince Georges County. Delegate to a 
Democratic State Convention, and working at the polls. 
uniquely including, at the request of the precinct chairman, 
polls in an area where he didn*t live but where one of his 
companies developed and sold a large percentage of the 



\// HUnk 




homes. (He does live in one of the subdivisions he designed 
and where an associated companv built many homes.) 

In the business world he is President of Harry A. Boswell 
( o . Realtors, and president, director, or joint venturer ol a 
number of other corporations and business associations 

He is married to the former Margerv Jane Moses and has 
lour children Sandra nine. Rebecca seven. Harrv six. and 
Bruce three. 

MRS. GERALDINE EDWARDS 

GeRALDINE PARR\ EDWARDS, \ l( I -l'KI slDI M OF THE I M- 
versitv ol Maryland Alumni Council and Past President of 
the Home Economics Alumnae Association, graduated in 
1931. She served as dietitian for the Bergen County Hospital 
in New Jersey and later in the same capacity at the Essex 
County Mental Hospital. Her next stop was an eight vear 
tour of duty in Hackensack. New Jersey. Following her mar- 
riage she moved to Florida which became the native state of 
her daughter and then the family returned to Washington. 
D. C. Two years ago her husband was seriously injured in 
an automobile accident and Gerry became dietitian for the 
Children's Center at Laurel. Maryland which is under the 
Department of Welfare of the District of Columbia. She has 
the responsibility for feeding 1600 retarded and delinquent 
children. Mrs. Edwards has also found time to participate 
extensively in Women's Clubs. PTA and her Church. 

DAVID L. BRIGHAM 

Dane brigham. a native marylander. arts & sciem \ s 
'38. has served twelve years as Secretary of the Alumni As- 
sociation. Prior to that time he was active in newspaper. 
radio and publications work in Iowa and Missouri. During 
World War II he served as a Combat Infantryman and later 
as a Press Relations Officer. Activity in the American Legion 
saw him elected State Commander for the year 1955-56. Since 
that time he has been a member of the National Executive 
Committee of the Legion. For the past three years he has 
served as moderator of the award winning weekly television 
program "To Promote Good Will." Other activities include 
two terms as PTA President. 15 years as a volunteer fireman, 
membership in the Lions Club, the Optimist Club. Bov 
Scout Committee Chairman. Church Lay Leader and Board 
Chairman. Montgomery County Committeeman for Founda- 
tion for Infantile Paralysis and Coordinator for the Centen- 
nial — Sesquicentennial Celebration at the University o\ Mary- 
land. 

VICTOR HOLM 

VlC HOLM. ASSISTANT ALUMNI SECRETARY. JOINED THE 

Alumni staff in September. 1957. A graduate of public schools 
in Port Jefferson. Long Island, he spent a vear in Iowa before 
returning to find employment in the Bank of Northern Brook- 
haven in Port Jefferson. Until his entrance in the service in 
1950. he operated a photographic store and studio. Service 
was with the Signal Corps through 1952 and included a year 
in Germany. Vic entered the University of Maryland in 1453 
and graduated with a major in English in 1957. As a student 
he was elected to Omicron Delta Kappa (Men's Honor So- 
ciety) Pi Delta Epsilon. Sigma Delta Chi and Alpha Phi 
Omega. 

He was active on all student publications and was chief 
photographer for the Yearbook. Old Line. M' Book, and the 
Diamondback. Following graduation prior to assuming 
alumni responsibilities. Vic served in the Photographic Sec- 
tion oi the University o\ Maryland. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE » 



THE FUND 



• 150 Alumni Respond to call 
for Volunteer Team Captains 



• Expanded Training Program 
Underway 



• Dr. Elkins Actively Supports 
the Program Operation 




All'MNI Kl SI'ONSI ID A (All I OR FUND REPRESENTATIVES 

this yeai is materially greater than last year, reports Dr. 
Albert F. Cioldstein. (ieneral Chairman ol the (neater Uni- 
versity of Maryland Fund. Dr. Goldstein said that the main 
goal of the Fund this year is to strengthen the ranks ot both 
Fund representatives and alumni contributors. 

Fast year, more than 1.000 alumni organized into 150 
teams, served in the General Canvass; approximately 3,000 
alumni contributed to the Fund. This year, some 150 alumni 
have already indicated their acceptance of team captain posi- 
tions, and the response to a call for Fund representatives is 
running strong. 

In 1959, Fund workers will be benefited by an expanded 
program of training. They will work closely with their 
Regional Managers and meet frequently in small groups to 
organize and integrate their activities. During March and 
April, District Representatives will be enrolled in Fund work- 
ers' clinics; a special training film and "home movies" from 
the Baltimore and College Park campuses will be shown. In- 
struction folders and other materials have been improved: the 
general Fund brochure has been expanded to include com- 
plete information on the Fund and its past operations. 

Objectives of the 1959 program are: 

1) Establish an Alumni Student Aid Fund; 

2) Provide furnishings for the now-under-construction 
Baltimore Union-Dormitory; 

3) Support special library collections for the McKeldin 
Library at College Park and the Medical Sciences 
Library now under construction in Baltimore; 

4) Aid faculty development and achievement. 

Fund Planning Committee members are: Dr. Harry Levin, 
DDS '26; Mr. Howard C. Filbert, Jr.. MS Engineering '53; 
Mr. R. C. O'Connor. Jr.. BPA '54; Dr. John C. Krantz. Jr., 
MD '28; Mr. George M. Anderson, DDS '19; The Hon. 
Leon H. A. Pierson, LLB '23; Mr. Thomas E. Beam, AGR 
'50; and Dr. Goldstein. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of the University, in a 
recent statement pointed up the significance of the Alumni 
Fund and its importance to the entire University family. 

"The Greater University of Maryland Fund was estab- 
lished to encourage the active support of alumni and other 
friends of the University in worthy projects. We were indeed 
gratified by the response during the first year of its operation 
in 1958 which, to us, was indicative of a positive attitude to- 
ward the University. 

"While the amount of funds received is important, the 
success of the program must be determined by the number 
who participate. However, we do not want anyone to con- 
tribute unless there is a sincere desire to do so. This is not a 
drive' but rather an opportunity to promote the welfare 
of our educational program. 

"The basic support for the University will continue to 
come from State appropriations and special funds, including 
tuition and fees. A relatively small supplementary fund, 
for special purposes, may mean the difference between a good 
and a superior institution. It is for this reason that we invite 
vour thoughtful consideration." 



MARCH-APRIL, 1959 



17 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR Sports Editor 



Millikan's Men 

Finish Strong 



*. 



I 



1 Hi: ATLANTIC COAST BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT AT RALEIGH WILL HAVE 

been concluded when this issue is mailed to alumni. 

Following their great 69-51 upset victory over the nation's number one 
team. North Carolina, the Terrapins won favor as the real dark-horse to 
win the tourney and once again represent the conference in the NCAA 
playoffs. 

The Terps have been unpredictable, but are the outstanding team all 
thought they would be when they put all the pieces together at the same 
time to play top-flight ball. If the Red and White win the coveted ACC 
crown, then Millikan will finish with better than the .500 mark. If they 
don't, it will be the first time in his coaching career that he finished with a 
losing season. 



Scores of this year's games 

Maryland 53 

Maryland 62 

Maryland 63 

\l \m i \M) 56 

Maryland 50 

Maryland 68 

Maryland 45 

Maryland 54 

Maryland 64 

Maryi \nd 59 

Maryland 46 

Maryland 61 

Maryi and 69 

Mari 1 and 57 

\1 \io i wn 53 

\l AIO I AND 65 

\| \rs. i \\n 37 

\I \K1 i \nd 77 

M \IO 1 \ND 50 

Maryi and 69 



at press time: 

North Carolina State 55 

Northwestern 66 

Virginia 56 

Kentucky 58* 

Navy 53 

\V \ki Forest 65 

Mississippi State 56 

Loyola 50 

Duke 31 

South Caroi ina 41 

( 1 I MSON 55 

Georgetown 53 

Dike 78 

North Caroi ina 64 

Wake Forest 56 

Georgi Washington 66* 

North Caroi ina State 53 

Cli mson 58 

Virgin] \ 62 

Nor i ii C \roi INA 51 



Overtime. 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZI 



Tom Nugent Comes to College Park, 

Estimates the Situation 



- and Makes Plans to Conquer 



OM NUGENT HAS ARRIVED AT COLLEGE PARK AND HAS CON- 

quered this little college community and the larger community 
Comprising the University family. 

Radiating confidence and charm. Nugent met the Terp 
[football team and the metropolitan press and immediately 
; won a host of friends. He has met with University officials, 
the Board of Regents, and Governor J. Millard Tawes and 
was well received. 

You. too, will like Coach Nugent. 

Nugent brings with him his famous philosophy, the "'Magic 



of Believing." "You win if you believe in yourself. You have 
got to believe that you can do your job better than the man 
you are playing against. You must believe in yourself." I h is 
he has told the boys who are Maryland's hopes to return to 
the national scene, a goal Nugent has set as he begins his 
four-year stay at Maryland. 

"It's a wonderful feeling to have the opportunity to plaj 
the best, as we will on the Maryland schedule," Nugent 
gleamed. "And I feel that if we can get everyone believing, 
we can win against anyone. But the enthusiasm must start 




* 




from the top. I hat is m> job, to gel it started and have it 
catch on. 1 know it can and will be done. It it isn't done, 
then 1 have done a poor job, and that can't happen." 

"I'm terrifically enthused about the job." he continued. 
"The school has a gre.it background and the Future is bright." 

Nugent has said that he plans to throw the ball a lot and 
to have a wide open game on offense with lots ol imagination. 
We'll be colorful. We will run a lot ot formations. 1 wouldn't 

have it am other was It will be rock and sock on defense. 

with a stress on defensive fundamentals. We will not be un- 
orthodox oi\ defense but we will surprise with our offense." 
IK- has indicated he will go to the extreme offensively to 
score. "Sometimes the extreme boomerangs, but we'll take 
our chances." 

I he affable Nugent certainly believes he Can win. 

"I think we can get a real good team. You don't need 
too main scholarships and I think it is silly to be promiscuous 
with scholarships. You can have too many just the same as 
noli can't have enough. II 1 can't produce winning teams 
under our setup. I will have nobody to blame but myself." 

N UGENT HAS SET \ HI is I I RING I' AC I IN HIS EFFORTS TO GET 

started at Maryland. He has had to get his stalT together, get 
them organized, and launch his recruiting program. But his 
most important assignment was to have each member of the 
squad who is returning for the football team next fall to come 
into his office for a personal halt-hour visit. This has given 
him an opportunity to stud) the boy and learn the things 
about him that mean so much. Also, it has given each boy 
a chance to get to know his coach. 

The final impression left by Nugent on each boy was the 
same. They all confided that he was a "great guy." They 
came away with the feeling that Maryland was going to 
"come back," and they were going to be part of the new era. 
And Nugent himself admits that he saw a great many "fine 
boys" and enough to set up a nucleus he needs to start off 
with. "They are wonderful." he said. "I am real excited 
about our job. I can't wait until spring practice begins." 

Nugent is credited with the invention of the I Formation, 
the Double Quarterback, and the Typewriter Huddle. 

In his I Formation, the quarterback, right and left half, and 
fullback line up in that order directly behind the center. The 
Double Quarterback system was employed by Nugent as a 
high school coach. He used it when he had a left and right- 
handed quarterback. In the Typewriter Huddle, the players 
form two rows facing the quarterback with the first row bent 
over and the second row standing. 

Nugent is a native of Lawrence. Mass.. and a 1936 grad- 
uate of Ithaca College where he quarterbacked the team. 

After college, he returned to Lawrence and coached the 
Essex Training School team, turning out two undefeated 
squads. After service with the Air Force, during which he 
coached the Rosecrans, Missouri Flyers, he went into high 
school coaching at Hopewell and Williamsburg. Virginia. In 
four years, his teams lost only two games. 

He took over as Head Coach at Virginia Military in 1949. 
created the I Formation and with his \ All team a 30-point 
underdog, upset Georgia Tech. 14-13 in 1950. In 1951. his 
team won seven ^nA lost three, and tied Maryland for the 
old Southern Conference title. After the 1952 season. Nugent 
turned down the coaching job at North Carolina State and 
went to Florida State. At the former all-girls' school, he 
built a football team which earned major status. 

The call to Maryland comes as a great "challenge.'' as he 
puts it; but he adds. "I accept it with confidence." 

I his is our new coach. You will like Tom Nugent. 

20 






( ampus Notes 

( ontinued from page 



dents, both undergraduate and gradu- 
ate, in the applied nuclear field. 

Uthough the final design has \io\ 
been determined, the reactor is expected 
to be of the "swimming pool" type. 
I his t\ pe consists of an assembly of fuel 

plates located under perhaps 15 feet of 
water. The fuel plates are an alloy of 

aluminum and uranium enriched with 
the fissionable isotope, uranium 235. 
clad in aluminum. The water provides 
the small amount of cooling required, 
shields the operators, and allows con- 
venient and visible access to the re- 
acting assembly. The reactor is ex- 
pected to be operating for training pur- 
poses in the 1959-1960 school year. 

Courses in nuclear engineering, which 
is considered to be practical applica- 
tion of the effects of nuclear and high 
energy radiation on materials, were 
begun at the University in the fall of 
1954; the program is primarily on a 
graduate level. Courses of study lead- 
ing to the master and to the doctor 
degrees with a major in nuclear engi- 
neering are now available. This reactor 
will serve this program primarily; how- 
ever, students from many other disci- 
plines will also use the reactor. 



1 ,ii 1 C C ii. ih. mi I hospital and 

institution librarU \ I 
National Society for Crippled 

( Children and Adult I ibrat \ 
I 1 S. LaSalle Street 
Chicago, Illinois 

Miss M. Bernice Weise {school 
libraries ) 

School Libraries, Baltimore Depart- 
ment ol Education 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Information about registration, pro- 
gram, etc.. will be released soon, but 
general inquiries about the program 
should be addressed to Keith Doms, 
Chairman. Section on Buildings and 
Equipment, Carnegie Library, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. 



A series ol demonstrations conducted 
in personnel ol the laboratory followed 

the tOUJ ol inspection, affording mans 

packers an opportunity ol seeing lor 
the insi time methods employed in the 
laboratory for testing crab meat, 

Among the demonstrations given 
were "tryptic digestion ol crabmeat 
lor determination of skeletal fragments 
in the meat," by Mrs. Dorothy Collins; 
"preparation of bacteriological media," 
by Mrs. Kay Taylor; "bacteriological 
testing methods," by Mr. John ( o\; 
"determination of internal temperature 
during retort processing." by Mr. Paul 
Dorscy; "product, evaluation: odor, 
taste, lump-size, appearance, etc.," by 
Mrs. Connie Justice; "terrapin pound," 
by Mr. Samuel Williams; and "labora- 
tory boat," by Mr. James Dennis. 




New Medical Sciences Library, 
now under construction in Baltimore. 



LIBRARY INSTITUTE PLANNED 

A Library Buildings and Equipment 
Institute will be held at the McKeldin 
Library, June 18-20, immediately be- 
fore the ALA Conference in Washing- 
ton. The Institute will be sponsored 
by the Section on Buildings and Equip- 
ment of the Library Administration Di- 
vision of the American Library Asso- 
ciation. 

Librarians interested in presenting 
their library plans during the Institute 
are urged to write as soon as possible 
to one of the appropriate following 
committee members: 

Raymond E. Williams {public libraries) 
Minneapolis Public Library 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Edwin T. Coman, Jr. {college and 

university libraries) 
College of Arts, Letters and 

Science Library 
University of California 
Riverside, California 

MARCH-APRIL, 1959 



CRISFIELD SCENE OF CRAB MEAT 
CONFERENCE 

An investigation of the cooking, hand- 
ling, and distributing problems con- 
fronting processors of crab meat was 
carried out at a "Crabmeat Confer- 
ence," held at the Seafood Processing 
Laboratory in Crisfield January 9 and 
10. 

Bringing together in the laboratory 
members of the U. S. Bureau of Com- 
mercial Fisheries, members of the Na- 
tional Fisheries Institute, and of the 
State Department of Health, as well as 
a number of packers from the East 
Coast and Gulf States where blue crab 
meat is packed, the conference included 
a series of demonstrations on processing 
crab meat and methods for testing the 
physical and bacteriological quality of 
the meat. 

The group was taken on an inspec- 
tion tour of the processing laboratory 
on January 9 with Dr. David Ulmer, 
Research Associate in charge of the 
laboratory, conducting the tour. 



Following lunch at Mariners Metho- 
dist Church, the group returned to the 
laboratory where a review of finding of 
work done on the crab industry with 
Saltonstall-Kennedy funds under con- 
tract with the U. S. Bureau of Commer- 
cial Fisheries was made by Dr. G. W. 
Wharton, Head of the Department of 
Zoology and Director of the laboratory. 
Dr. Wharton's review included such 
subjects as "cooking of crabs," "hand- 
ling of crabs after cooking," "costs," 
and "bacteriological problems." 

January 9 was concluded with a 
"Hospitality Session" at the American 
Legion Home, to which all Crisfield 
packers were invited, giving them an 
opportunity to meet and chat with the 
various state and federal officers attend- 
ing the conference. The group had din- 
ner at the Mariners Church hall. 

The morning of January 10 was de- 
voted to a review of further findings of 
work done on the crab industry under 
contract funds. This review centered 



{Continued on next page) 



21 



C ampus Notes 

Continued from [>•< 



around Mich topics as "packaging, ship- 
ment, and marketing," "objective evalu- 
ation ol the quality ol crab meat.'' and 
qualm control systems lor the indus- 
try 

I he two ila\ session concluded thai 
afternoon with a summary discussion 
ol the specific items on the agenda. 
In speaking ol the meeting, Dr. 

I Imei s.ud. It was a decided success. 
fulfilling its purpose to give a belter 
understanding ol latest findings in the 
cooking, handling and distributing ol 
crab meat resulting from work done in 
the laboratory. I feel we accomplished 
much through our demonstrations and 
reviews to bring packers up to date on 



I \\ I cu is ol the Lewis Crab Factors . 
Brunswick. Georgia; Mr. Theodore 
Jones ol the Belhaven Hsh \ Oyster 

Belhaven, North Carolina: Mr. 
J. H. Richardson ol the Martin & 
Richardson Seafood Co.. Newport 
News, Virginia; Mr. Ivy lodd ol the 
I odd ( o . ( ambridge; and Mr. J. Loren 
Sterling o! the \lilbourne Oyster Co.. 
and Mr. I. I. lodd. Jr . ol the Metomp- 
km Ha\ Oyster C o., ol c risfield. 

eial othei Crisfield and Eastern 
Shore packers also attended. 

MR. VVO( M M I ss Kl ( I l\l S GRAN I 

\lr. William A. Wockenfuss, Assistant 
Professor in the College ol Engineering, 

is the recipient ol a Dan forth Teacher 
Grant for the year 1958-59. 

The program of Danforth Teacher 
Study Cirants was inaugurated in the 
fall of 1954, created and made possible 
b> Mr. and Mrs. William H. Danforth. 



>> :■► 







-> -> n 






FFrl 






%js 



Frederick Hall 

is one of the four newly-constructed dormitories at College Park. 



matters tending to add to the betterment 
of the crab meat packing industry, 
while we ourselves added to our un- 
derstanding of the packers point of 
view ." 

Attending the Conference from the 
U. S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries 
were Mr. Harold Crowther. Chief, and 
Dr. Harold Allen of the Division of In- 
dustrial Research and Service. Washing- 
ton, D. C . Mr. Frank T. Piskur, Chief, 
and Mr. Charles Ice and Mrs. Mary 
Ambrose, ot the Bureau's Technologi- 
cal I aboratory, College Park; Mr. Har- 
ris Magnusson of the National Fisheries 
Institute; and Mr. C. S. Brinstield. 
Chief, Division of Food Control, and 
Mr. Franklin Hobbs, ol the Maryland 
Department ol Health. 

Representing the Blue ( rab Commit- 
tee ol the National Fisheries Institute 
were the following crab meat packers: 
Mr. John Shaw ol the South Atlantic 

Crab Co.. Jacksonville, Florida; Mr. 



Danforth teachers are college instruc- 
tors not over 40 years of age with at 
least three full years of successful 
teaching experience, who still lack their 
doctorates. Each is nominated by the 
dean oi his college. 

Mr. Wockenfuss has been teaching 
at the University since February. 1953. 
He is a 1944 graduate and also holds an 
M.Ed, degree from the University. Mr. 
Wockenfuss lives with his wife and 
five-year-old daughter in Adelphi, Md. 
He is using his grant to work on his 
doctor's degree at the University oi 
Florida, Gainesville, Florida. 

PKOFESSOR STUDIES ABROAD 

Protessor A. W. Richeson, Professor of 
Mathematics at the School of Pharm- 
acy, spent his sabbatical year ( 1957-58) 
doing research in Europe, chiefly in 
1 ngland, Scotland and Holland. 

Professor Richeson first conducted 
research in London, making arrange- 



ments through the American Embassj 
for access to the reading and mam 
script rooms of the British Museum 
He also obtained permission to coi 
duct work at the Science Museum . 
South Kensington, the Guildhall Mi' 
seum, the Patent Office, the Institutio 
of Civil Engineers, the Institution i 
Mechanical Engineers and several othi 
museums and institutions, all located i 
London. In the course of his worl 
Dr. Richeson examined and absti 
approximately 750 rare books an 
manuscripts, the majority of which ar 
accessible only in London at one or ar 
other of the above-mentioned place 
In addition, he was allowed to examim 
study, and photograph many of th 
early machines and models of machine 
which were developed between 1 50 
and 1X00. 

From London. Dr. Richeson went t 
Oxford University and found some in 
portant manuscripts in the Bodleia 
Library. Following his stay at Oxfon 
he went to Birmingham where he cor 
ducted an examination of the letters ar 
notes of James Watt and Matthe 
Boulton. available only in unpublishe 
form. 

Dr. Richeson proceeded from Birn 
ingham to Sheffield where he made 
study of the early cutlery trade and th 
development of the pottery and 
cast steel industry. He then journey c 
to Edinburgh where he examined som 
important manuscripts and papers n. 
lating to the men who had a hand i 
the development of the coal, steel, an 
iron trades. 

His research culminated in Hollani 
where he travelled in order to stud 
the early engineering methods involve 
in the attempt to drain the English fe 
districts. He visited Amsterdam. Th 
University of Leiden, and Harderwijk 

SCAM AN Kl ( 1 1\ I s \\\ \RD 

Captain Eric J. Scanlan. USAF. 
native of the American Samoa Island' 
was awarded the Air Force Comm. 
tion Medal recently at a special cere 
mony before an AFROTC formation 
the Armory. Presentation was made h| 
Brigadier General T. Dodson Stamp 
USA (Ret.). Assistant Dean for \lili| 
tary Studies. University College i tor 
erly College of Special and Continu| 
ation Studies.) 

Captain Scanlan is presently 
dent at the University under 'Opera 
tion Bootstrap." a program which en' 
ables military personnel to complet' 
their college degrees through full-timt 
on campus attendance during their fina 
semester. 






22 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINI 



Present as the Captain's personal 
uests .1! the ceremon) were the Hon 
rable Roger C. Ernst, Assistant Secre- 
arj ol the Interior, Mi. Anthonj 
ausi, Director of the Icrritorics Divi- 
ion, Mr. Vera Stephens, Mr. William 
com. ins and Mrs. Gladys Rafter, .ill 
t the Interior Department 

l he An Force medal was awarded 
.1 Captain Scanlan tor outstanding 
enlevements while serving in the Paris 
1 c.i between June. 1955 and August, 
958. I hoe included: Commanding an 
Hitstanding Organization; being person- 
ll\ responsible for breaking a Black. 
Market in the Paris area; and contribut- 
ig to excellent Franco-American rela- 
ions with the French military and gov- 
mmental officials. Captain Scanlan 
ontributed to good relations by learn- 
lg how to speak French while overseas. 

APANESE ART EXHIBITED AT LIBRARY 

^ set of 100 woodblock prints by about 
Japanese artists of the 17th to 19th 
enturies has been placed in the exhibit 
ases on the first and second floors of 
le McKeldin 1 ibrary. 

The prints were reproduced from 
■ ood engravings copied from the origi- 
al works, using a process identical to 
iat employed by the artists. 

Twenty complete sets of the exhibit 
■•ere commissioned by UNESCO. 

The collection was made for showing 
i world capitals with the aim of inter- 
sting as wide a public as possible in 
hese works of art for the promotion of 
apanese culture. 

A catalog in Japanese giving a brief 
ccount of the origin and development 
f Japanese prints has been prepared to 
o alons with each exhibit. 



I he punts were loaned to (he lihr.u\ 
for exhibit In Mr. Robert Walker. 

\ssisiant Director ol Procurement and 
Supply, who acquired the exhibit while 

in Japan. It is part of a collection ol 

Japanese prints owned bj Mr, Walker. 
He was in Japan from 1946 until 1954 
and while there he made an extensive 

collection of art of that country. 




Artist's conception of 

the Baltimore Union-Dormitory, 

now under construction. 



SEAFOOD CONFERENCE HELD 

A conference was held by the Chesa- 
peake Seafood Survey Committee on 
January 7 at the University of Mary- 
land. 

The committee, representing the 
oyster industry of Maryland — tongers. 
dredgers, packers, brokers, and shuck- 
ers — invited the University's Depart- 
ment of Zoology and representatives 
of state and federal agencies who are 
responsible for research on or manage- 
ment of oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. 

University zoologists invited to parti- 
cipate were Drs. George W. Wharton, 
Professor and Head of the Department; 
Richard Highton, a specialist on popu- 
lation genetics; Gordon M. Ramm, a 
specialist on development and embry- 
ology; Henry W. Shoenborn, a special- 
ist on nutritional studies and chemical- 
ly defined media: and Howard E. Winn, 
a specialist on the behavior of animals. 

The Chesapeake Seafood Survey 
Committee, under the chairmanship of 
Ivy Todd, includes, Glendon Bailey, 
John T. Handy, Jr., William Wood- 
field, George Harrison, Loren Sterling, 
all packers; K. Thomas Everngam, at- 
torney; George Stapels, engineer; and 
Jerry Valliant, Mayor of Salisbury. 

Also invited were the following per- 
sons who are responsible for research on 
or management of oysters in the Chesa- 
peake Bay: Dr. Benjamin H. Miller, 
formerly of Johns Hopkins University; 
Dr. Dayton E. Carritt, Research Scien- 
tist and Dr. Donald W. Pritchard, Di- 
rector of Chesapeake Bay Institute; Dr. 
L. Eugene Cronin, Director, Elgin A. 
Dunnington, Biologist, and G. Francis 
Beaven, Biologist. Chesapeake Biologi- 
cal Laboratory; Dr. Jay D. Andrews 
and Dexter S. Haven, Biologists, and 
Dr. John L. McHugh, Director, Vir- 
ginia Fisheries Laboratory; James B. 
Engle, and John Glude, U. S. Fish & 
Wildlife Service; Dr. Reginald V. 
Truitt, former Director, Chesapeake 
Biological Laboratory and Dr. Charles 
E. Renn, Microbiologist, Johns Hopkins 
University; David H. Wallace, Director, 
Oyster Institute of North America. 



MSI ll\(. I I ( IIKIK 1)1 S( kiiii s 

m w 1 >u 1 OS 

\ visiting lecturer at llie School ol 

Pharmacy recentl) described a major 

breakthrough in pharmaceutical re- 
search which has enabled him to pre- 
pare the most powerful pain-relieving 
drugs known to man. 

Dr. Arnold H. Beckett. Professor of 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the Chel- 
sea College of Science and Technology 
in London, said that the new analgesic, 
or pain-relieving, drugs will do the 
same job as those presently used, but 
it is hoped that the analgesics will elim- 
inate addiction and undesirable reac- 
tions. Giving morphine as an example. 
he said that the drug has great power 
in the relief of pain, however, extreme 
caution was necessary because of pati- 
ent susceptibility to addiction following 
repeated use. 

Some of the new drugs are 200 times 
more powerful than the best analgesic 
drugs in present use. Dr. Beckett would 
not disclose the names of the new drugs 
because of pending patent applications 
in London. 

He is presently studying the mechan- 
isms by which certain drugs are able to 
kill bacteria and was very optimistic 
in regard to the development of new 
antibacterial drugs through the "design" 
method. 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos, Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry who arranged for the Uni- 
versity lectures said that Dr. Beckett 
is one of the leading researchers in the 
field, 

DR. MONTROLL NAMED 
TO ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Dr. Elliott W. Montroll, a Research 
Professor in the Department of Physics, 
has been named a fellow of the New 
York Academy of Sciences. 

Election to fellowship in the academy 
is conferred upon a limited number of 
members who have done outstanding 
work toward the advancement of 
science. 

Dr. Montroll came to the University 
in 1951, and since that time has carried 
out fundamental research in the fields 
of statistical mechanics, solid state 
physics and chemical kinetics. His pres- 
ent interest concerns the effect of a 
large number of atoms, whether in 
solids, gases, or liquids, on the proper- 
ties of the substances they compose. In 
addition, he is studying the way in 
which the defects and imperfections 
which are always present in crystals 
affect their physical properties. 
(Continued on next page) 



1ARCH-APRIL, 1959 



23 



Nursing Dedication 

( ontinued //<">/ page 13 



"It seems to me thai more thought 
should go into the consideration oi 
these factors in the career ol nursing. 

I he work ot .i nurse is exacting and 
demanding. Hei preparation is becom- 
ing increasingly scientific. Doctors de- 
pend on her. And in her hands human 
life often rests, delicately balanced 
between death and recovers 

I know that much already has been 
done to bring greater depth and satis- 
faction into the practice of nursing. Hut 
I think we nc^d to always remember 
that the quality of nursing care given 
can only reflect the quality of the nurse 
.is an individual. This means not only 
her manual dexterity, her technical 
knowledge, her professional skill, her 
pay, prestige, and recognition, but also 
her inner enthusiasm, her warmth, her 
judgment, her contentment with her 
service, and above all her unfailing 
sense of responsibility. 

"I need not tell this audience that 
there is a definite trend developing 
among nursing personnel for self-study 
and self-improvement. As I became 
acquainted with the Department's nurs- 
ing programs. I was impressed by the 
initiative nurses themselves are display- 
ing to serve patients more effectively. 

"With the help of the Public Health 
Service, nearly 200 hospitals have made 
or are making analyses oi' the way 
their nursing personnel spend their 
time. In the vast majority of instances, 
changes have resulted from the findings. 

"When a hospital learns that its 
better-paid head nurses are required to 
spend an inordinate amount of time on 
charts and other paperwork, it takes 
the logical next step: nursing service 
management reassigns clerical duties to 
clerks or ward aides. As a result, the 
head nurse is able to concentrate more 
ot her skills on directing care. She can 
also spend more time at the bedside 
observing the needs of patients. And. 
she has more time to teach and to sup- 
ervise the lesser skilled personnel under 
her direction. 

"We believe that changes ol this na- 
ture will, in time, succeed in encourag- 
ing the graduate nuise to find greater 
satisfaction in professional nursing 
duties, in the cue ot patients. We be- 
lieve she may thus retain throughout 
her entire professional lite the same 
dedicated spirit oi wanting to help 



people get well as originally prompted 
her to go into nursing. . . . 

"I am especially impressed by the 
leadership that Dean Horence M. Ciipe 

and her faculty here at the University 

ol Maryland School ol Nursing are 
offering nursing as a whole. I his is 
evident not only here in Maryland but 

throughout the South. 

"Dean (upe is concerned not onlv 
with educational methodology, but com- 
petency in clinical fields. She is dedi- 
cated to the education and training ol 
nurses to think, make sound judgments, 
and do comprehensive nursing. 

I his is the kind of education that 
gives the public confidence that nurses 
are ready to answer any realistic call 
for help. 

"We arc not able, any of us. at anv 
given point in time, to spell out all the 
Irontiers. which lie ahead for explora- 
tion. 

"But I would like to leave with you 
a thought, however, which seems to me 
to explain the growing importance of 
the nursing profession: 

"Nurses themselves are discontent 
with everything which does not reflect 
self-knowledge and subsequent growth. 

"Nurses are content only with action 
which contributes to a high level of 
service to the sick and of education to 
prevent illness." 

Dedication ceremonies concluded 
with the singing of "Hail, Alma Mater'' 
by the School of Nursing Glee Club 
and the Invocation by The Reverend 
John T. Middaugh. Minister of the 
Brown Memorial Presbvterian Church. 



Campus Notes 

Continued from page 23 



Spring 



Reunions 



See page 3 



He holds a B.S. degree in chennstr 
and a Ph.D. degree in mathematic 
from the University of Pittsburgh. Dr 
Montroll has held positions on th< 
faculties of Yale, Cornell, and Prince 
ton Universities; University of Puts 
burgh; and Catholic University o 
America prior to coming to Collegi 
Park. 

AMBASSADOR MACARTHUR ADDRESSES 
FAR EAST COMMENCEMENT 

Douglas MacArthur II. United State 
Ambassador to Japan, will present tht 
commencement address when an esti 
mated 36 students from the Far Eas 
Division of the University of Marylanc 
receive their degrees in the secont 
formal commencement ceremonies ti 
be held in Tokyo, Japan, on March 2 ; 

Dr. Albin O. Kuhn. Executive Via 
President of the University, will repre 
sent President Elkins. Dr. Ray Ehrerr- 
berger. Dean of the College of Specia 
and Continuation Studies, will preside 
at the ceremonies, and Dr. Mason G 
Daly. Director of the Far East Din 
sion. will present the candidates foi 
degrees. 

The ceremonies will be held at the 
Kudan Kaikan (formerly FEAF Offi- 
cers Club and Theatre) which is li 
cated in downtown Tokyo along the 
moat not far from the Imperial Palace 
The ceremonies will start at 3:00 p.m 
and will be followed by a reception. 

Among the guests at the ceremonies 
will be high ranking U. S. mil 
officials and Japanese governmental 
officials. Representatives from several 
Japanese universities are also expected 
to attend. 

Mr. MacArthur. a distinguished ca- 
reer foreign service officer, has served 
in many diplomatic overseas pi 
Since 1935. he has held diplomatic 
signments in Canada. Italy. Portugal. 
France. Belgium, and Japan, in addition 
to serving in the Department of State 
in Washington. D. C. 

Earlv in 1953. President Eisenhower 
appointed him Counselor of the De 
partment of State, one of the most im- 
portant key positions in the State De 
partment. In that capacity Ambassador 
MacArthur has attended many of the 
international conferences in which the 
United States has participated. 



24 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Ho worked close!) with the I'resi- 
ent and with the Secretary ol State in 
oordinating United States plans and 
olicies for the Big Three Bermuda 
inference in 1953, the Berlin Confer- 
nee m 1 1 >M. the Geneva Conference 
t Heads of Government and the subse- 
uent Geneva Foreign Ministers Con- 
.ienee in 1955, and tor the SEATO 
onferences in Manila. Bangkok, and 
Larachi. 

Embassador MacArthur succeeded 
embassador John M. Allison as United 
tales Embassador to Japan in I eb- 
iiary, 1957. 

K. KOIUNSON NAMED AN OL'l STANDING 
dentist: Rl COGNIZED NATIONAI 1 Y 

)r. J. Ben Robinson, Dean Emeritus of 
ie School of Dentistry. University of 
laryland, and Dean Emeritus of the 
chool of Dentistry. West Virginia 

Diversity, has heen selected by the 

nited States Information Agency (the 
National Library of Medicine) as one 
t the "Twelve Outstanding Dentists — 
ast and Present." 

The selection of twelve outstanding 
enlists was made in response to a re- 
uest from the Dental School at the 
Iniversity of Haiti, Port-au-Prince, 
laiti. where a permanent exhibit of 
icir photographs will be placed. 

Dr. Robinson has had a distinguished 
areer in dental education and dental 
rganizations. He served as Dean of 
ie University's Dental School from 
914 to 1953. In 1953 he took the helm 
t the new School of Dentistry at West 
'irginia University and assisted in the 
:hool's development and planning un- 
1 1958. He is a Past President 
f the American Dental Association, 
ie American Association of Dental 




Schools and the American College of 
Dentists He is the recipieul oi man) 

honors and aw auk and is the author ol 

scores ol articles on the subjects ol 
dental education and dental history. 

In addition to Dr. Robinson, the list 
ill the twelve outstanding dentists in- 
cludes Horace H. Hayden and C'hapin 
A. Harris who. in 1840, founded the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
now the School of Dentistry. University 
of Maryland. 



College of 

AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 



si I i/l K IN OHIO 

I he Reverend C. Philip Selt/er, '43, has 

transferred from Washington, D. C. to 

Salem Lutheran Church. Ellerton, Ohio. 

(Continued on next page) 



Dean J. Ben Robinson 

1ARCH-APR1L. 1959 



Carriei 



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Air Conditioning 

than any other make 



The CARRIER Division, THE UNITED CLAY 
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following University of Maryland Buildings 

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Chemical Engineering Dept. 
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Physics Building 
President's Residence 
Skinner Building 
Sylvester Hall 
Symons Hall 
Terrapin Room 

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25 



Mr Seltzer reports he has a large con- 
gregation ol teachers, farmers, ilorists. 
nurserymen, and suburbanites. 

\ I (,l I \HI I HI "i 1 K 

Kenneth Whereley, '49, has been 
moved up h> Safewa) Stores. After 
spending a year inspecting I nuts and 
vegetables lor the I nited States Depart- 
ment ol Agriculture, Mr. Whereley 
went wiih Safewa) Stores as a produce 
buyer. For the past several yean he 
has been in Florida and recently was 
transferred to Laredo, Texas in charge 
ol the office that buys vegetables tor all 
the Safewa) stores in the United States 



KIDW 1 I I in nun 

Arthur S. Kidwell, '35, has left the De- 
partment of Entomology to take a po- 
sition with the International Coopera- 
tion Administration in Haiti. He and 
his family reports they are enjoying the 
life in Port-au-Prince and he finds his 
work uith agricultural pests control 
most interesting. 

BROWN I 1 I HI YS FARM 

James F. Brownell. '39. has purchased 
Whitehall Farms near Round Hill. Vir- 
ginia. The farm has over 700 acres 
and is equipped for 150 dairy cows. 
The manor house is of colonial archi- 
tecture and is over 100 vears old. 



PAT1ENC1 Ol s\Mxj 

W. J. Sando. '20. has spent 35 yean 
Ol intergenUS crossing to get a superior 
quality ol wheat Evolution is slow in 
plants hut Sando was interested in de- 
veloping h\brids that might lead to a 
variety ol wheat ol perennial-growth 

habits. 

I he h\bnds came trom work started 
b\ Sando in 1923. It took 12 years ot 
determined effort to create the original 
crosses. 40.000 pollinations of these re- 
sulted in a handful of seed, and 23 
yean of further breeding to bring about 
the present encouraging h\brids He is 
now retired from the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture, but he has 
started a chain reaction of work in 
plant breeding. 

CORY SCHOLARSHIP TO TOMPKINS 

Daniel M. Tompkins, a senior major- 
ing in Horticulture, from Waldorf. 
Maryland, received the Ernest N. Cory 
Scholarship for this year. Dan has 
worked on Entomology projects at the 
Plant Research Farm and did research 
work one summer on a large farm in 
Garrett County producing vegetables. 
His grade point average is one of the 
highest in the College of Agriculture. 

TEACHING IN EGYPT 

Dr. Aly A. Morad, Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. '44. is leading an active life in 



Egypt. Dr. Morad teaches at the Uni 
versity of Alexandria and is a Consul! 
ant at the Ministry of Agriculture. H 
also operates his two farms near Cairr 
I he family has grown to three bo\s. 

HI K!)l I I i in p| Kl 

Roger F. Burdette. '33. is in Lim«- 
Peru, as a member of a team that 
making a survey of Peruvian agriculturj 
tor the Food and Agriculture Organize 
lion of the Lnited Nations. 

Burdette and his family have sper 
most of the past eight \ears in Sout 
America with FAO. His previou 
signments were in Chile. Ecuador. an< 
Argentina. He sa\s the> spend man 
weekends exploring the Inca ruins. 

AMBASSADRESS 

Mar\ Grace Mullinix has returned ti 
her Howard County home after spend 
ing six months on farms in German) a 
an International Farm Youth Exchangt 
Delegate. She lived with four tarn 
families under the IFYE Program. ; 
people-to-people exchange for promot 
ing understanding and friendship. 

Writing about her first host family 
she said. "My host father had severa 
fields of peas and as each field 
ripe, everyone from the village came u 
help with the harvest. Men. women, ant. 
happy smiling children, all working sidt. 
by side and singing as they worked. Be- 
side me a girl was humming Tammy 



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26 




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THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



' 



and other populai American songs 
which made me feel righl a( homo. 

I his u.is .iKo .1 good waj to mod the 
neighbors." 

As M.u\ was leaving for homo a host 
father said, "you are the best ambassa 
dress America could send to German) 
and you will make a far better ambassa 
dress than am government official Ger- 
man) could send to America." 

According to Sherard Wilson. State 
4-H Club Agent, there were 1 16 Ameri- 
can young people from 36 states who 
wore abroad in 44 countries last year. 

\iul 147 youths from 44 countries came 
to the United States to live and work 
with farm families under the IFYE 
program. 

CIVILIAN 

Ciustax H. Frase. '56, has completed a 
two year tour of duty with the U. S. 
Arm) Engineer Battalion in Germany. 
He and his family are located at 
Chester, Maryland. 

GOOD READING 

Agricultural alumni still have time to 
write books. Samuel F. Potts, '24, is 
the author of a book entitled Concen- 
trated Spray Equipment, published by 
Dorland Books. Mr. Potts has retired 
from government work in Connecticut 
and now lives in Mississippi. 

Dr. Harold H. Shepard, '27, has 
another book to his credit; it is en- 
titled. Methods of Testing Chemicals 
on Insects, and is available from Bur- 
gess Publishing Company. 

POULTRY JUDGING CHAMPIONS 

The University of Maryland poultry 
judging team took top honors for the 
third year in a row at the Eastern 
Intercollegiate Poultry Judging Contest 
at Rutgers University. 

The Maryland team racked up 3,123 
points to beat out second place Con- 
necticut with 3,082. The Connecticut 
team was coached by Dan Talmadge, 
Professor of Poultry and a 1938 grad- 
uate of the University of Maryland. 

Members of the Maryland team 
were: Daniel W. Daly, Hyattsville; 
Robert D. Noren, Parsonsburg; and 
James H. Comings, Hyattsville. The 
team was coached by Professor George 
D. Quigley. 

BANKER 

Dr. Norman Urquhart, Agricultural 
Economics. '37, has been appointed 
Associate Economist at the First Na- 
tional City Bank of New York. The 
Urquharts have four children and re- 
side at Pearl River, New York. 
(Continued on next page) 




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MARCH-APRIL. 1959 



27 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Stall of the ( ollege 



< I >M MISSION] l> 

I hue ol the College's 1958 graduates 
were recentlj commissioned .is second 
lieutenants in the Marines. Francis W 
Just. John K. Fritsch, and Gerald P 
( riscuolo completed the ten weeks 
Officer Candidate ( ourse at Quantico 

which screens applicants from the n.i 
tion's colleges and from the enlisted 
ranks. I he) are now enrolled in the 
nine-month officers basic course, also 
at Quantico. 

gran i ro DR. Will 1 1 
Dr. Charles E. White of the Department 
oi ( bemistry, has been granted $1 1,000 
by the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear 
Studies to cans out a two-year inves- 
tigation ol the spectral characteristics 
of fluorescent metal chelates. 

ELECTED TO CHAIR 

William L. Lamar, '29. has been elected 
Chairman of the American Chemical 
Society's Division of Water. Sewage and 
Sanitation Chemistry for 1959. 



I he new ( hairman has carried out 
important research on stream pollution 
and the chemical quality ol surface and 
ground waters. He joined the United 
states Geological Survej in 1929 as a 
chemist, becoming District Chemist ol 
the Southeastern States in 1943. Dis- 
trict Chemist ol the Ohio Basin and 
I ast North Central States in 1948, and 
■\ica ( hiel nl the Pacific ( oast Area 
in 1957. the position he now holds. 

Mr. Lamar lias been a member of 
the American ( hemical Societ \ since 
1931. He also is a member ol the 
American Water Works Association 
and the American Societ) for lesting 
Materials. 



BODI RECOGNIZED 

Professor Carl Bode oi the Department 
of English has been elected a fellow ol 
the Royal Society of literature of the 
United Kingdom. This Society, whose 
fellows include mam ol the most dis- 
tinguished names in British letters since 
its founding in 1X23. has as its purpose 
"'the advancement of literature 

I he number oi fellows is limited to 
250; another American fellow of the 
Society ofTers the unofficial estimate 
that there are currently about twenty 
American fellows with not more than 
five or six in academic life. 

Professor Bode, who will return to 
the University next September, is cur- 
rently on leave o( absence serving as 



the Cultural Attache of the Americ. 
Embassy in London. In connectit 
with his official position. Dr. Bode hi 
been active in promoting interest 
American studies in the programs ' 
British universities, and he is giving 
lecture series this winter on Americ; 
literature. In addition to mam revie\ 
of books on American subjects. D. 
Bode has published a number of poeni 
in British literary periodicals, and tl 
Heinemann publishing house will issi 
a volume oi Ins verse this spring undi 
the title The Man Behind You. Tl 
London linns ol Saturday. Decembi 
6, carried a leading editorial of a| 
proval on a recent essay of Dr. Bode 
about the role of literature in conveyii 
a picture of a national culture. 

I I 1 I OWSHIP \w \ K | ) | |) io PHII I IPS 
Mr. Cj. Briggs Phillips. '54. is the n 
cipicnt of the Secretary of the Army 
Research and Study Fellowship. Phi 
lips is presentl\ Assistant Chief c 
Agent Control Branch. Safet\ Divisioi 
Fort Detrick. Beginning in April. Y 
will study methods of dealing with tr 
prevention of laboratory-acquired il 
nesses among scientists. His res< 
will take him to 19 foreign coun 
including Australia. Japan. Norwa; 
Sweden. Denmark. Finland. German) 
France. United Kingdom. Italy. Porti 
gal. Greece and Switzerland. He is th 
second Fort Detrick scientist to receh 
this high Army honor. 



i^toverlanci 
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28 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



\|i Phillips is t he author 01 CO 
tuthor of 32 technical publications. He 
v .1 membei ol the Societj i>t American 
lacteriologists and the American Public 
lealth \ssociation. 

.oils i ROM mi MUSK Di r \k rMENT 

I he Music Department has just com- 
peted the plans for its Summer Work- 
hops to be presented at the College 
•ark Campus during the 1959 Summer 
Session, with the cooperation of the 

allege of Kducation and University 
Allege I formerly C.S.C.S.). The Work- 
hops (Mus. Ed. 175 and ISO) will 
ncet in the afternoons for a two- 
veek period, enabling students to regis- 
ei for additional hours in other courses 
luring the Summer Session. 

A Workshop in Band Music will be 
onducted by James Neilson, Professor 
ti Music and Director of Bands, Okla- 
toma City University, President of the 
"ollegc Band Directors National Asso- 
iation, and widely known band con- 
luctor and adjudicator. 

\ Workshop in Choral Music will be 
onducted by Robert Hufstader, Direc- 
or of the Conservatory of Music, Rol- 
ins College. Mr. Hufstader, former 
lead of the Choral Music Department 
if the Juilliard School of Music, is 
nown nationally as an organizer of 
mtstanding choral groups. 

During the second week of the work- 
hops a Band and a Chorus of selected 
ligh school students will reside on cam- 
>us and serve as a demonstration group, 
hey will rehearse daily under the 
uest and will present a concert on 
uly 17th. 

In March of this year Hubert Hen- 
erson. University of Maryland Direc- 
ar of Bands, will be an adjudicator for 
ve District Music Festivals in South 
arolina and for one such Festival in 
irginia. 

During the February semester break, 
le Chapel Choir, under the direction 
f Fague Springmann, traveled to Flori- 
a for several appearances there. The 
ten's Glee Club, directed by Paul 
raver, toured to Danville, Va., for a 
oncert there and stopped off in Rich- 
lond for a performance sponsored by 
le Maryland Alumni Chapter there. 

Homer Ulrich, Head of the Music 
Jepartment, presided over a panel dis- 
ussion at the February meeting of the 
1TNA held in Kansas City. 

The members of the Maryland Chap- 
:r of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia will act 
s hosts for the fraternity's province 
anvention to be held on the campus in 
>pril. Chapters from many Eastern 
alleges and universities will visit the 
ampus at that time. 

(Continued on next page) 



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29 




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bined with stability and se- 
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Engineering at Douglas is 
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the limit of their capabilities. 

In addition, supervisory and 
executive openings are filled 
from within the company. 
Many of the top executive 
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l)i Biyce Jordan has been elected 
president of the Washington Chapter 
oi the American Musicological Society. 

NO 1 1 s I ROM mi 
Dl PAR l\HM 01 MM ROBIOl <x,i 
Michael J. IVIc/ar. Jr.. Professor of 
Microbiology, has been elected a Coun- 
cilor to the national Society of Ameri- 
can Bacteriologists. I he Council, 
which administers the affairs ol the 
Society, convenes annually during the 
week of the Society's national meeting 
which will take place this year at St. 
Louis. Missouri. Maj 10-15. 

Raymond N. Doetsch. Associate Pro- 
fessor, and PhletUS P. Williams. Jr.. 
Graduate Assistant, Department of Mi- 
crobiology, presented a paper entitled 
"Microbial Dissimilation of a Unique 
Galactomannan" to the Washington 
Branch meeting of the Society of 
American Bacteriologists, held at Wal- 
ter Reed Army Medical Center. Febru- 
ary 24th. 

Raymond N. Doetsch. Associate Pro- 
fessor, Department of Microbiology, 
presented a paper entitled "Some As- 
pects of Rumen Microbiology" at the 
Mankind Chapter meeting of Sigma 
Xi on March 20th. Dr. Doetsch also 
presented a paper entitled "Polysacchar- 
ide Metabolism of Rumen Microorgan- 
isms" before the Ruminology Section 
of the isotope Conference at Oklahoma 
State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma, 
April 3rd. 

Raymond N. Doetsch. Phletus P. 
Williams, Jr., and Philip J. Provost, 
Graduate Assistant, Department of 
Microbiology, will present the follow- 
ing papers at the American Dairy 
Science Association meeting. Univer- 
sity of Illinois, Urbana. Illinois. June 
15-17. (1) "Galactomannanase Activity 
of Rumen Bacteria." (2) "Studies on 
Amylolysis in the Bovine Rumen." 



Department of 

AIR SCIENCE 



TWO COMPLETE COURSES 

Major Rudolph L. Mattson. '57, was 
graduated December 19 from the Asso- 
ciate Course given by the Army Com- 
mand and General Staff College at Fort 
Leavenworth. Kansas. Following grad- 
uation, he returned to Washington. 
D. C. where he is a Stall' Officer in the 
Office o\ the Deputj Chief of Staff 
at the Pentagon. 

Richard K. Preston. '58, recently 
completed the ten weeks' Officer Candi- 



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30 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



date Course at Quantico and was com 
missioned a Marine second lieutenant. 
He is now enrolled in the nine-month 
officers basic course, also al Quantico. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 
PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 

/. A. Daiker 




Douglas S. Steinberg 

HEADS NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 

Douglas S. Steinberg, '40, has been 
elected President of the National Con- 
fectioners Association. He has held the 
position of Assistant President since 
June, 1958. In his new position, Stein- 
berg is President of an association 
which has more than 500 confectionary 
manufacturers and suppliers, represent- 
ing approximately 85% of all the candy 
manufactured in the United States. 

Steinberg is a member of the Board 
of Regents of the Institute for Organ- 
ized Management and a member of the 
Board of Governors of the National 
Packaging Council. He holds mem- 
berships in the Washington Trade As- 
sociation Executives, National Press 
Club, American Society of Association 
Executives, and the National Associa- 
tion Executives Club. He is a member 
of Sigma Chi Fraternity, Omicron Delta 
Kappa and Pi Delta Epsilon. 

COMMISSIONED 

Conrad S. Malloy, '58, was recently 
.commissioned a Marine second lieuten- 
.ant, after completing the ten weeks 
Officer Candidate Course at Quantico. 

MARCH-APRIL. 1959 




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\l l MSI HKI \KI IS! 
si Ml I K HII Kin HOI I I . DAI LAS, ll\^ 

\ \cr\ successful alumni breakfast 
waa held at the St.aler Hilton Hotel in 
Dallas. Ie\as. on Tuesday N member 
II. I95S. Approximate^ 110 alumni 
and friends gathered together for this 

annual breakfast meeting. I his repre- 
sented a \er\ excellent turnout for a 
meeting held at such a great distance 

from the east coast. 

President Gail introduced the follow- 
ing members and guests at the head 

table: Dr. Ernest B. Nuttall, Dean 

Kenneth V Randolph, West Virginia 
University; Dean Nhron S. Aisenberg. 
University ol Maryland; Dean Frank 
J. Houghton, Loyola University; Dean 
I meritus J. Ben Robinson, Dr. Kath- 
erine Toomey, Dr. l.\nn L. Emmart. 
Dr. Lawrence W. Bimestefer, Dr. Ed- 
ward R. White. I rustee of the Fourth 
District of the ADA; Dr. George B. 
Clendenin, Dr. Daniel F. Lynch, Past 
President of the ADA. Dr. Eugene I.. 
Pessagno, Dr. Harr> W. DresseL Jr.. 
President-Elect of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 

Dr. Ciail welcomed the group on he- 
half of the Alumni Association and 
thanked them for coming at such an 
earls hour. He introduced the Presi- 
dent of the American Dental Associa- 
tion. Dr. William R. Alstadt. to sa\ a 
few words to the group. Dr. Alstadt was 
most impressed with the turnout and 
the spirit of our membership. He con- 
gratulated our Alumni Association for 
its success throughout the years and he 
felt that this breakfast meeting was 
most surprising to him because of the 
interest shown by our alumni mem- 
bers. He thanked Dr. Cappuccio, the 
secretary, tor helping him to secure a 
room. The room was accessary to Dr. 
Alstadt for a reception oi the Board of 
1 rustees oi the All \ 

Dr. McCarthy was introduced as the 
guest speaker ol the morning. He wel- 
comed the alumni and guests to the 
great State ol Texas. During his re- 
marks he explained some of the prob- 
lems ol housing as it was related to 
the convention. He introduced Mr. 
and Mrs. William Meek as guests oi 
the Association. Coach Meek is the 
head coach at Southern Methodist L'ni- 
\ersit\ and served at one time as a 




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32 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZIN 



former assistant coach at the Univei 
gjtj ol Maryland. Dean McCarthj 
thanked the entire group for the op- 
portunity to speak and he welcomed 
them .ill to visit the Baylor Dental 
School liming their stay in Dallas, 

1 BUS 

One of the high points of this break- 
fast meeting was the presence of the 
five deans who .no graduates of the 
Dental School, University of Maryland. 
Ihis distinction is unparalleled in 
schools of dentistry in this country. 

President Gail introduced the secre- 
tary, Dr. Joe Cappuccio, to make a few 
introductions and announcements. Dr. 
Cappuccio introduced the oldest grad- 
uate. Dr. Daniel N. dishing of the 
I lass of 1897. Dr. dishing is now re- 
siding in San Antonio. Texas. Among 
those introduced by the secretary were 
Dr. Marion McCrea, Associate Dean 
at the University of Minnesota; Mr. 
Glenn Millard. Mr. Joseph Welch. Dr. 
\ Mrs. Buckey Clemson, Monsignor 
Franczak, Regent at Seton Hall Uni- 
versity; Dr. & Mrs. Malcolm B. Bowers, 
Mis. Helen McCarthy. Dr. Gerard A. 
Devlin. Dr. & Mrs. Englander, Dr. & 
Mrs Eichenbaum. The largest ovation 
given to Lt. Col. Garnet P. Francis, 
who made the death march from 
Bataan. Capt. Joseph Scanlon, U. S. 
Navy, a former hockey player for the 
University of Maryland, was introduced 
to the group. Time did not permit to 
introduce all the illustrious alumni and 
guests in attendance. The secretary 
presented to Mrs. McCarthy and Mrs. 
Meek souvenir bracelets of the State of 
Mars land. These presentations were 
mementos to the wives of two dis- 
tinguished men who once were asso- 
ciated with the University of Maryland. 

The secretary made announcements 
regarding the triennial meeting to be 
held in conjunction with June Week, 
the adoption of a new constitution by 
the Association, the formation of an 
Alumni Section in Rhode Island, the 
activity of the New Jersey Alumni 
Section, the proposed West Virginia 
Alumni Section and the establishment 
of a new Alumni Journal, The Alma 
Mater, which will be published around 
February 1, 1959. He explained the 
mechanism of the Greater Alumni 
Fund Drive and how it affected the 
dental alumni. He congratulated those 
present for their interest and loyalty 
to their Alma Mater. 

Dr. Gail announced the party to be 
held that evening at the Statler Hilton 
Hotel. He welcomed the alumni and 
their guests to attend. He concluded 
his remarks by thanking all of those 

(Continued on next page) 



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34 




present and inviting them to attend the 
alumni breakfast in New York ( ity in 
1959 which is the ( entennial year ol 
the \merican Dental Association, rhus 

ended another milestone in the historv 
ol the oldest dental college in the 
uorld. 

\\ l MN1 WD '•( isis WHO Mil M>l I) 
I li.ll III \M MM BRI \KI \SI 

1910 Paul Jones. Farmville, N ( 

1914 J. Hen Robinson. Morgankmn. 

\\ \ a 

1915 lames H Ferguson, Jr., Balti- 

more, Md. 

1916 Wilbert Jackson. Clinton, N I 

1917 Fred J. Houghton. New Orleans. 

la 

1918 Edwin G. Gail, Baltimore. Md. 

I red Wertheimer. Lansing. Mich. 

1921 Louis M. (antor. New Haven, 

( onn. 
C. H. league, Greensboro. N < 

1922 M. S. Aisenberg. Baltimore. Md. 
John F. Clark. Baltimore. Md. 
Lynn Emmart, Baltimore. Md. 

1923 G. A. Devlin. Westlield. N. J. 
Harry V. McCarthy. Dallas, 

I exas. 

1925 E. M. Colvin, Washington. D. C. 
Daniel F. Lynch. Washington. 

D. C. 
Frank McCrystle. Baltimore, Md. 

1926 Michael Kozubski. Baltimore. 

Md. 
Fred E. Toulouse, Jr. and Mrs., 
Waterville. Me. 

1927 Albin W. Rauch and Mrs.. 

Orange. N. J. 

1928 A. Harry Ostrow and Mrs.. 

Washington. D. C. 

1929 G. B. Clendenin. Bethesda. Md. 

1930 Norman P. Chanaud and Mrs.. 

Centerville, Md. 

1931 Ernest P. Nuttall. Baltimore. 

Md. 

1932 Irving G. Abramson and Mrs.. 

Baltimore. Mil. 
J. J. Englander. Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

1933 Malcolm B. Bowers. Dallas. 

Texas. 

1934 L. W. Bimestefer, Dundalk. Md. 
C. Frank Sabatino. Plainfield, 

N. J. 

1935 J. H. Scanlon, Upland. Calif. 
193S James I. (abler. Snou Hill. Md, 

1939 Naomi A. Dunn. New Britain. 

(onn. 
Irving W. Eichenbaum. New 

Britain. Conn. 
Garnet P. Francis. Jr.. Fort Bliss. 

I exas. 
H. J. Hoffacker, Hanover, Pa. 
Max Miller. I os Angeles. Calif. 

1940 Kenneth V. Randolph. Morgan- 

town, W. Va. 



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Phone JOhnson 1-2727 

616 PORTLAND ST., S.E. 
WASHINGTON 20, D.C. 



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WASHINGTON 9. D.C. . 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



' 



I'M I 

1942 
1943 



1444 
l l >45 
1946 
1948 



Dr. Eugene Pessagno, Baltimore, 

Md. 
I red Aurbach, Wichita, Kan. 
^ n Schultheis, Baltimore, \M 
Stewart I verson and Mrs., 

I os Angeles, Calif. 
Vshei B Carey, Jr., Selbyville, 

Del 
Herb Krasner, Bloomfield, N. J. 
ge Graham, Miami. Floi ida. 
1 1. ii i j \\ Dressel, Baltimore, Md. 
J. P. Cappuccio, Baltimore, Md. 
David lewis. Wheaton, Md. 
lose r Medina and Mrs.. 

Baltimore, Md. 
Albert S. Vikell, Lexington Park. 

Md. 
I ugene R. Zimmerman. Dallas, 

I exas, 
A. Clyde Hannah, Salisbury, Md. 
Jack D. Robertson, Washington, 

D. C. 
Alvin P. Friend, Oakland, Md. 
R. H. Orrahood, Irving, Texas. 
Thomas Salimeno, Jr.. Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
John B. Gatewood. Dallas, Texas. 
Robert F. Mantz, Jr., Natchez, 

Miss. 
Nann Alix Wickwire, Tampa, 

Fla. 
Alfred E. Bees. Hampstead, Md. 
Paul R. Reiner. Abilene, Texas. 
Marvin L. Friedman, Fort Bliss, 

Texas. 
Wm. G. Buchanan, Foss, Okla- 
homa. 
R. F. Gherardi, Camp Lejeune. 

N. C. 
Jim Hager, Havelock, N. C. 
Gerald M. Isbell, Elgin, Fla. 
William R. Patterson, Fort 

Worth, Texas. 
Alvin R. Sayers, Fair Haven, Vt. 
Alfred H. Jansen, Jr., El Paso 
Texas. 

Philip P. Nolan, Key West, Fla. 
John S. Rushton, San Antonio, 
Texas. 



HONORED GUESTS ATTENDING EIGHTH 
ALUMNI BREAKFAST 

)r. W. R. Alstadt, Little Rock. Arkan- 
sas — President of the American 
Dental Association. 

)r. Edward R. White, Jersey City, 
New Jersey — Trustee of Fourth 
District of the American Dental 
Association. 

Lev. Msgr. V. Franczak, South Orange, 
New Jersey — Dean of Seton Hall 
University Dental School, South 
Orange, New Jersey. 

>r. Richard C. Leonard, Baltimore, 
Maryland — Honorary member of 
Alumni Association. 

(Continued on next page) 



[950 

1951 

1952 



1953 
1954 



955 
956 
957 



958 



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35 




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• 200 Baltimore Blvd. College Park, Md 



Dr Marion \s Md rea. Minneapolis 

Minn. Honarary member of 
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Dr. Katharine loonies. Baltimore. 
Maryland Honorary member of 
Alumni Association. 



College of 

EDUCATION 

Ii,n\ (t demon 



I'l HI K AIlONs 

\livs Evans Needs Help ssith Her 
Elementary-School Science leaching"' 
written bs Dr. (Jlenn O. Blough. Asso- 
ciate Professor ot Education, appeared 

in the N I A. Journal. November. 

I he Division of Adult Education 

Service, National Education Associa- 
tion, published two pamphlets entitled 
"Anything Familiar? — A Communits- 
School Dramatization Highlighting the 

Reasons Whs We Need Education 
about Education" written bj Dr. Jean 
D. Cirambs. The first is the plavscript 
and the other is the production and 
discussion guide. 

M. Clemens Johnson. Associate Pro- 
fessor in Education, and Frederick M. 
Lord. Educational Testing Service, col- 
laborated on an article entitled "An 
Empirical Study of the Stability of a 
Group Mean in Relation to the Distri- 
bution oi Test Items Among Students." 
Thi^ article appeared in the Summer. 
1958 issue of Educational and Psycho- 
logical Measurements. 

Dr. Johnson and Hazel Poole under 
the general direction of Herbert S. 
Conrad, Director. Research and Statis- 
tical Services Branch, conducted a sur- 
\e> of junior-year college students en- 
rolled in science and mathematics. This 
surve) is entitled "Junior-Year Science 
and Mathematics Students: Fall. 1957" 
and is published bs L. S. Department 
of Health. Education, and Welfare. 
Office of Education. 

Dr. Glads s A. Wiggin, Professor in 
Education, wrote "Guide Lines for the 
Adult Educator" which appears in the 
Autumn. 1958 issue oi the Adult 
Education. 

s|\ll MEMBERS PARTICIPATt: \I 
1 (H U Ml 1 riNGS 

John J Kurt/. Professor, Institute 
tor Child Studs, participated in the pro- 
gram of the National Conference on 

Fitness oi Secondars School Youth held 




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36 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



it iho Willard Hotel. Washington, D.C., 
December 7-12, 1958. "The t hanging 
Scene* 1 was the theme of the Second 
Qeneral Session .it winch Dr. Kurt/ 
>resented "Growth and Development ol 
he Adolescent in roday's (hanging 
Culture." He was a member of the 

-unci discussion "Implications of Cul- 

ural Developments for Secondary 
school Programs in the Areas of 
Health, Safety, Physical Education, 
•\thlctics. Recreation, Driver Educa- 
ion. and Outdoor Education." 

Dr. Norris Haring, coordinator ol 
ipecial education, was chairman of the 
norning session at the meeting of the 
,'ouncil for Exceptional Children which 
net at the Shoreham Hotel. Washing- 
on. D. C, December 26. 1958. The 
Mogram was centered on "Problems of 

hildren with learning Disabilities 
Resulting from Kmotional Disturbances, 
irain Injury, and Deafness." Among 
he other participants was Gertrude 
iistison. graduate fellow. University of 
Maryland. 

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

r\vo stall members of the Childhood 
Education Department have recently 
tublished materials for children. Lillian 
V. Brown, instructor in creative music 
or young children, has published 
hrough the Willis Publishing Com- 
>any in Cincinnati, original piano com- 
•ositions for beginners. James L. 
lymes. Jr., Chairman of the Depart- 
nent. has published through Row, 
'eterson and Company in Evanston, 
llinois a set of eight stories for kinder- 
:arten and first grade children known 
s the "Hymes Books to Start On." 

Barbara Glaser, a senior in Child- 
lood Education, has had an original 
ong for young children. "The Green 
Vog." included in the new Kinder- 
;arten book of the Birchard Music 
ieries. 

ALUMNI NEWS 

drs. Anne Welsh Guy. '48, wrote a 
elightful story entitled "The Reindeer 
■fystery" which appeared in the De- 
ember issue of The Instructor. Mrs. 
juv is now teaching second grade at 
tie Chevy Chase Elementary School. 
Ann Atkins, '58, is working with 
American Airlines as an airline hostess. 



THE AMERICAN IRON AND STEEL 

INSTITUTE ATTRACTED BY ACTIVITIES 

IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

he Industrial Education Department 
'as recently visited by representatives 
(Continued on next page) 



J. H. De VEAU & SON, Inc 



General Contractors 



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4100 Jones Bridge Road 

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Plutnbinq. and ctfecUiHia Seivice 

AA2A Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Washington, D. C. 
WOodley 6-7122 Day or Night, WOodley 6-5181 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO Inc. 


Link Belt Company 


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• "C-0-TW0" 


• Gas Masks. Canisters 


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Fire Extinguishers 


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C. LAwrence 6-1362 



HEATING WArfield 7-8538 

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distributed by 

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CHIP DISTRIBUTORS 

Rear— 1229 D St.. S.E. 

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IARCH-APR1L, 1959 



37 



Here is how to get 
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Many forms are needed 
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Baltimore Business Forms 

iD.. ...,>» of THE SAlTIMOIt SALESBOOK COMPANY! 

Phone Gilmor 5-8000 

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Charles F. Ellinger (Class of 1937) 



B. & B. 
EXTERMINATORS, INC. 

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TERMITE SPECIALISTS 

Phones: LExington 9-2140 — 9-2141 

626 NORTH CALVERT ST. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



King Bros.Jnc 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SArotoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
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MU. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

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Located in the Center of 
the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



ol the American Iron and Steel In- 
stitute. 1 he group was particularly in- 
terested in developments and procedures 
in the Department \uth respect to 
teaching iteelmaking and allied indus- 
trial subjects Concepts ol teac h i n g in- 
volving the group processes, experi- 
mentation, line production, and the 
unit method ot teaching were discussed 

\uth the Institute representatives. 

01 particular interest to the Iron 
and Steel Institute personnel was the 

extensive array ol tine models depicting 
steel producing units I he most recent 
ol these is a large model open hearth 
furnace which involves action as well 
as considerable electronic animation. 
\s a result ot the visit by the Iron 
and Steel personnel, a writer from 
Steelways Magazine visited the campus 
to write a feature article about the 
above items and activities. Pictures 
have been taken ol the activities and 
items used in the methods of teaching 
class. The Steelways Magazine is a 
publication of the American Iron and 
Steel Institute. 

THh INDUS! RJ \I 1 DLC AIION 

DEPARTMENT AND MONTGOMERY 

COUNTY COOPERATE IN AN 

ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT 

One of the most talked about programs 
in Industrial Arts is a joint Industrial 
Education and Montgomery County 
action research project currently being 
carried out in selected schools of the 
County. 

The project is entitled "Experimenta- 
tion in Industrial Arts" and involves 
having the students engage in various 
forms of research and experimentation 
with tools, materials, and processes. 
The project was first started in the 
Montgomery Hills Junior High School 
at the ninth grade level. A ninth grade 
section at Western Junior High School 
was next to enter the program. 

The pupils in these classes devise and 
design their own experiments. The 
activities and procedures are carried out 
in accordance with professional re- 
search techniques. Each boy or girl 
is participating in a study of his or her 
own choice and design. 

In each school the program has met 
with considerable success, interest and 
enthusiasm. 1 ape recordings of the 
activities have been made and applaud- 
ed bj leading educators in Industrial 
Education as well as the broad field of 
1 ducation. 

Mr. Alan Keen) is the teacher in 
charge of the Montgomery Hills pro- 
gram and Douglas 1 homas is the 
teacher in charge of the Western Junior 
High program. Both men have earned 



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38 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



ieii Master's degree .11 Maryland and 
h K^'in also received ins bachelor's 
egree from this institution 

\ PROJ ECT IN INDUSTRIA1 i in c \ i [ON 

ho iiuiusin.il Education Department 
as recentlj awarded a granl ol money 
i carrj oul .1 I .V research project in 
k- Department. 

I ho project is designed to explore the 
>plication ol the direct, camera-to- 
iceivei technique as an aid to the 
dividual teacher. Actuallj the proj- 
1 .urns .a determining \\a\s that ttio 
dividual instructor can use the media 

..n aid to improving his instruction. 

is not .1 mass communication project 
ul is concerned only with the activities 

viewing and instruction within a 
Ogle classroom. 

1 he project will be carried out in all 

the instructional areas of the Depart- 
ent in an attempt to explore its maxi- 
ma application and evaluate the in- 
! notional efficiency of the technique. 



IMMOND TO BE GUEST LECTURER IN 
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION SUMMER 
SESSION 

r. James J. Hammond. Director of 
e Industrial Arts Department, State 
;achers College. Fitchburg. Massa- 
mssets. will be a visiting lecturer in 
e Industrial Education program of 
mrses for the Summer Session, 1959. 
Mr. Hammond is one of the most 
cognized leaders in his field and was 
visiting lecturer in the Department 
it summer. Mr. Hammond received 
s B.S.E. degree from the State Teach- 
s College at Fitchburg and his M.Ed, 
gree from Harvard University. 

MALEY PARTICIPATES IN 
EDUCATIONAL MEETINGS 

r. Donald Maley, Professor and Head 

the Industrial Education Department 
s been participating in a number of 
ucational meetings and conferences. 
On November 19, Dr. Maley was the 
incipal speaker at a meeting of the 
dustrial Education teachers of Anne 

undel County. On this occasion he 
oke on "Recent Developments and 
ends in Industrial Arts." The speech 
is illustrated by tape recordings, 
xlels, and projected aids. 
On December 12, Dr. Maley spoke 

a meeting of the secondary school 
pervisors of Montgomery County. On 
is occasion Dr. Maley described and 
Jstrated some of the newer concepts 

Industrial Arts teaching and gave a 
tailed account of the action research 
(Continued on next page) 



There's a good reason why 

they call Cave Ford 

the Premium Ford Dealer 

Cave Ford's premium deals are becoming famous all 
over Washington. People are talking about I he value 
lhat Cave Ford j»ives (heir customers. And the Cave- 
Ford premium deal doesn't end wilh a sale. Your 
best bonus is the quality service and unfailing 
courtesy in every department at Cave Ford. And 
Cave Ford carries the full line of 1959 Fords . . . 
from the Custom to the Thunderbird. Whatever your 
price range, see Cave Ford for the "Premium Deal." 




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OLiver 6-8200 



RAY GAINS STEEL CO. 



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Insurance of all Kinds 

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kRCH-APRIL. 1959 



39 



Edward 
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I posted 
Foods, 



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PLUMBING & HEATING 
CONTRACTORS 

Repairs a Specialty 



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Kensington, Md. 




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Division of 
National Dairy Products Corp. 

For the "Best" in Dairy Products 

Buy Seoltesl 

ADams 2-101 1 



project currentlv underwav in the 
counts I his is a joint University of 
Maryland and Montgomery County 

effort Dr. Male] had exhibits of the 
work done in the program as well as 
numerous recordings ot pupil reaction 
to the activity. 

On Januarv 9 and 10. Dr Males 
participated in conterences and spoke 
at meeting! ill and around Fitchburg. 
Massachusetts Dr Males spoke at an 
assemb!) ot students at the State I each- 
ers College m Fitchburg. His topic 
dealt with the current action research 
program being cooperated in bv the 
Department at Maryland, and in the 
needed emphasis lor a modern program 
in Industrial Arts I ater the same day. 
Dr. Male) spoke before an Industrial 
Arts leadership group. 

The following da) he participated in 
conferences intended to la) the ground- 
work tor an intensive research project 
in the held of Industrial Arts 

On January 14. Dr. Males assisted 
h\ a group of seniors in Industrial Arts 
put on an audio-visual workshop for the 
teachers at the Adelphi Elementary 
School. In addition to getting experi- 
ence with a variet) oi projection de- 
vices, the teachers had Dr. Maley de- 
scribe and illustrate a number of differ- 
ent kinds of instructional materials. 

On January 16. Dr. Maley assisted 
b) Alan Keeny. Doug Thomas, and 
Roger Shanahan presented the topic. 
"A Forward Look in Industrial Educa- 
tion." The lecture featured tapes made 
in the current action research project 
being carried out in Montgomery 
County in cooperation with the Depart- 
ment. This presentation was made be- 
fore the Nu Chapter of Iota Lambda 
Sigma, national professional fraternity 
in Industrial Education. 



PHI KAPPA I'lll INITIATES 

Phi Kappa Phi is an Honor Societv ded- 
icated to the Lnitv and Democrac) oi 
Education and selects its membership 
from all fields oi universit) study. New- 
members are elected from all schools 
oi their respective universities and are 
chosen from the upper tenth of the 
graduating class. 

The following College of Education 
students were initiates at the 44th An- 
ual Initiation Banquet held January 15. 
1959: Jane A. Allender. Joan \ Al- 
lender, Grace V. (lark. Marie L. Dien- 
enmann, Patricia J. Favier, Charles J 
Hustelt. Jean I acev . Kathleen M. Lee, 
Richard A. Martin. Beverly J. May, 
Ruth A. Rauch. Sylvia D. Roof. Jeanne 
M. Wcirich and Anne F. Newman. 
graduating class of 1958. 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

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Hot Water Heat 

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40 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINI 



'ollege of 
ENGINEERING 

A . Bernard Eylet 



PROMOl I D 

Vi thin I 1 undvall, Jr.. '50, has been 
iromoted to Chief Engineer of the 
lerbert A. Wagner Electric Generating 
Station of the Consolidated Cias and 
Electric Co. of Baltimore. Maryland. 
Ik- Wagner station currently has two 
25,000 K. W. generators in operation. 
Robert I . Evans. '2 l >. was recently 
ppointed Chief of Division 36. Meas- 
irement and Testing, of the U. S. 
\itent Office in Washington. D. C. His 
ionic is in North Arlington. Virginia. 

BACK TO THE BOOKS 

lerbert E. Hunter. '57. recently re- 
eived his M.S. degree from the Aero- 

autic.il Department at the California 
nstitute of Technology. He is cur- 
ently a graduate assistant at Cal. Tech. 
nd plans to continue his studies lead- 
ig to the Ph.D. degree. 

John Theon, '57. was called to active 
utj as a second lieutenant in the Air 
"orce in May. 1958. He is currently 
rudying meteorology at Penn State 
Jniversity. Prior to entering the serv- 
:c he was employed as an engineer 

ith the Douglas Aircraft Co. in Santa 
lonica. California. 

William Haney, '57, and Harry Funk, 
57, both aeronautical engineering grad- 
ates are currently with Douglas Air- 
raft in Santa Monica, California. 



SERVICE NEWS 

lajor Lawrence J. Hodgins. Jr., '41 
X E., is completing a three year tour 
t the Pentagon, where he is Staff 
)fficer. Missile Section. Weapons Sys- 
:m Branch. Technical Training Divi- 
ton. He is currently making his home 
i North Springfield, Virginia. Second 
eutenant G. H. Timmerman, '57 M.E., 
i currently serving with the U. S. Air 
orce at Amarillo Air Base, Texas, as 
Mechanical Design Engineer. 

RECOMMENDED FOR AWARD 

"urner G. Timberlake. '41 M.E., is 
ne of four outstanding Army civilian 
mployees who have been recom- 
lended by Secretary of Army Brucker 
ar the Seventh Annual Rockefeller 
ublic Service Award. Mr. Timber- 
ike joined the U. S. Army Engineer 
(Continued on next page) 

ARCH-APRIL. 1959 





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John M. Conroy 




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1730 L Street 
(Two doors west of Conn. Ave.) 
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Open til AWmghf — Sunday 'til 10 p.m. 






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alumni of the 
LLn.Ltjexi.ihi or 
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LUSTinE niCHOison 

Gltevialzt 
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<P&£ Xushltu. . . . 
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Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 



NORTH WASHINGTON 
PRESS 

Inc. 

H < Specialize in Printing 
for Churches and Schools 

849 Upshur St., N. W. 

WASHINGTON 11, D. C. 

TAylor 9-3932 



American Disinfectant Co. 




Pesf Control Service 




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Washington 1. D. C. NAtionol 8-6478 





Research and Development Laborator- 
ies, fort Belvoir, \ irginia. in 1956. In 
his capactt) as C hiet of the Mechanical 

neering Department at the Labora- 
tories he has been instrumental in the 
development ot new tractor equipment. 




Hurry li . Eumont, Jr. 
I I \1()\ i in Di \\ | 1 \M) ULM1 

Harrj W. Eumont, Jr.. B.S.Ch.E. '52, 
has loined the Dewej and Almy Chemi- 
cal Di\ision. W. R. Grace & Co., 
Cambridge. Massachusetts, as sales rep- 
resentative for can sealing compounds. 
He was formerly with Victor Chemical 
Works. Chicago, and Amoco Chemicals 
Corporation. Chicago. 

NOTES 

Thomas R E\ans. '54 E.E.. is cur- 
rentb with Jansk\ <.V Baile\. Inc.. Radio 
and Electronic Engineers, as a research 
and development engineer in Antenna 
Development and Design. 

Da\id K. Winslow, '43 E.E.. is As- 
sistant Plant Superintendent of the In- 
dian River Station of the Delaware 
Power and Light Co. He is making his 
home in Millsboro. Delaware. 

SMITH ELECTED 
TO BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

John W. Smith. B.S.C.E. '21, President 
of the Seaboard Air Line Company, 
was recently elected to the Board of 
Directors of the State-Planters Bank of 
Commerce and 1 rusts. Richmond. Vir- 
ginia. 

Mr. Smith's career at the Seaboard 
Air 1 ine Railroad Company began in 
1924 when he joined the compan) as 
engineering inspector of construction 
work. He became Division Engineer in 



VICTOR 

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& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

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Office and Warehouse 

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LAMAR & WALLACE 

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McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

Land Planning and Subdivision 

6480 SLIGO MILL ROAD 

TAKOMA PARK, MD. 
Telephone: JUniper 9-7508 



42 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZIN 



932 and waa Assistant ( hid Engineer 
iui Assistant General Superintendent 
om 194446. From 1946-50 he served 
v Assistant to ifK- President and was 
ice President from 1950-52. He w.in 
lected President in 1952. 
Mr. Smith also serves as .» director 
m several othei southern railroad com- 
anies. He is .i member ol the Ameri- 
m Railway Engineering Association 
ikI ot the American Association ot 
ailroad Superintendents, the New- 
smen Society ol I ngland in North 
jnerica and the National Defense 
ransportation Association. 

I'KU 1 II IN(. I W\ 

tonald F. Clements, '50, has been 
allied a license to practice law in 
InKMs He is a graduate of the John 
[arshall Law School. 

i OMMISSIONED 

[elvin E. Schwarz, '58, and Robert E. 

urns. '57. were recently commissioned 
s second lieutenants in the United 
Liies Marines. 



^allege of 

iOME ECONOMICS 

Rosa Lee Kime 



MISS BEHREND PARTICIPATES 
IN CLINICAL CONGRESS 
F AMERICAN COLLEGE OF SURGEONS 

rna Mae Behrend. '35. Nutritionist at 
.. D. Williams Memorial Clinics, Medi- 
il College of Virginia at Richmond, 
articipated in a panel presentation in 
le Gynecology and Obstetrics section 
: the 44th Annual Clinical Congress of 
merican College of Surgeons held in 
hicago in October. She also took part 
i a series of demonstrations for car- 
lac housewives sponsored by the 
ichmond area of American Heart 
ssociations this winter. 

MARYLAND HOME ECONOMICS 
\SSOCIATION HOLDS SPRING MEETING 

n March 13 and 14 the spring meet- 
ig of Maryland Home Economics As- 
>ciation was held in Hagerstown, 
laryland. Local arrangements Chair- 
ian. Mrs. Betty Schmidt Coss, '53, re- 
arts that the program will commem- 
"ate the 50th Anniversary of Ameri- 
m Home Economics Association at a 
>ecial Anniversary luncheon on March 
+th. 



PLEASANT COUNTRY EATING 



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BIO RAMO DRUG COMPANY 

325 W. BALTIMORE ST. BALTIMORE. MD. 

Manufacturers of 

QUALITY PHARMACEUTICALS. INJECTIBLES, 

TABLETS AND OINTMENTS 



PENINSULA POULTRY DISTRIBUTORS, Inc. 




Eviscerated Poultry 
Western Turkeys 



Cornish Game Hem 
Beltsville Turkeys 



Call— ANDREW BLASCO— Plaza 2-0287 



221 S. Howard Street 



Baltimore 1, Md. 



ARCH-APRIL. 1959 



43 



.iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiii; 



^(^r 



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BLACK/ £ 5, 

1217 - 22nd STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



@SS SS8S® -<~<-<~t~^ 

ZJhe Shade Shop 

and AFFILIATED PRODUCTS 

2214 M Street, N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

FEderal 7-1200 



Manufacturers and Distributors 

if Window Shades 

if Venetian Blinds 

if Folding Doors 

if Draperies and Rods 

•fc Screens 

if Inside Shutters 

if Porch Shades 

•if Vertical Blinds 

if Decorative Wood Coverings 



,-^ ^.^^^^^^^^^^^i,. 



L^ochlails 



oLJinn 



en 




Elmer Rigby's 
Taylor House 

Facilities for Private Parties 
TAYLOR AVENUE AT 
LOCH RAVEN BLVD. VALLEY 3-6252 

Baltimore, Md. 
(PLEASANT PLAINS SHOPPING CENTER) 
CLASS '43 




By S\l I -i I M5IN OGDEN 

I he approach of spring and the wel- 
come appearance of the crocus, daf- 
fodil and the robin, makes for happi- 
ness alter the long cold winter months. 
It brings us closer to I he Hunt, the 
Preakness. The Eastern Open and many 
other Maryland spring events, as we go 
into this joyous season of the year. 

All of the pleasures we look forward 
to during this spring season are coupled 
with household musts including home 
decorating, house cleaning and the 
preparation of the soil for early planting 
of gardens. 

We called on The CARPET CEN- 
TER of 8612 Georgia Avenue, Silver 
Spring. Maryland, and talked to Mr. 
David Davis, owner of the firm, to 
check on Carpet and Rug hints for 
decorating. 

Mr. Davis' hobby is riding and show- 
ing of fine horses, and of course, the 
springtime finds his schedule filled with 
engagements but his business comes first 
and he, with his capable staff, and 25 
years of experience, can plan for the 
most exacting homemaker or executive 
in creating the proper effect in color 
and design. 

These capable people use real 
artistry in planning where colors are to 
be blended with furniture and interior 
decorating, and clients are happy with 
the recommendations of the firm. 
Knowing that a living room should do 
many things for a family or their guests 



PRINCt GEOftSB PIN&5T MEN'5 WEAR JTORE 



Botany "500" and Hyde Park Clothes 

Dobbs Hats - Boston'ian Shoes 

6033 Baltimore Blvd. (between Riverdale and Hyattsville) 

UNion 4-1312 



4?<M 



Mcbtodcuu 



these experts will make that room 
place ol welcome charm. 

With many ways of approaching 
decorating problem, these skilled pe 
sons will take a color, any color that 
customer loves, and stay with it. The 
stock includes such famous brand namt 
in rugs and carpeting as Gulistan. Arch 
bold Holmes. Wonder Weave, Maget 
Philadelphia Carpet Company, Hare 
wick-Magee. Firth and many other 
and from these a customer can fin 
the right carpeting for any room. 

Mr. Davis is a well known figure i 
the greater Washington area and is 
tive in civic alfairs in Silver Spring 



Many spring social functions hav 
been planned and THE CASUAL CA 
TERING SERVICE. 7651 Old George 
town Road. Bethesda. Maryland, i 
equipped to handle any of them whethe 
they be small or large. John am 
Martha Chambers are the owners am 
operators of this fine firm. 

Mr. Chambers studied Commercia 
Art at the Maryland Institute of Art it 
Baltimore and was engaged in that busi 
ness for a number of years. Durim 
World War II he became permanenll' 
injured and after many month-> it 
Government hospitals, he was able b 
again go back into his profession. 

AVIGNONE FRERES 



Town and Country 



Caterers for 
Luncheons - Teas - Dinners 



Weddinp & Cocktail Reception- , 




Candy and Other Delicacies 
Gift Packages and Baskets 
Shipped all over the World 



Restaurant 

Luncheons - Dinners 
At Reasonable Prices 

1777 COLUMBIA ROAD, N.W. j 

Columbia 5-0332 Washington, D. C. E 



44 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



/, 



atnen 



In 1951 he met with another bit of 
misfortune and was seriously injured 
n an automobile accident. This injury 
meant that be had to give up his com- 
mercial art and get into a new field ol 
work. He and his wife, who is an 
sxcellent cook, decided to go into the 
ielicatessen and catering business. I he) 
worked with a Colorado Delicatessen 
5nn tor a while then opened their own 
tusiness at the Georgetown address. 

Mr. Chambers, with his artistic 
ibility. is capable of carrying out table 
.iecorations in colors to correspond with 
he decor of a room. He does not use 
icav\ glazes to garnish his dishes. All 
garnishes are edible and he selects un- 
usual foods that are out of season for 
[his purpose. 

One of the eye-catching fetes of Mr. 
Chambers is to have hams and turkeys 
completely cut up in small slices for 
^LT\ing. then replacing with an outer 
;kin to give the effect of the whole ham 
M turkey as it rests on a silver platter. 
The host need only to lift the skin pro- 
tection and presto, it's all ready to 
>erve. 

The name "CASUAL" didn't just 
lappen. So many of The Chambers' 



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MEMBER ABAA 
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MARYLAND BOOKS - SCHOLARLY BOOKS 

805 N. HOWARD ST. 
Baltimore 1, Md. 
ALLEN W. SCHULTZ 



CATERING 

---With A SPECIAL Touch 

Party Perk-ups for Any Occasion or 
Fully Serviced Affairs 



COCKTAIL PARTIES 



OPEN HOUSE 



RECEPTIONS 



BUFFETS 



TEAS • PICNICS • BANQUETS / 



LUNCHEONS 




the GatAtal Gat&ii*t<f, service 

7651 Old Georgetown Road BETHESDA, MD. 

OLiver6-l533-4 



customers were happy with the casual 
way in which their parties were catered 
and commented upon it so frequently, 
that the firm adopted the name 
"Casual." 

One can order anything from Party 
Perk-ups for any occasion, to fully 
serviced affairs and be assured that 
every little detail will be carried out to 
perfection. Cocktail parties, teas, re- 
ceptions, open house, buffets, banquets, 
picnics or luncheons need be no prob- 
lem, as a call to Casual will be all it 
takes to answer all of your party 
problems. 

If you are preparing your own party 
and want a fine dessert, arrange to get 
a Near East pastry variety from Casual. 
The Bakalavia (Pistachio and honey), 
Bourma (Sesame and honey), or 
Kaioil (coconut and honey) are de- 
liciously different and your guests will 
be delighted with your selection. 



SALISBURY RUG COMPANY 



700 N. SALISBURY BLVD. 

Phone PI 2-1129 




SALISBURY, MD. 



RUGS PICKED UP 
CLEANED AND STORED 

Complete Carpet Service 
Repairs — Alterations 




Cleaning of 
Oriental and 
Domestic Rugs 



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MARYLAND Magazine 



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MANO SWARTZ 
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from vplW 



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t- 



UARCH-APR1L. 1959 



45 



tf-OA. 



ManAflatwl It/osnesi 



Everyone with .1 large or sm.ill 
garden is anxious to be out working in 
ii at th^ time ol year. I ceding the 
soil, and proper cultivation, during the 
early spring, means beautiful gardens 
all summer long With the man) new 
products on the market for the profes- 
sional and amateur gardener, we called 
on .1 well known firm lor some expert 
advice 

Mr A I. Witcher, manager ol the 

BA1 riMORE IORO ( OMP \S"i 
2205 \ ast Joppa Road, Baltimore, had 
a read) answer to all ol our questions. 
Baltimore 1 010 Company, organized 

in 1949, is a complete lawn, golt equip- 
ment and garden suppK house, and Mr. 
Witcher together with his assistant. Mr. 
B. W. Bornhorn, Jr.. and the owner of 
the tirm. II. Gustin, are on hand to 
assist their customers with all garden 
problems and have the necessar) equip- 
ment to do the job. 



VISIT 
Bernie Lee's 

PEN1N HOTEL 

(Newly renovated) 

OPEN' DAILY 8 a.m. — 2 a.m. 
serving 

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DINNER 

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One outstanding item which has 
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I oro's Research and Development 
( enter comes a dramatic new principle 
ol grass cutting! ' W ind- 1 unnel" mow- 
ing -a principle so advanced that it 
obsoletes all other rotar) mowers. Over 
three years ol research and experimen- 
tation were spent on the housing alone, 
and alter countless tests, the optimum 
ol rotar) moving was reached. A full- 
cycle expanding wind-tunnel under the 
housing creates a superpower! ul vacu- 
um that "freezes" e\er> blade of grass 
upright for a crisp, clean cut. I his 
new cutting principle gives the Toro 
Whirlwinds for "59 the distinction of 
being the only rotary mowers that are 
specifically built to give you three- 
season use. You can now effectheh 
bag clippings, leaves, litter. Cleans up 
the >ard in the spring, bags clippings 
in the summer, bags or mulches leaves 
in the fall. Yet. these new Whirlwinds 
are only a part of Toro*s *59 line. 

In addition, they have a most com- 
plete line of power mowers and other 
quality-built grounds maintenance ma- 
chines. 

Mr. Witcher is an active member of 
the Loch Raven Kiwanis Club. National 
Ciarden Association, and National Golf 
Course Superintendents Association. 



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4(5 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



School of 
LAW 



Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



ELECTED TO NEAn YORK 

SI I'KI Ml I 01 Kl 

Bernard S. Meyei was recent]) elected 
.1 Justice of the New York State 
Supreme Court. He was elected to this 
Inch post In both major parties in New 

\ oik's I euth Judicial District. 

He is a graduate of the Johns Hop 
kins l niversit) and was graduated with 
ttonors from the University of Mary- 
land School of Law. As a student he 
served as chairman of the student edi- 
torial hoard of the Maryland Law Re- 
Prior to his nomination. Mr. 
Meyer was senior partner of a Manhat- 
tan law firm and Chairman of the Nas- 
sau Democratic County Committee. 

During World War II. he received 
i Presidential Unit Citation and a per- 
iOnal commendation from Admiral 
William Halsey for his service as an in- 
elligence officer aboard the aircraft 
.arrier Hornet. 

He is the author of several articles 
"or leading law journals including the 
Maryland Law Review. 

APPOINTED TO FEDERAL SERVICE 

-larold H. Balser. '57. and George T. 
. anaras. '55. are recent appointees to 
he Social Security Administration, 
Baltimore Pavment Center. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



MULVANEY APPOINTED 
DEPUTY DIRECTOR 

n the event of a disaster, the work of 
he Newark, New Jersey, Civil Defense 
imergency Medical Service will be 
remendous in scope. To provide in- 
leased direction of these services from 
he Civil Defense Control Center, Dr. 
-udvvig L. Simon, Director, recently 
innounced the appointment of Dr. 
Robert B. J. Mulvaney to the position 
)f Deputy Director. 

Dr. Mulvaney resides at 25 Long- 
ellovv Avenue. Newark. He is a merri- 
er of the 1958 graduating class of 
he School of Medicine. Presently he is 
)n the intern staff of the H. S. Martland 
Vledical Center. 

(Continued on next page) 

•1ARCH-APRIL. 1959 



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awarded a Master ol Science degree in 
neurolog) by the i niversity ol Minne- 

Sl>t.l 



GOl DSMI 1 11 ( OMP1 ins < <>i ksi 

Recentl) graduated trom the Walter 
Reed Armj Medical ( enter's graduate 
training program was (apt. Ralph S 
Goldsmith ol Baltimore. He is one ol 

17 doctors completing training this 
year. He will be assigned to the Army 

Institute ol Research located at the 
center. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

Making reference to the necessity of 
having a healthy population it a civili- 
zation is to thrive, the Dean of the 
University's Medical School, Dr. Wil- 
liam S. Stone, opens the Annual Report 
of the School of Medicine for the 
1957-58 year. 

Continuing his report with a few 
general observations. Dr. Stone notes 
that the 20th century has seen com- 
municable diseases reduced to a place 
of secondary importance as a cause of 
morbidity and death. 

Of those persons whose profession it 
is to safeguard our nation's health. Dr. 
Stone estimates that 509? of the grad- 
uating physicians become general prac- 
titioners. The other 509$ are involved 
in medical specialties, teaching, and 
research. For all of them the road to 
independent practice is long and costly. 

1 he School of Medicine is selective 
in its choice of students, as it must be 
to retain the present standard of quali- 
fied graduates. Some interesting sta- 
tistics indicate the degree of care in- 
volved in this selection. The seniors in 
the 1957-58 year numbered 78; there 
were 85 juniors. 98 sophomores, and 
4 1 freshmen. The 91 freshmen who 
entered the School of Medicine in the 
fall of 1957 were selected by a number 
of processes from a total of 1.803 re- 
quests received by the Admissions 
Committee. 

Maryland residents were given pri- 
mary consideration. 

The Dean's report concludes with 
statements regarding the School's cur- 
riculum, research, buildings, and fac- 
ulty. 

According to the report, there have 
been no important changes in the cur- 
riculum since the 1956-57 report. Stu- 
dies are in progress on improving inte- 
gration oi basic ami clinical sciences. 




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48 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



["here arc present)) in operation 140 
irch grants helping to make pos 
sible the basic research and clinical in- 
vestigation in progress in ever) depart- 
ment, ro quote l>r. Stone: "The 
amount, complexity, and the balance 
in various areas ol investigation will 
be found to be well above the average 
fOJ all the medical schools ol the 
i nited States." 

Construction of the Medical Sciences 

1 ibrarj and the remodeling of the Uni- 
versit) Hospital continues. 

I here have been two key appoint- 
ments among the faculty. Dr. George 
Entwisle was appointed Head of the 
Department of Preventive Medicine 
and Rehabilitation and Dr. Paul F. 
Richardson assumed the duties of Head 
of the Division of Physical Medicine 
and Rehabilitation. 



ALUMNI DAY, REUNIONS PLANNED BY 
THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Alumni Day tor the School of Medicine 
will be June 4 this year. To be held at 
Chemical Hall, the morning will wit- 
ness a social hour from 9 to 10 and 
a scientific session, presented by the 
class of 1934. from 10 to 11 a.m. From 
11 a.m. to 12 noon, a business session 
is scheduled. 

Luncheon is planned for 12:30 at 
University Hospital. Following lunch- 
eon, the rest of the afternoon will be 
devoted to class reunions. 

The Lord Baltimore Hotel will be the 
scene, in the evening, of a banquet to 
be held for the alumni. 



ALUMNI PRESIDENT APPOINTS 
REUNION CAPTAINS 

Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Jr., President 
of the Medical Alumni Association, has 
announced the appointment of class 
captains who will be asked to assume 
responsibility for their individual class 
reunions. 

This year the following decade and 
5-year classes will celebrate a reunion. 
The classes are listed below with the 
name of the class captain: 

1909— Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Sr. 

1914— Dr. Austin Wood 

1919— Dr. Wetherbee Fort 

1924— Dr. Clewell Howell 

1929 — Dr. Walter Anderson 

1934— Dr. W. L. Fearing 

1939 — Dr. Raymond Cunningham 

1944— Dr. W. Carl Ebeling 

1949— Dr. Edmond B. Middleton 

1954— Dr. Robert E. Yim 

Members of the respective classes 
noted above are urged to contact their 
(Continued on next page) 




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class captain .ts soon as possible con- 
cerning developments relating to their 
individual reunion. 

Kl I NION Al SOI I HI UN Ml DH U 

Mill [NG * SUCCESS 

DR. ( Al BAR OROl INO 

HI \Ds \l I MM OATH1 RING 

More than 75 alumni wives ami friends 

ol the School ot Medicine gathered at 
the Hotel Roosevelt, November 4 to 
participate in the University ol Mary- 
land, School of Medicine annual South- 
ern Medical Association reunion. 

I nder the capable leadership of Dr. 
Caesar Orofino, a fine bullet was pro- 
\ided. preceded by a cocktail hour. 
Uriel addresses were given by Dr. 
Harr\ M. Robinson. Jr.. President. 
Medical Alumni Association, and Dr. 
John A. Wagner. Editor ot the Bulletin. 
ol the School ol Medicine. 

MRS. SCOT1 Kl SIGNS ALUMNI POST 

Mrs. M incite E. Scott for many years 
Executive Secretary of the Medical 
Alumni Association resigned October 
I. Her place is being temporarily 
taken by Mrs. Bernice Broccoli, whose 
husband is currently a student in the 
School of Medicine. 



School of 

NURSING 



Lillie M. Largey 



NOTES FROM THE ALUMNAE 

Mrs. Dorothy McClure Keller. "56, her 
husband, and small daughter. Christine 
Ann are living in Nevada. Captain Kel- 
ler is stationed at Nellis Air Force Base. 

Mrs. Nancy Franklin Hartsock and 
famil) have now returned from Hawaii, 
where Major Hartsock was previously 
stationed, and are living at 5734-B 
Dalton Street. Fort Knox, Kentucky. 
Mrs. Hartsock was a graduate of the 
class oi 1947. 

It. and Mrs. James R. Stevenson, 
and their young daughter. Elizabeth 
Ann (Beth) are living at the following 
address: A O 3006116. 78th Tactical 
Fighter Squadron. APO 126, New 
York. N. Y. Mrs. Stevenson is a member 
ol the class of 1957. 

Mrs. Doris Rutherford Hekman. '56, 
is currently employed at Coronado Hos- 
pital in the convalescent division and 
the home for the aged. She adds. "The 
nursing care given here is ideal and it 
is ,i pleasure to be a part in giving 
this care." 



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MODERN 

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17 S. CHARLES ST. MU 5-4377 

BALTIMORE 

Serving this area rince 1919 



Kefauver Lumber 
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BUILDING SUPPLIES 

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Bel Air Yds. - phone 1 777 - Bel Air, Md. 

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General Insurance 

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Day and Evening 

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Baltimore, Md. 



50 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



I I I \1 (il IN I I Kl si 

Miss i arol Hosfeld, '50, who is pus 
entlj Assistant Professoi ol Medical 
and Surgical Nursing >n the Uni- 
versit} ol Maryland School of Nursing 
spoke .ii the annual Cancel Seminar 
ol the State oi Maryland, ["he meet- 
ing was held in November of 1958, and 
sponsored by the American Cancel 
Societj and the Maryland state Nurses 
Association. Miss Hosfeld, as a mem 
her of .i panel with other prominent 
physicians and nurses of Maryland, 
discussed "Care of The Surgical Can- 
cer Patient." 



School of 
PHARMACY 



Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 




Warren E. Crispens 

CRISPENS REJOINS ELI LILLY 

Varren E. Crispens has rejoined Eli 
Jlly and Co. as a representative in 
'ortsmouth, Virginia, with a territory 
Deluding parts of southeastern Virginia 
nd northeastern North Carolina. He 
rst joined Lilly in 1955 as a repre- 
entative in Portsmouth. He resigned in 
957 to enter the retail drug business 
1 Greensboro, North Carolina. 

Mr. Crispens received his Bachelor 
f Science degree in pharmacy from 
le University in 1951. In 1952 he 
ecame a registered pharmacist in 
laryland and North Carolina. He is a 
lember of Phi Delta Chi, professional 
harmacy fraternity. 

ITEMS 

>r. Mario Aceto who completed the 
(Continued on next page) 

IARCH-APRIL. 1959 



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requirements lor the Master ol Science 
degree with a major in pharmacology 
in the School ol Pharmacy in June. 
1955. and who later completed the re- 
quirements tor the Doctor ol Philoso- 
phy degree with a major in pharma- 
cology at the University oi Connecti- 
cut in 1 1 > 5 -s . joined the stall ol the L'ni- 
\eisit\ ol Pittsburgh School ol Phar- 
macy as Instructor in Pharmacy in Sep- 
tember, 1958. 

Mr. Morris M (nail, an endocrinol- 
ogist at the National Service (enter 
lor ( hemotherapy, was the guest speak- 
er at the Pharmaceutical ( hemistry Col- 
loquium held on January X. 1 he title 
ol his talk \«.as "Physiological Aspects 
of Certain Steroids." He announced 
that some synthetic steroids have shoun 
biological activity as much as 3.000 
times that of the natural hormones used 
as standards. He expressed the belief 
that an answer to the cancer problem 
may be found in some new synthetic 
steroid. Based on this belief, the Na- 
tional Service Center has established an 
endocrinology section to handle the 
screening of new steroids against 
cancer. 

Dean Noel E. Foss, Dr. L. Costello. 
Assistant Professor of Zoology, and 
Mr. Nagin Patel. Instructor in Phar- 
macy attended the national meeting of 
the American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science which was held 
in Washington, D. C. during the 
Christmas holiday. 



College of 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
RECREATION and 
HEALTH 

Dr. Lester M. Fraley 
AT ANNUAL MEETING 

Attending the Annual College Physical 
Education Association Meeting, held in 
New York City December 28th to 30th, 
from the College of Physical Educa- 
tion. Recreation, and Health, were Dr. 
Burris F. Husman. Dr. Marvin Eyier, 
and Mr. Richard Klima. Dr. Husman 
presented a paper entitled. "The Physi- 
cal Education Stall and In-Service 
Training." 

DR. MOHR AT FORUM 

Dr. Dorothy R. Mohr. Professor of 
Physical Education, attended the an- 
nual meeting of the Women's National 
Aquatic Forum in Hollywood, Florida. 
December 23-30. at which meeting she 
served as Chairman of one of the ses- 



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52 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



sions and attended meetings ol the 
I Kecutive Board ol which she is a 
membei in the capacity oi Research 
Chairman. 

On February 3, 1959, Dr. Mohr was 
.1 member oi a panel for the meeting 
ol elementary physical education teach- 
ers m Baltimore, speaking on testing in 
the elementarj school physical educa- 
tion program. 

I R] I M \N IN Nl \Y YORK 

Mr Harold W. Freeman attended the 
National Soccer Coaches and Officials 

meeting in New York on January 15, 
16, and 17. As an Assistant Professor 
in the Department of Physical Educa- 
tion for Men. he instructs the Physi- 
cal 1 lucation majors in their course 
in soccer. As a local official, he is 
President and Kxaminer of the D. C. 
Soccer Referees Association. The meet- 
ings consisted of films, discussions of 
the World Cup games; modern trends; 
the Florida Forum; the form and sta- 
ture of clinics; rules and interpreta- 
tions meetings; and other panels on re- 
lated subjects. At the Saturday noon 
luncheon, activities were climaxed by 
the All America team presentations. 
Dr. James Creese, President of Drexel 
Institute of Technology, Philadelphia, 
gave an inspiring message at this meet- 
ing. 

DR. DEACH SPEAKS 

Dr. Dorothy F. Deach, Head of the 
Department of Physical Education for 
Women, spoke on contributions of re- 
search to curriculum development at a 
meeting of elementary physical educa- 
tion teachers in Baltimore on February 
3. 

DANCE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 

Miss Dorothy Madden, Chairman of 
the Dance Curriculum, was a delegate 
to the Third National Conference on 
Exchange of Persons, January 28-31, 
1959. The topic for the meeting was 
"World Progress Through Education 
Exchange." 

Miss Madden also attended the Na- 
tional Convention of the American As- 
sociation of School Administrators 
held in Atlantic City February 15-19. 
She was in charge of a meeting dis- 
cussing dance and related arts. The 
general purpose of the convention was 
to present the importance of the Crea- 
tive Arts in the Educational program. 
The University of Maryland Dance 
Demonstration Group was a part of the 
presentation of the materials. 

The University Dance Demonstra- 
tion Group has presented three pro- 
grams this year, illustrating the train- 
(Continued on next page) 



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53 



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ing ol a dancer, and what goes into the 
making of a dance. The group per- 
formed lor the General classes of the 
University Physical Education program, 
.it Western Junior High School, and at 
Salisbury State Teachers' College. Per- 
formance at Salisbury is to become 
an annual event lor the group at the 
request ol the Teachers' College. 

ARIIi II PI Kl 1SIII I) 

lii the March issue of the Physical Edu- 
cator published by the Phi Epsilon 
Kappa, a professional fraternity in 

physical education, appears an article 
prepared by Dr. Hurris F. Husman and 
Dr. Dorothy Dcach. entitled. "The 
Prevention of Attacks on Required 
Physical Education Programs." 

DR. M ASM V A( I IVI 

Dr. Massey, Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation, recently participated in the Na- 
tional Conference on Fitness for Sec- 
ondary School Youth, held December 
7-10 in Washington, D. C. He also at- 
tended the Executive Council meeting 
of the American College of Sports 
Medicine which was held in New York 
City January 23. Dr. Massey is Past 
Vice-President of this organization and 
currently a member of the Board of 
Trustees. In April, he will attend and 
present a paper at the Eastern District 
Convention of the American Associa- 
tion for Health and Physical Educa- 
tion, which is convening in Atlantic 
City. 

WEIGHT LIFTING BECOMING POPULAR 

The Olympic Barbell Club of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, now in its second 
year of competition, is available to 
schools and other interested organiza- 
tions for demonstrations of lifting and/ 
or training. This activity has a history 
of proving valuable to both the athlete 
and non-athlete if properly performed. 
One of the club"s major purposes is to 
help to spread this knowledge. Mini- 
mum expenses involved in getting to 
and from a sponsor are requested. Con- 
tact Mr. H. W. Freeman, Advisor- 
Coach. College of Physical Education. 
Recreation. & Health. University of 
Maryland, College Park. Maryland. 

Miss kl SLUR AT CONVENTION 

Miss Ethel Kesler of the Department 
of Physical Education for Women, at- 
tended the Nat ion. il Convention of the 
Athletic and Recreation Federation of 
College Women March 25-28 at Ore- 
gon State College, Corvallis, Oregon. 
She was accompanied by four student 
leader^ ol Maryland's Women's Recrea- 
tion Association 



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54 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Miss Kesler conducted a Bpeedball 
clinic for the teachers in the Baltimore 
schools m September and one in zone 
defense in basketball in December for 
the same group. Students enrolled in 
the course techniques ol Sports as 
sisted in the lattei 

si \l I li> \l 1 1 ND i ON\ 1 N I ION 

si. ill Members ol the College ol I'lnsi- 
cal Education, Recreation, and Health, 

who "ill attend the National (omen 

non ol the Vmerican Association for 
Health. Physical Education, and Rec- 
i cat ion in Portland, Oregon March 28 
io \pril 2. arc Dean Lester M. Fralcy, 
Dr. Dorothj Deach, Dr. James Hum- 
phrey Dr. Warren R. Johnson. Dr. 
Doroth) Mohr. and Miss Ethel Kesler. 
\t this com ention. Dr. Mohr will at- 
tend the meetings of the National Re- 
search Council and will be a speaker 
tor the Section on History and Philo- 
sophy of Physical Education. The topic 
of her speech is "Inter-action is a 
Group Process," which is one of four 
talks related to the topic of '"Movement, 
Motivation, and Meaning." Dr. Hum- 
phrey will preside as Chairman at the 
meeting of the Elementary School 
Health Education Section. He will also 
present a paper at the Research Section. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

(formerly College of Special and 
Continuation Studies) 



G. Allen Soger 



SPEECH TEACHER'S BOOK PUBLISHED 

rhe McGraw-Hill Company recently 
>ublished a new speech textbook. 
Iriefing and Conference Techniques, 
>y Dr. Glenn Loney, veteran lecturer 
n the Maryland Overseas Program. 

Written specifically for a student who 
leeds to develop skills in the many 
•hases of public speaking, including 
iresentations with audio-visual aids, the 
•ook is especially applicable to the 
xecutive, the scientist, and military or 
irofessional men who wish to become 
lore effective in their lines of endeavor. 

Dr. Loney received his Ph.D. from 
itanford University in 1953. He has 
aught basic communications at San 
r rancisco State College and English 
nd speech at the University of Nevada. 

Since 1956 he has taught for the Uni- 
ersity of Maryland Overseas Program, 
(Continued on next page) 





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# # # 

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TO THE 
MARYLAND 

MAGAZINE 

* # # 



1ARCH-APRIL. 1959 



55 



53rd ANNIVERSARY 



1906 




1959 



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specializing in speech and English 
COUTMS ti>r militar) and civilian 
students. 

I ROM STUDENTS In 1 1 u ill Ks 

in I Ml o\ I KM \s PROGRAM 

I wo resident lecturers in the Atlantic 

Division ol Maryland's Overseas Pro- 
gram are Maryland graduates and 
former students in the Overseas Pro- 
gram. I he> are Mr. Bernard E. Du- 
puis ami Mr Wolfe Schmokel. 

Mr. Dupuis. a former Air Force 
officer, first entered the Maryland Over- 
seas Program in 1949 at Med raw 
Kaserne, Munich. Germany. On his 
discharge from the service in 1954. he 
enrolled as a lull-time student on the 
College Park campus, receiving his 
B.S. degree in Military Science two 
years ago. 

Remaining at Maryland, Dupuis en- 
tered the Graduate School and earned 
the Master of Arts degree in Govern- 
ment and Politics in 1958. He is pres- 
ently assigned at Goose Bav. Labrador. 

Mr. Schmokel. a native of East Ger- 
man), began taking courses at the 
Munich Center in 1951. He also 
studied at centers in Iceland and Fort 
Meade. Maryland, and completed de- 
gree requirements in General Studies 
after his discharge from the service in 
1957. Completing his final semester 
on campus. Mr. Schmokel attained an 
over-all academic average of 3.9 and 
was graduated with first honors. 

In 1958. Mr. Schmokel received his 
Masters degree in History from Yale 
University, where he passed all his 
courses with honors. He is now as- 
signed at Kindley AFB. Bermuda. 

BENSON BOOK ON BUNYAN 

A recent issue of the Pacific Stars and 
Stripes contained a full page review of 
a publication by a University of Mary- 
land full-time lecturer stationed in the 
Far East. 

The book. Paul Banyan and His 
Men. was written by Dr. Ivan Benson. 
Lecturer in English. It was published 
by the Charles E. Tuttle Co.. Tokyo. 

Dr. Benson, who has taught for the 
University of Maryland since its ad- 
vent in the Far East — and who taught 
before that for the University of Cali- 
fornia Far East Program — first became 
acquainted with the tales of Paul Bun- 
van and his men as a boj in the saw- 
mill town ot Winton, Minnesota. Later, 
he worked in logging camps where he 
listened to the stories and passed them 
along to others. For 30 years he has 
been collecting the tales and assembling 
them in chronological order. 



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56 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



. \IM 0P1 1 K JOINS M UO I \M> 

UR SCIBNC1 mui 

\u I orce ( aptain Da\ id H. ] ( >pfei 
duated from the I niversitj ol Mai y 
land in Februarj and immediately 
joined the Department ol Air Science 
headed by Colonel R. E. Keiulig. 
I S \| Opfer has been on campus since 

lime. 1958, undei the Operation Boot 
strap program, and Ik- completed re 

quirements tor the M.s degree in Mili- 
tar\ Science. 

Five other members of the Maryland 
\ Science stall" are also graduates of 
the University. I hey are Major David 
K Broun. Major Casimir F. Hybki. 
Captain Irvin Klingenberg, Captain 
Silas G. Upchurch and 1st l.t. Donald 
Corrick. 

(apt. Opfer, a native of Baltimore. 
enlisted from there in 1943 before 
finishing high school and has remained 
OH continuous active duty ever since. 

He took his first Maryland courses 
in Munich, Germain, in the fall of 
1949. Meanwhile, he had completed 
the High School General Education De- 
velopment tests and received the High 
School Equivalency Certificate. He also 
completed the College GED in 1948. 

Since 1949. he has been enrolled 
continuously in Maryland courses ex- 
cept for one year while on duty in the 
States. In all. he completed 17 courses 
in the off-campus program of the Uni- 
versity. 



MARYLAND HONOR GRADUATE 
IS BACK FOR MORE 

Captain William D. Wight, USAF, is 
enrolled in the Maryland Graduate 
School working toward the Ph.D. in 
Business Organization and Adminis- 
ration. But behind that fact is an 
mpressive list of academic honors. 

One of those graduating in the first 
'cap and gown" ceremony ever held by 
in American university overseas, at the 
Heidelberg University auditorium in 
vfay 1954, Capt. Wight was the second 
?erson to complete an entire college 
:ducation in the University of Mary- 
and's Overseas Program. His under- 
rraduate grade average was 3.72. 

Returning to the United States, he 
vas assigned to Charleston AFB, South 
larolina, where he completed eight 
:ourses in the field of education through 
)ff-duty study at The Citadel, with a 
i.75 grade average. 

In the fall of 1957, Capt. Wight was 

ent to Indiana University under the 

JSAF Institute of Technology program. 

While earning a Master's degree in 

(Continued on next page) 



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<1ARCH-APR!L, 1959 



57 



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Business Administration his grade point 
average was A minus. He received the 
Master's with honors in 1958. 

In recognition ol his outstanding 
scholastic achievements, ( apt. Wight 
was elected to the l Diversity oi Mary- 
land Chapter Ol Phi Kappa Phi. nation- 
al scholastic honor society. While at 
Indiana University, he was elected to 
Sigma lota I psilon, national honorary 
and professional fraternity lor students 
of business management, and to Beta 
Gamma Sigma, national honorary busi- 
ness fraternity . 

hiking full advantage ol Maryland's 
overseas educational opportunities, 
(apt. Wight started with a high school 
diploma in the fall of 1950. continued 
with General Educational Development 
lests and completed 30 University of 
Maryland courses to come up with the 
highest average of his overseas grad- 
uating class. He studied at Wiesbaden. 
Rhein-Main, and Furstenfeldbruck. 
Germany. 

Captain Wight credits the Univer- 
sit\ of Maryland with contributing 
much to his academic success. "My rec- 
ord at the University of Maryland had 
a lot of bearing on my assignment to 
Indiana University as admission to the 
school was based on the record of the 
student's undergraduate studies."' he 
said. 

He is now assigned to Headquarters. 
USAF, and is currently enrolled in a 
graduate course in the Pentagon. 

SOBKE MAKES PHI KAPPA PHI 

Lt. Col. Llewellyn Sobke. still another 
University of Maryland student of dis- 
tinction, was initiated in Phi Kappa 
Phi fraternity in January upon com- 
pletion of his on-campus studies under 
Operation Bootstrap. 

Phi Kappa Phi is a national honorary 
fraternity for students who are among 
the upper one-tenth of their graduating 
class, in terms of grades. The Univer- 
sity's chapter was established in 1920. 

Col. Sobke completed his require- 
ments for the Bachelor of Science de- 
gree in Military Science. His induction 
to the fraternity was in absentia, since 
he has already reported to the U. S. 
Army language School at The Presi- 
dio. Monterey, California. 

Col. Sobke was one oi 73 Maryland 
students initiated into Phi Kappa Phi 
in January. 

Ms GRADUATE IS KM IK.IK1 IN 
( \I 11 ORNIA A1K DEFENSE 

Major Steve N. Pisanos, '55, is cur- 
rentlv Chiel ol Fighter Operations ol 
the 2~th Air Division assigned to de- 



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58 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



;nd the Southern California area. 

["he 58-yeai old fighter pilot h.is .1 
olorful background. Horn in Greece, 
e determined to be a pilot at the .igc 

t 14. 
When World War II broke out, 
tajor Pisanos, who was in the U. S. 

tteiulini; school, joined the Ro\.il 
Canadian Air Force. I transferred to 
Iritain as .1 fighter pilot, he joined the 
iagle Squadron, a group of Americans 
ssigned to the RAF. 

Later, after his squadron was trans- 
BITed under U. S. military control, 
lajor Pisanos subsequently received 
is coveted American citizenship 
apers. Shortly after D-Day. his plane 
,'as shot down in France, but in spite 
f a shattered shoulder he returned to 
is outfit with the help of the French 
aderground. 

Major Pisanos enrolled in Maryland 
ourses in the Pentagon in 1948 and 
ompleted his Bachelor of Science de- 
ree in Military Science under Opera- 
on Bootstrap on campus. 

He now holds a regular commission 
1 the USAF. 

NINE PENTAGON STUDENTS 
MAKE PHI ALPHA THETA 

Jine Pentagon students were among the 
recently initiated into the Beta 
)mega chapter of Phi Alpha Theta. 
National honorary history fraternity. 
The nine students honored included 
laj. George Betts, U. S. Army; Maj. 
William L. Bost, U. S. Army; WO 
latherine V. Dillon, USAF; CWO Mil- 
m Koren, USAF; Lt. Comdr. Donald 
/. McMaster, U. S. Navy; Comdr. 
rank M. Murphy, U. S. Navy; Maj. 
kmald W. Neilson, USAF; Comdr. 
harles S. Quinn, U. S. Navy; and 
apt. Conway J. Smith, USMC. 



IOCIAL NOTES 



MARRIAGES 

fiss Sally Anne Hart, became Mrs. 
loyd C. Adams, Jr., December 27, in 
'olorado Springs, Colorado. Mrs. 
.dams is the daughter of Lt. Gen. 
'harles E. Hart, Commanding Gen- 
ral, United States Army Air Defense 
ommand, and Mrs. Hart. 
Miss Joanne Kreh, Nursing '57, was 
larried to Doctor Nevins Todd, Jr., on 
anuary 3, 1959. 

(Continued on next page) 



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ARCH-APRIL, 1959 



59 



Criss Brothers & C«. 



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Mrs. Floyd Cecil Adams. Jr.. the former 
Miss Sally Anne Hart, who was married 
on Dei ember 27 in Colorado Springs to 
('apt. Floyd Cecil Adams, Jr.. of the 
United Stales Army. Mrs. Adams is the 
daughter of Lt. Gen. Charles E. Hart, 
Commanding General, United States Army 
Air Defense Command, and Mrs. Hart, 
27 Broadmoor Ave.. Colorado Springs. 



BIRTHS 

To Mr. and Mrs. Victor Holm, a 
daughter. Elizabeth. December 20, 
1958. Mrs. Holm is the former Page 
Cressman, Ed. '55. Vic is a 1957 grad- 
uate of the College of Arts and 
Sciences. He is presently serving in the 
capacity of Field Secretary for the L'ni- 
versity's Alumni Association. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Stanley E. Schwartz, 
a daughter, Skai Wallace, December 4. 
1958. Dr. Schwartz is a 1937 graduate 
of the College of Arts & Sciences and 
a 1941 graduate of the School of 
Medicine. 

Mr. and Mrs. James 
Jr.. of Denver. Colorado, 
birth of a son. Bruce 
November 1 6. 

Mrs. McKenzie was the former Kath- 
leen Patrick, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. 
Arthur S. Patrick. Kathleen was grad- 
uated in Art Education. '55, and James 
is a graduate of the College of Engi- 
neering. '54. 

Other births: Dolores Alpert Dia- 
mond. Ed. '55, daughter. Claudia Ann 
and Lois Atkinson Mast. Ed. "57. 
daughter. Deborah Lynn. 



S. McKenzie. 
announce the 
Calder. born 



BIRTHS TO NURS1M. Ml \t\M 

To Dr. and Mrs. Lewis \| Nebens, a 
son. Bruce Michael, on September 4. 
1958. Mrs. Nebens was Irene Abra- 
ham. '57. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Peter Blauvelt, a 
son. Michael Field, on October 18, 



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THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



958, Mrs Blauvell was I ouisc 
rtcKalister, '57. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Paul A. I homas, B 
laughter, Betsj Bancker, on Nov. 18, 
958. Mrs. rhomas was Nancj \m.i- 
Ion, '-* l >. 

ro Captain and Mrs. Robert D. I'm 
oil. a son. Robert Davis, Jr., on Sep- 
ember M). 1958. Mrs. I'm cell was 
^nn Jackson. '52. 

lo Dr. and Mrs. James 1. aster, a 
aughter, Jamie Elizabeth, on October 
. [958. Mis 1 aster was Betty Smith 
aster. '58. 



OMPLETED 
AREERS 



OR. JOHN E. YOUNC.KR 

he alumni and faculty of the Col- 
;ge of Engineering were shocked to 
tear of the passing of Dr. John E. 
'ounger on December 29th at Prince 
ieorge's General Hospital. Dr. Young- 
i. Mechanical Engineering Department 

huirman since 1938, was the recipient 
I many honors and awards during his 
fetime as a result of his pioneering 
>ork in the field of aircraft design. 
)r. Younger was held in high esteem 
iy his former students not only as an 
\cellent teacher, but also as a good 
riend. 

The thought was expressed by many 
f "Doc's" former students and friends 
hat it would be appropriate to establish 

memorial in his honor as a token of 
lie admiration and respect they had 
or him. Plans are being drawn up 
or the establishment of a fund tenta- 
ively called "The Faculty-Alumni 
lemorial Fund of the College of En- 
ineering"; disposition of the money 
i the fund to be determined by ad- 
ninistrators chosen from the Engineer- 
ig Faculty and the Engineering Alumni 
toard of Directors. It is proposed that 
he fund be used for special purposes 
. ithin the College of Engineering such 
s student loans, purchase of rare books 
or the Engineering Library, scholar- 
hips (ultimately) etc. A plaque com- 
nemorating those in whose names 
nemorials have been established is also 
>roposed. Although the Fund is still 
n the formative stage, contributions 
lave already been received for its es- 
ablishment. For accounting purposes 
The Faculty-Alumni Memorial Fund 
if the College of Engineering" is to be 
ncluded within the broad framework 
(Continued on next page) 



rs^ 



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1ARCH-APRIL. 1959 



61 



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Khirm Heating and Coolinjr 
Equipment 

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Washington 18, D.C. 

10 Minutes from College Park 

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3718 Rhode Island Avenue 

MT. RAINIER, MD. 

AP. Mill 



It Pays to Advertise 
in Maryland Magazine 



ol the Greater Lm\ersil\ of Maryland 
Fund. Those desiring to contribute to 
the Facult\ -Alumni Fund may do so 
bj either designating the fund on the 
hack of the Greater Universit) of 
Maryland Fund card or h\ sending a 
check pa\ahle u> 1 he Universit) ol 
Maryland tor a memorial to Dr. John 
I Younger to Prof. ( R Ha\leck. 
Jr.. Dept ot Mechanical Fngineering. 
College of Fngineering. Universit) ol 
Maryland, College Park. Maryland. 



R. D. Vs \Im»s 

Mr K D. Watson, one of the Univer- 
sity's most devoted alumni, died sud- 
denly at the beginning ot this year. He 
was President of the James A. Messer 
Company, wholesale plumbing firm of 
Washington. Baltimore. and Silver 
Spring. 

Mr. Watson was a member of the 
Terrapin Club and was active in alumni 
affairs. 

He passed aw ay at his home. New 
Year's Guest Farm. Glenwood, Mary- 
land. 

DR. RICHARD MARION NELSON 

Dr. Richard M. Nelson. M.D.. 03. died 
recently at his home in Atlanta. 
Georgia. His passing was noted by The 
Fulton County Medical Society, in that 
bod\'s Bulletin. 

Dr. Nelson moved to Atlanta in 1912 
after serving as Chief of Eye. Ear. Nose 
and Throat service of Colon Hospital, 
Cristobal. Canal Zone. Panama. He 
was married to Mary E. Seymour in 
1904. He was the father of three 
children, two of whom survive. He 
was a scholar, an author, a teacher, 
and honored member of his community. 

RICHARD W. SHAFFER 
Richard W. Shaffer, Ed.. "41. Assistant 
Superintendent of the wheel department 
of Johnstown Plant. Bethlehem Steel 
Company, died recently. Death was at- 
tributed to a heart attack. 

While at the University, Mr. Shaffer 
was active in sports. Following gradua- 
tion, he served in the United States 
Army, attaining the rank of captain. 
He began working at the wheel plant 
following his separation from military 
duty in 1945. 

He is survived by his wife, the for- 
mer Margaret Weil, also a graduate of 
the University, and one daughter. 

JOHN DI \TER ROGERS. JR. 

John D. Rogers. Jr.. B.P.A. "42. a 
Richmond. Virginia, attorney, passed 
awa) recently at the age of 38. Mr. 
Rogers was a member of the Richmond 




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62 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



li.u Association, the Richmond Power 
Squadron and of the Christ 1 piscopal 
Church. Survivors include bis wife, 
lean Gregorj Rogers; his p . 1 1 ^- 1 1 1 -> . \ii 
and Mrs. John D. Rogers, and .1 sister, 
\li>s Marie Mills Rogers, .ill oi Rich- 
mond. 

Dl hi R ( OMP1 1 1 I D 1 \ki 1 l(s 

Dr. Stewart O. Burns, D.D.S. 14. of 

Millhum. Now Jersej 

Dr. Allen Eugene Burner, M.D. 'OS. 
ol Durbin, West Virginia. 

Dr Ralph F. Broun. D.D.S. '16, ol 

Millvillc. Now Jersey. 

Mrs. Annie Roader Mohler, Nursing 
17, deceased on April 24. 1958. 

Miss Nancj Minnis. Nursing '17, de- 
.oasod on November, l l >. 1958. 

R O MONO .1. QUINN 

Or. Raymond J. Quinn. M.D. '13, died 
recent!) at his home in Waterbury, 
Connecticut. 

Dr. Quinn opened an office in Water- 
)urj in I l ' 16. He was for many years 
load of the Department of Pediatrics 
it St. Mary's Hospital. Waterbury. 

Active in many civic and social or- 
ganizations, he was named "Man of the 
* oar" by the Washington Hill Athletic 
;iub in 1956. 

Surviving Dr. Quinn are his wife, 
wo sisters, three daughters, two sons, 
ind 27 grandchildren. 

VINCENT MOTTO 

Dr. Vincent Motto, D.D.S. 15 (B.C.- 
3.S.), died at Hartford. Connecticut, 
-lospital recently, following a short 
llness. 

Dr. Motto spent most of his life in 
4artford. He was that city's first 
mblic school dentist and practiced den- 
istry there for 44 years. 

He was Past Secretary of the Hart- 
ord Dental Society, a member of the 
Connecticut State Dental Association, 
he American Dental Association, St. 
Kugustin's Holy Name Society and the 
it. Vincent DePaul Society of St. 
Augustin's Church. 

Surviving Dr. Motto are his wife, a 
on. a daughter and three grand- 
hildren. 

HOWARD CRISP 

■loward L. Crisp, former Superinten- 
lent of Buildings and Grounds, died 
ecently of a heart attack at his home 
n College Park. He was 87 years old. 

The former Superintendent was 
Jso a teacher of mechanical engineer- 
ing- 

He is survived by four sons and one 
laughter. 

^ARCH-APRIL. 1959 



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Serving the Farm Since 1913 

The Shore's Finest Fertilizer 

THE WORCESTER FERTILIZER COMPANY 

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Phone TA 2-3000 



63 



Directory of Advertisers 



i in. 52 
c ompan) 

Service 19 
50 

il • 

. . i.imi < ompan) 42 

• Products ' AikIi.h I i n . i 

\ i) Anderson 52 

■ lllagc Shop 44 

Arundel Federal Saving! .v. loan \«n 56 

Il Si 1 1 Ice i ompan) . I he 56 

laied Electrical Constructor*, Inc '< 

Atchison a. Kellei bit 56 

Alvin I Aublnoe Outside Back Covei 

mc I icus 44 
H A H I M1.111nM.1UHs, Inc 

Baltimore Asphalt Block A nie < o ^ 

ire Business I orms . 18 
Baltimore (link Room Service .57 

Baltimore I nvelope < ompan) 51 

Baltimore Gai a i lectric ( ompan) 26 

Baltimore I ore < ompan) ^2 
Bank ,.i ( risfield 

Bard Avon School 50 

mn's I aundr) 61 

Henr) O. Berman ( o . Ini , . . 59 

Bethesda Motoi Hotel 2 l ) 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg c o . Inc <i 

Bio Ramo Drug Compan) 4> 

Blackie's House ol Beel 44 

Edward Boker Frosted Foods 4ti 

Hun ["on Saratoga Chip Distributors 37 

ll.irn A. Boswell Co 62 

i s Bowen Electrical contractor 61 

Bow man Motoi Sales 62 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 36 

Briggs Meat Product Co 39 

Dextei 1 Bryan 62 

But k class ( ompany 52 

( abeil's ( alifornian 61 

( .a lea Janitor Supply Co 38 

( arpel C enter 46 

I homas I i arroll & Son 62 

( asual Catering Service 45 

( ave I ord 39 

I). Ilarr\ Chambers, Opticians 38 

Chestnut Farms Dairy 40 

[homafl I Clark, Inc 37 

ClOVerland I arms Dairy 28 

C'ohn A. Bock Cdmpany 48 

1 h/aheih Coone) Personnel Agency 57 

County Title Company 41 

A. Myron Cowell, inc 29 

C riss Brothers & Co 60 

Crosse A Blackwell Co 33 

Crown Oil A: Wax Company 27 

Victor CUShwa A: Sons 42 

( ustom Music Systems 41 

Davidson transfer & Storage Co 57 

F. A. Davis & Sons 38 

John II Davis 34 

i) < Ignition Headquarters, inc 60 

Del Haven White House Motel 40 

J II DeVeau & sons, inc 37 

Dietrich <\ Gambrill, Inc 54 

Dommo Restaurant 56 

Douglas Aircraft Co., inc 30 

Drummond A Compan) 51 

Norman s Earie) 4 Son 27 

Eastern Overall Compan) 54 

1 dmonds < Iptician 58 

Electronic Wholesalers, inc 31 

i Mi kjco Restaurant 58 

Embass) Moving & Storage, Iru 35 

i ed I ngtehardt . . 48 



I aimeis C OOperative Association 

J H I ilbcrl. Inc 52 

I list Federal S.oings A loan Assn 

Inside Front < 
I .<u Ign Motors, I id .51 

Fraternit) Federal Savings a loan Assn 54 

I rederick i nderwriters, ln> 27 

I ullet A d Albert. Inc 55 



k.i\ c, aincs sieei Compan) 39 

Garamond Press 3' 

s v (,,,iii ,\ son. Inc 29 

Albeit I Coet/e Packing Co 3* 

( oncrete Pipe C ompany 54 



[he Handy line I Paul M. Adam- i 57 

ll.innes I ormal W ear 61 

Harford Metal Products, Inc. .32 

Harrington Hotel 31 

Harvej Dairy. Inc 30 

lleruller's Ice ( ream 40 

Hilly aid Sales Co 36 

llmde A Dauch 27 

Hut's I lectrical Service, ln^ 62 

Robert F. Hofl 37 

I lie llollberger Company 54 

Horner ElevatOl Co., Inc 35 

Hotel Dupont Pla/a Outs ile Hack Cover 

HufTer-Shinn Optical Co 36 

The Industrial Corp 43 

Johnston. lemon A: Co 29 



I A. Kaestner Co 51 

Kefauver Lumber Co.. Inc 50 

Kidwell & Kidwell. Inc 29 

King Bios.. Inc. Printing 38 

Kingsville Inn 43 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 32 

Koontz Creamery. Inc 63 



Lamar & Wallace 42 

Ledo Restaurant 49 

Maurice Leeser Co 55 

Eddie Leonard & Sons Sporting Goods Co. 47 

Lord Calvert Hotel 58 

I ustine-Nicholson Chevrolet 42 



Mangels, Herold Co.. Inc 31 

Maria's Restaurant 30 

Marks Home Furnishings 34 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 32 

Meadowgold Ice Cream Co 47 

F. O. Mitchell & Bro.. Inc 54 

Modern Machinist Co 60 

Modern Stationery Co 50 



John J. & F. Rowland McGinity 50 

Ml 1 cod & Romborg Stone Co 37 

McNeill Surveys. Inc 42 



National Bank ol Cambridge 48 

National Equipment A; Supply Co 37 

Norman Motor Company 61 

Normandy Farms M 

North Washington Press. Inc 42 

Northrop Aircraft. Inc Inside Back Covet 

Occidental Restaurant 46 

Olncy Inn 36 

Ottenberg's Bakers. Inc. 56 



Palmer Lord, Inc 60 

Park Iranslcr Co 34 

Peninsula Poultry Distributors. Inc 43 

Penn Hotel I Bernie lee's) 46 

Perpetual Building Assocn 62 

R. B. Phelps Stone Co 40 

Poor, Bowen. Bartletl A. Kennedy. Ini 51 

Jimmie Porter (T A Kiernan's) 36 



Quaint Acres Nurser) 
Quick Service laundry 



49 

42 



Refrigeration Supply Co 34 

Restaurant 823 58 

Restorll Motors 39 

Rex Engraving Company 41 

Ridgeville Nurseries 27 

ROCCO'S Charcoal House 60 

Roma Restaurant 

Rose I xterminator Co 53 

Salisbury Milling Co 48 

Sahsburs Rug Company 4* 

Van Rensselaer P Saxe 

Sthluderbcrg-Kurdle Co 54 

Seidenspinner. Realtor 

The Shade Shop 44 

Silver Hill Sand A. Gravel Co 49 

A. H. Smith Sand A. Gravel Co 

Russell W. Smith. Insurance 50 

Smith's Book Store 45 

Smith Welding Co 31 

Southcomb. Inc 

Southeastern Floor Co 49 

Southeast Title Corp 54 . 

Southern Oxygen Co 55 1 

Southern Plate Glass Co 33 ' 

F. H. Sparks Co. of Maryland 

Spevak Packing Company 59 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 48 

Stafford Hotel 51 

Star Baking Company 

Sterling Process. Bookbinders J" 

Strayer College 32 

Student's Supply Store 48 

Suburban Trust Co 40 

Mano Swartz 45 

Sweetheart Bakers 48 

Taylor House Restaurant 44 

Taylor's Catering Service 60 | 

Thomas & Thompson Co 

Thompson Furniture Co 58 

Thomsson Steel Co 31 

Wm. J. Tickner & Sons. Inc 50 

Town Hall Tavern 59 

United Clay Products Co H 

Universal Electro Plating Co 46 



James T. Yern.iy A. Sons Co 
R. L. Voight & Son. Inc. . 



Wallop A Son. Insurance 

Washington Coca-Cola Bottling Works .... 
Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange. Inc. 

Washington Woodworking Co.. Inc 

J. 1. Wells Co., Inc 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 

White Rice Inn 

Wholesale Radio Parts Co.. Inc 

Perry O. Wilkinson 

i McKenn) Willis 

W R W inslow Co 

w orcester Fertilizer Co 

Wye Plantation 



40 

35 
35 

M 

60 

50 
30 

36 



"i ork Building Products. Inc 41 

Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 42 



64 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



.NEWS IS HAPPENING AT NORTHROP 




On the right, shown following through on preflight 
checkout: Hydraulics Design Engineer Curt Coderre, 
at 28, responsible for vital systems of the USAF 7-38. 



Curf (BSME, UCLA, '53) joined Northrop Division 
during the summer between his junior and senior 
years, stayed on to become a Northrop 5-year man. 



YOUNG ENGINEERS CREATE NEWS AT NORTHROP! 



Youthful engineers and scientists discover an ideal, crea- 
tive work climate when they join Northrop - a growing 
organization headed by aggressive, forward-thinking 
management. Northrop's new, dynamic and diversified 
corporate structure consists of three autonomous divi- 
sions-all located in Southern California, all managed 
by men avidly receptive to fresh ideas. 

For the next two minutes, assume that you can qualify 
to join us -that you're a man who wants to create to- 
morrow's headlines. 

You'll choose to join the Division offering greatest chal- 
lenge for your own special talents, making your choice 
from the more than 30 different operational fields in 
which we're actively exploring the future. 

You'll earn top money, within a salary structure outstand- 
ing in the industry. Increases will come as soon and as 
often as you earn them, based on your own individual 
achievement. Fringe benefits include a uniquely liberal 
vacation policy, among many others. 

You'll work with recognized leaders in their fields-highly 
creative men -fellow engineers especially skilled in de- 
veloping the talents of younger men. In addition, they 
operate on the sound principle of delegating their author- 
ity, assuring you credit for engineering triumphs. 

You'll learn while you earn, with no-cost and low-cost 
educational opportunities at leading Southern California 
institutions -earn advanced degrees and keep abreast of 
latest technological advances in your chosen field. 

So, check these facts on Northrop's three Divisions -see 
which most closely fits your own interests. 



A 



NORTHROP DIVISION 

Creators of the USAF Snark SM-62, now 
operational with SAC. Currently active in 
programs for the ballistic recovery of orbiting 
man; flight-testing USAF-NorthropT-38,and 
readying Northrop's N-156F NATO-SEATO 
counterair fighter for flight tests. 

RADIOPLANE DIVISION 

Creator of the world's first drone family; has 
produced and delivered tens of thousands of 
drones for all the U.S. Armed Forces. Now 
developing ultra-advanced target drone 
systems for weapon evaluation, surveillance 
drone systems, and guided missile systems. 

NORTRONICS DIVISION 

Pioneers in celestial and inertial guidance. At 
Hawthorne: exploring infrared applications, 
airborne digital computers and interplan- 
etary navigation. At Anaheim: developing 
ground support, optical and electro-mechani- 
cal equipment, and data-processing devices. 



WRITE TODAY for complete information on Northrop and all 
three of its Divisions to: Engineering & Scientific Personnel 
Placement Office, Northrop, P.O. Box 1525, Beverly Hills, 
California. 



A 



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Phone : 
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Volume XXX • Number 4 
May-June ■ 1959 



the 



Maryland 



magazine 



Alumni Publication of the 



University of Maryland 




iHuvttsiTYOF Maryland | 



JUN1- 1959 



In This Issue: 



i- 



The Tidewater Conference 
Dr. Younger Inspires Memorial Fund 
Maryland Plans and Builds for the Future 
Far East Commencement Graduates 37 




Class of '59: Which row will you hoe? 




Each one - like your chosen vocation - offers its 
individual challenge, its own opportunities and 
advantages. That's why you chose it. 

We invite you to select your bank in the same 
way. Like your career, your bank should offer 
opportunities and advantages especially for you. 
Maryland Trust does just that. Our facilities 
and services are the ideal tools for young men 
and women with a new row to hoe! 



Baltimore 3, Maryland 

Stanley B. Trott, President 

Member Federal Reserve System and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 




COVER 

Our photograph shows ///<■ lull round-table r< 'minor <>i what has now been 

termed, i dewater conference, a meeting o) 30 A<\ faculty to discuss 

the instructional programs of the University, An article dealing with the Con- 
ference begins on page fix. 

PHOTOGRAPH in U DANEGCER, III U>. PHOTOGRAPH!! SE< flON 



the 



Maryland 



Volume XXX 



magazine 

Number 4 



MAY- JUNE 



1959 



Alumni Publication of 

the University of Maryland 

BOARD OF REGENTS 



CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice Chairman 

8. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 

LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

EDMUND S. BURKE. Assistant Treasurer 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

ENOS S. STOCKBRIDGE 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

C. EWING TUTTLE 

MRS. SARA A. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELA T I O NS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFIC ERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

FRANK BLOCK, '24, President 

HARRY A. BOSWELL, JR., '42, Vice-President 

MRS. GERALDINE P. EDWARDS, '31, Vice-President 

DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 
Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018) (FE 7-2113) 



In This Issue — 



FEATURES 



2 

4 

6 

9 

ll 

14 

14 

15 

16 

16 

17 

18 



MEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



COMMENCEMENT 

and the 

LUMN1 SPRING REUNIONS 

will be carried in full 

in the 

JULY - AUGUST ISSUE 

•ELIVERED BY MAIL BY JULY 1) 
* * * * 



19 
22 
22 
24 
26 
30 
34 
39 
40 
43 
46 
51 
56 
57 

59 
61 

64 



The Alumni Diary 

Alumni and Campus Notes 

The Tidewater Conference 

Prominent Alumnus Delivers Expert Testimony on Housing Measures 

Maryland Plans and Builds lor the Future 

Dr. Younger Inspires Engineer's Memorial Fund 

Alumni Participation in Fund Shows Sharp Upsurge 

Pre-Commencement Activities in Full Swing 

200 Attend SREB Graduate Nursing Conference 

News from the Clubs 

Far East Commencement Graduates 37 

University Sports 

Varsity Teams Go on a Spring Fling 

Golf Course Dedicated May 15 



Agriculture 

Air Science 

Arts and Sciences 

Business and Public Administration 

Dentistry 

Education 

Engineering 

Home Economics 

Law 

Medicine 

Nursing 

Pharmacy 

Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

University College 



Social Notes 
Completed Careers 



Directory of Advertisers 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md., as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 



I in Genera] Alumni Council 

U HCOl 1\1> ( <>I 1 I 1.1 

Kl Ml SENTATIVES 

tin H Hamilton, "29 
( layton Reynold* 
rheodore I Bissell 

. 
U Gilbert Hem.. Jr.. '26 
K.ilph Ci Shure, 
c hariea K Merricl 

. ISS A I'lHlll ADMINISTIATION 

Harrj S Boswell, Jr., '42 
AJvio S Klein. '37 
i it l l ingley, '27 

Dl Mlilll 

Dr. Samuel Brvant 

l)r Eugene I). Lyon, '38 

Dr. Edwin G. Gail, '18 

Mrs John J. Hovert, Jr.. '50 
Judson Bell. "41 
Hans Hasslinger, '33 

Emmett Loane, '29 
Robert M Rivello. '43 
Arthur G. VanReuth, '34 

HOME ECOSOM ICS 

Mis Miriam Beall, '31 

M r>. Geraldine P. Edwards, '31 

Mr-.. Agnes McNutt-Kricker, '31 

LAW 

G. Kenneth Reiblich. '29 
Benjamin B. Rosenstock, '25 
Layman J. Redden, '34 

MEOICINl 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams. 34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

S L RSI NO 

Mrs. Evelyn Koontz Musav: 
Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, '50 
Mrs. Norma Fuller Yeager. '48 

PHilUACT 

Frank Block. '24 
Norman J. Levin, '38 
Gordon Mouat. '37 



ALL WNi CLIB REPRESESTATU ES: 
Baltimore — Charles P. Ellinger, '37 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett. '30 
Cumberland— H. Reford Aldridge. '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley. '2f 
Frederick County — 

James F. Zimmerman, '37 
' M" Club — George Knepley. '39 
New England — Georce Kerlejza. '25 
Neu York— Harold McGay, '50 
Overseas — Col. Edward J. Fletcher. '37 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph Finegold. 74 
Prince Georges — Thomas R. Brooks, '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix. 36 
Scbenectad) — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens. 19 
I S Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans. 76 



EX-OFUl 10 \ll\fRERS: 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David I Brigham, 

\< < n tary -Treasurer 

losepfa H. Deckman, '31. Past President 
J Gilbert Prendergast, '33. Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, 18. Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10. Post President 
Dr. Albert E. Cioldstein. '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, I". /'.;*: President 
« \ Koons, '29. Past President 
Dr \rlhur I. Bell. '19, Past President 




THE ALUMNI DIARY 



Dl \k mm ovv \i ( MSI: 

There is always a gate." So wrote Dean Manchester of Kent State L'niversit;. 
He went on to sa>. Yes. there is always a gale so that freshmen may always passj 
from the outside in and the seniors can pass from the inside out. The gate ex- 
perience is one to keep in the memory book." 

Another Commencement is at hand. The class of 1959 will contribute nearh 
2000 members to the ever swelling ranks ol the Alumni Association. The manv 
who have been greeted, recognized and welcomed into the Alumni Association 
in the past 150 years now join in extending to these new alumni the hearty hand- 
shake which makes complete the transition from student to alumni status. Col- 
lectively, we wish for each, the degree of achievement and success commensurate 
with present aspirations and visions. 

Those who have passed through the gate know that an institution is constantlv 
judged by those who have walked its educational pathways. The major tests of 
life lie ahead. Members of the Alumni Association who have already tra\elled 
the road, stand ready to offer encouragement, lend assistance and establish 
posts of direction. 

As we welcome each new alumnus and ask that his interest in the University 
of Maryland remain strong, we also pledge our best efforts to give generous un- 
derstanding and support to the many who have yet to enter the gate. Onh as we 
develop an increasing interest in the Alumni Association can we strengthen our or- 
ganization to the point where it will be a continuing and vital factor in maintaining 
the prestige of the University of Maryland. 

There are many outlets for continuing interests on the part of all alumni. Man) 
have discovered that it is good to re-enter the gate through return visits to the 
campus, visits with faculty members, reunions with schoolmates and to enjov 
athletic contests. Others enjoy the sometimes distant view through the gate bv 
their participation in alumni clubs and through publications such as the alumni 
magazine Maryland which report both alumni and University activities. Ab 
all. the University, much in the same vein as the individual alumnus, wants to be 
remembered, appreciated, admired and at times, assisted. 

It is not difficult for those who are older to receive a much needed lift from 
the enthusiastic desire and ambition of those who set a firm and confident foot 
upon the first rung of the ladder of success. Members of the class of 1959 are 
now the focal point of the eyes of more experienced alumni. We are confident 
your experience within the gate has been a benefit and one which will have a con- 
tinuing impact upon vour life. We are certain that \ou will not forget and that 
manv times in the life ahead, you will turn back in thought and in action to make 
certain the gate stavs open. 

We leave you with hopes, memories and a life as challenging as any which 
mankind has ever faced. As a country editor once put it. "Man's life needs a 
noble purpose beyond the processes of making a living and reproducing our kind. 
I hat great purpose grows out oi our intellectual and spiritual potential. Th 
our one great opportunity to intluence a world which moves with overwhelming 
speed. The future of the world is in your hands because >ou are \oung. because 
>ou are unafraid, and because you can be a force for good in the world." 

Just as the gate will always be open for new students, so >ou will alwa>s rind 
a gateman read) to oiler you the kev tor a return visit to vour campus. 

As ever. 




£24*L_ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Engineer Larry Klivans reviews the results of a computer- 
simulated ground checkout of Radioplane Division's 
near-sonic RP-76 rocket-powered target drone. Formerly 



at Norair Division, Larry came to Radioplane in 1955. At 
31, he is Manager of the Division's 140-man Electronic 
Support Group, is working toward his doctorate at UCLA. 



YOUNG ENGINEERS ARE NORTHROP'S NEWSMAKERS! 



Northrop Corporation's dynamic and diversified corporate struc- 
ture creates an ideal work climate for forward-thinking scientists 
and engineers. Our three autonomous divisions are all in Southern 
California - are all headed by progressive management eager to 
examine and try new ideas. 

Let's assume that you are a man who can qualify for one of our 
engineering teams - a man who can create history! 

YOU'LL EARN what you're worth, get increases as often as you earn 
them - based on your own individual achievements. Our salary 
structure is unique in the industry; our vacation policy extra-liberal, 
as are all of our other fringe benefits. 

YOU'LL LEARN while you earn, with no-cost and low-cost education 
opportunities at leading Southern California institutions - earn ad- 
vanced degrees and keep abreast of latest technological advances 
in your own chosen field. 

YOU'LL WORK with men who are acknowledged leaders in their fields 
-men chosen for their own capabilities and for skills in guiding 
and developing the creative talents of younger men. And, these 
are men who delegate authority, assuring your fair share of credit 
for engineering triumphs. 

YOU'LL BE FLEXIBLE-able to apply your talents to the work you enjoy, 
in the field best suited to your own inclination and ability. Northrop 
Corporation and its divisions offer wide diversity, with over 30 
operational fields to choose from. All offer challenge aplenty - 
opportunity unlimited! 



RADIOPLANE DIVISION. Creator of the world's first drone family; has 
produced and delivered tens of thousands of drones for all the U.S. 
Armed Forces. Now developing ultra-advanced target drone sys- 
tems for weapon evaluation, surveillance drone systems, and mis- 
sile systems. 

NORTRONICS DIVISION. Pioneer in celestial and inertial guidance. 
Currently exploring infrared applications, airborne digital com- 
puters and interplanetary navigation; developing ground support, 
optical and electro-mechanical, and data-processing equipment. 

NORAIR DIVISION. Creator of SAC's intercontinental USAF Snark 
SM-62. Currently active in programs for the ballistic recovery of 
orbiting man; flight-testing the USAF T-38 supersonic trainer; 
readying the N-156F NATO-SEATO fighter for flight tests. 

NOW WRITE! Get full information on Northrop Corporation and all 
of its Divisions. Then choose the division that offers you the most 
challenge. To reserve your spot where news is happening, write: 
Engineering & Scientific Personnel Placement Office, Northrop 
Corporation, P.O. Box 1525, Beverly Hills, California. 



Mi 



A 



Divisions of NORTHROP CORPORATION 




AY-JUNE. 1959 




ALUMNI AND CAMPUS NOTES 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



MAY 

28 



Senior Dinner Dance — Sheraton 
Park Hotel. Washington, D. ( . 

29-june -4 i inal Examinations. 

JO Memorial Day, Holiday. 

31 Baccalaureate Exercises — 
Memorial Chapel. 



II M 

3 



4-5 



School of Dentistry: Omicron 
Kappa Upsilon convocation — 
Lord Baltimore Hotel. Baltimore. 
I bird Triennial Dental Alumni 
Meeting: Morning Essay Ses- 
sions; luncheons; Golf Tourna- 
ment: banquet Thursday evening. 
five-year reunions beginning 
1909. honoring 50-year grads — 
lord Baltimore Hotel. 
School of Medicine Alumni Day. 
morning and afternoon sessions: 
luncheon at University Hospital: 
Banquet in the evening at the 
Lord Baltimore Hotel. 



4 School of Pharmacy and the 
School of Pharmacy Alumni 
Association Banquet honoring 
the 1959 graduating Class — 
Emerson Hotel. Baltimore. 

5 School of Nursing Alumnae an- 
nual banquet and dance in honor 
of the 1959 graduating class; 
class reunions — Emerson Hotel. 

6 Commencement — Cole Activi- 
ties Building. 

15-19 Rural Women's Short Course — 
College Week for Women — Col- 
lege Park campus. 

18-20 Library Buildings and Equip- 
ment Institute — McKeldin 
Library. 
22 Registration. Summer Session — 
College Park campus. 

22-July 13 Summer Institue for Teach- 
ers of Mathematics in Junior 
High School. 

22-July 31 Summer Program on Human 
Development. 

22-July 3 1 Teaching Conservation of Na- 



tural Resources^ — Summer Schoo 

Workshop. College of Agriculture 
22-July 31 Non-Credit Typing Progran 

— College Park campus. 
2? Summer Session begins — Colleg 

Park campus. 
24-26 Adult Education Institute — Stu 

dent Union Building. College 

Park campus. 



JULY 

6-17 

6-17 

20-31 

27-31 

31 



AUGUST 

3-8 



Choral and Band Worksh. 
College Park campus. 
Cosmetology I Institute — Collet. 
Park campus. 
Cosmetologv II Institute. 
Cosmetology III Institute. 
Summer Session ends — Collegi 
Park campus. 



State 4-H Club Week— College 
Park campus. 



Pupils in seven high schools of Washington County, Maryland, 
viewed a closed circuit television program February 24. featur- 
ing career possibilities in pharmacy. The effort was the re- 
sult of alumni-faculty teamwork. 

Left to riuht. Catherine L. Beachley. supervisor of guidance 
and research for the Washington County Board of Education, 



interviews Noel E. Foss, Dean of the School of Phari 
Arthur Harhaugh, Hagerstown pharmacist and member 
Maryland Stale Board of Pharmacy: and H. Nelson Warfield 
Director of Professional Services of Read's Drug Stores anc 
Chairman of the recruitment program of the University o 
Maryland School of Pharmacy Alumni Association. 



WILMYER STUDIO. HAGERSTi >\\ \ 




5 

3 



♦ 



4 



1)K. I I KINS All I NDS Mil I IN(I 

01 Board oi Am University 

Hi WiKon II. Elkins, Presidenl ol the 
I Diversity and a member of the Board 
,i| Visitors to the Air University, met 
with other members ot the Board ;it 
Maxwell Air Force Base. March 2-6. 

The panel of 1 1 distinguished Amcri- 
;an educators and businessmen meet at 
least once annually to examine the cur- 
ricula, management and facilities of the 
Air Force's professional education 
system. 

Dr. Elkins was appointed to the 
Board by personal invitation of Air 
Force Chief of Staff General Thomas 
I). White. 

Air University, not to be confused 
,vith the Air Force Academy, includes 
he Air War College, Air Command 
jnd Staff College, Air Force Reserve 
Officers Training Corps, School of 
\viation Medicine, Institute of Tech- 
lology, Extension Course Institute, Re- 
;earch Studies Institute, and Air Uni- 
ersitv Library. 

Mr. McCormick 
Receives Youth Award 

\lr. Charles P. McCormick, Chair- 
nan of the Board of Regents and 
rhairman of the Board of McCormick 
k Co., Inc., was named Big Brother 
if the Year for Maryland at a banquet 
ield recently in Baltimore. Two or- 
janizations — the Big Brothers of Balti- 
nore and the Jewish Big Brother 
.eague — presented an award to Mr. 
vfcCormick at their 42nd annual get 
ogether. In making the award, offi- 
cials of the two agencies cited Mr. Mc- 
cormick's direct contributions to un- 
lerprivileged youth through his activi- 
ies with the Boys' Clubs of America 
he is a national director). Buddies, 
nc. and the Police Boys' Clubs of 
Jaltimore. 

Mr. McCormick recently served as 
hairman of the counting committee of 
he President's Assay Commission. The 
Commission, first established in 1792, 
> responsible for the counting, weighi- 
ng and assaying of silver money coined 
a government mints. 

Colonel Kendig Transferred 

"olonel Robert E. Kendig, Professor of 
^ir Science and Head of the Depart- 
lent of Air Science, will assume new 
luties with the Air Force about the 
liddle of June. Col. Kendig will be 
ransferred to an Air Training Com- 
land at Amarillo, Texas. Replacing 
im will be Colonel Theodore R. 
iyles worth. 



Si NATOR Ki NN1 in VlSI is ( Wli'i s 

t s Senator John F, Kennedy ii> 
Mass.) presented an address to the 
student body and faculty oi the Uni- 
versity on April 27. 

The occasion was the annual spring 
convocation which was held in the 
Cole Activities Building. 

Senator Kennedy, a graduate ol 
Harvard University and the I ondon 
School of Economics, holds numerous 
honorary degrees from colleges anil 
universities. A noted writer, he was 
awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Biog- 



raphj in 1957. He is •> membei ol the 
I oreigrj Relations, and the I abor and 
Public Welfare < ommittees; and the 
Select ( ommittee on I aboi Man 
ment Relations ol the Senate 

\ ording i" B. lames Borreson, I \ 
ecutive Dean for Student Life and 
Chairman oi the University's Public 
Function Committee, the convocation 
was the first m a senes featuring leaders 

from government anil political life who 
will be invited to the campus during the 
next I 2 months. 

(Continued on page IV) 




They're prepared- 
how about you? 

They're learning to do the things that will make them well-rounded 
and useful citizens. In the meantime, they're depending on you . 
Now is the time to safeguard the future of your youngsters, and 
the rest of your family as well. We will be pleased to discuss with 
you and your attorney the many advantages of creating a First 
National Trust Fund either during your lifetime or by your will. 

FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK of Baltimore 

Main Office: Light & Redwood • Offices throughout Baltimore area • Member FDIC 



IAY-JUNE, 1959 







Vr O/P 



n 




THE Til 







TER CONFERENCE 






S 





EATED AROUND A CONFERENCE TABLE RECENTLY, IN THE 

>eautiful Gold Room of the Tidewater Inn. Easton, Mary- 
and. were 30 of the University's key figures in instruction. 
Jrought together for the two-day Conference on Instruction, 
tfarch 16 and 17, the group met in an effort to consider the 
nstructional program throughout the University. 

Seminar-type sessions were scheduled for the morning, 
ifternoon. and evening of March 16 and for the morning and 
ifternoon of March 17. Attending the meetings were rep- 
esentatives from all the schools and colleges on both the 
Jaltimore and College Park campuses: persons in a position 
o make an excellent assessment of the present instructional 
>rogram and to make recommendations for any change of 
lirection or emphasis. 

More than a year of planning went into arranging the Con- 
erence. The preliminary work was carried out jointly by the 
ienate Committee on Instructional Procedures, Dr. Ronald 
Jamford, Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman; and by 
he Office of the Dean of the Faculty, Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, 
Dean. The location of the Conference, the types of sessions, 
ind the topics for consideration were all chosen with an eye 
o encouraging the greatest possible freedom of discussion. 
(Continued on next page) 




T 




T. 



HI OPINING si SSION TOOK UP THE 

subject "The Uniqueness of a Disci- 
pline in Terms ot its Organizing Princi- 
ples and its Instructional Procedures." 
A representative of each of seven disci- 
plines was asked to discuss the organiz- 
ing principles which make his discipline 
unique and to identity the teaching 
methods most appropriate for com- 
municating these principles. It was 
generally recognized that there is no 
"universal" teaching method: the dis- 
cussion led to an appreciation of a 
variety of problems related to teaching 
Maryland students. 

The Second General Session, held 
the afternoon of March 16. took up 
the topic "The University Professor and 
Instruction." Dr. John Gustad. Head 
of the University of Maryland Coun- 
seling Center, presented a report of a 
Stud) he had made last year in which 
college-level teachers were asked to 
evaluate their teaching experience in 
relation to certain specified factors. 
Reactions, discussion and questions 
from the participants followed the re- 
port together with suggestions pertain- 
ing to the preparation of college teach- 
ers. 

The evening o\ March 16 was de- 
voted to preparing tor panel presenta- 
tions to he given the following day. 
The four panels presented the following 
topics the morning of March 17: 1 ) 
How can we broaden the base of 
evaluating student achievement' 2) 
What are some o\ the unique problems 
ot instructing in the lower division 
area? 3) What are some approaches to 
determining the effectiveness ol instruc- 
tion? 4) What are some o\ the respon- 
sibilities o\ senior faculty members in 
aiding junior faculty members' \la\ 
the senior faculty member gain some- 
thing in the process? 



HI IISU Sl SSIOS si SIMM) IP THE 

proceedings with "Some Implications of 
the Conference tor Instruction at the 
University ol Maryland." The partici- 
pants felt that this first conference 
meeting should be followed by depart- 
mental and college level seminars ol a 
similar nature in order to examine the 
specific instructional problems within 
a single discipline. Interest in this pro- 
gram was so keen that throughout the 
entire two days of the Conference, 
participants literally talked of nothing 
else. In small groups, in private dis- 
cussions, during coffee breaks, and at 
meals, all talk centered on factors re- 
lated to instruction. 

In attendance at the Conference 
were: Dr. Emory C. Leffel. Dr. Robert 
W. Krauss. and Dr. Paul Poffenberger 
from the College of Agriculture: Dr. 
Leon W. Cohen. Dr. Harold Ho!fsom- 
mer. Dr. Aubrey C. Land. Dr. Howard 
Laster. Dr. Charles Manning. Dr. 
Charles Murphy. Dr. Carl L. Rollinson. 
and Dr. George VV. Wharton from the 
College of Arts & Sciences: Dean 
Ronald Bamford from the Graduate 
School: Dr. Allan G. Gruchy. Dr. Guy 
B. Hathorn. and Dr. Leroy L. Lee from 
the College of Business & Public Ad- 



ministration: Dr. Kenneth Hovet ar 
Dr. Gladys Wiggin from the Collej 
of Education; Dr. Henrv R. Reed ar 
Professor Charles A. Shreeve. Jr.. fro 
the College of Engineering: Profess^ 
Pela F. Braucher and Dean Selrr 
Lippeatt from the College of Horn 
Economics: Colonel Henry A. Walkt! 
from the Department of Air Scienoj 
Dr. Benjamin Massey and Dr. Doroth 
R. Mohr from the College of Physic; 
Education. Recreation and Health: D 
D. V. Provenza from the School c 
Dentistry: Professor Russell Reno frork 
the School of Law; Dr. Charles Va 
Buskirk from the School of Medicine 
Dr. Casimir Ichniowski from th 
School of Pharmacy: and Dr. Mar 
Carl from the School of Nursing. Mi 
B. James Borreson. Executive Dea 
Student Life, also visited some of th 
sessions. 

President Wilson H. Elkins and \lr> 
Elkins attended the Opening Sessior 
President Elkins expressed his extrem 
interest in the improvement of instruc 
tion and he urged the faculty to cor 
tinue to seek ways of carrying on th 
educational enterprise more effective!;. 

Mr. Richard Stottler. Director o 
Institutes, coordinated the Confer. 



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Housing Committee of 
Congress Hears Expert 
Testimony by Prominent 
Maryland Alumnus, '40 



SVMIEL J. LEFRAK, NEW YORK 
alumnus of Maryland, recently 
testified in Washington as the leading 
speaker in the Federal government's 
current study of housing legislation. 

As one of the foremost builders in 
the United States, Mr. Lefrak was 
invited early this year to present his 
expert views to the Housing Sub- 
committee of the Senate and House 
Banking Currency Committees. His 
report to these groups outlined a four- 
pronged plan to expedite the Nation's 
urban renewal program and emphasized 
government aid for urgently-needed, 
privately-constructed middle-i n c o m e 
housing. The report was received 
enthusiastically by government leaders 
and led to the passing of the Omnibus 
Housing Bill for $2,300,000,000. 

Mr. Lefrak has come into prominence 
since graduation not only for the sub- 
stantial industrial growth for which he 
has been responsible but for his grow- 
ing role in civic and philanthropic 
activities. 

At 41, Samuel Lefrak is President 
af an organization which has built 
nore than 400 skyscrapers within the 
Greater New York City area. For the 
seriod 1959-60, the Lefrak Organiza- 
ion anticipates a construction budget 
:xceeding $100,000,000. 

In the philanthropic field, he is the 
>rganizer of the Lefrak Foundation 
vhich has already disbursed hundreds 
)f thousands of dollars for human wel- 
fare without regard to race, color or 
:reed of the recipients. He has built 
ind sponsored a number of charitable 
:nterprises including houses of worship, 
;chools, community centers and hos- 
)itals. 



A 1940 graduate majoring in Com- 
merce, Mr. Lefrak was a member of the 
International Relations Club. He 
served four years with the Varsity 
Track Team, was President of the 
Latch Key Society, was elected an 
officer of the Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity, 
and became a member of the "M" Club 
for his inter-collegiate competition. He 
was also a chairman of the Senior 
Prom Committee, member of the 
Opera Club, the M Book organiza- 
tion and the Wrestling Team. 

In the 19 years since his graduation, 
Mr. Lefrak's appearance and manner 
have not changed. A recent photograph 
showing him with a scale mode'l of 
Lefrak Tower, an ultra-modern, 12- 
story office structure planned for 
Queens, compares with the one made 
for and published in the Terrapin: 
sandy hair, alert eyes, a ready smile. 



LEFRAK TOWER IS ONE OF THE 
structures planned by the Lefrak 
Organization for 1959-60 and will serve 
as the home office for the huge con- 
struction and development company. 
Others are a 62-alley Bowlerama, one 
of the largest on the East Coast, and a 
series of apartment houses in Brooklyn. 
Also planned are three new buildings 
and a shopping center in King's Bay 
and a huge middle-income project on 
Sheepshead Bay. Currently under con- 
struction in Queens are the 14-story 
Park Vendome, the 1 1 -story Park 
Chateau and the 11 -story Park Plaza. 
These buildings are expected to be 




Samuel J. Lefrak 



completed this year, along with the 
Forest Hills Plaza comprising the 13- 
story Brussels and Marseilles. Active 
branch offices are maintained in key 
cities throughout the country. 

Chief among the numerous social, 
governmental and civic organizations 
with which he has served, have been 
his membership with the United States 
Committee of the United Nations Or- 
ganization, the Young President's Or- 
ganization, the Board of Directors of 
the Citizens Housing and Planning 
Council of New York, the People-to- 
People Sports Committee formed to 
develop international understanding 
through an exchange of athletes. He 
has also been vice-president of the As- 
sociated Builders of Greater New York 
for the past ten years. Chairman of 
the Queens Advisory Commission on 
Economic Development, Trustee and 
member of the Board of Directors for 
the Jewish Chronic Disease Hospital 
and Trustee and Director of the Ad- 
visory Board for Beth-El Hospital, and 
Overseas Advisor to the State of Israel 
in matters pertaining to construction 
and building. 

Mr. Lefrak has been in the fore- 
front of many philanthropic programs: 
the Community Chest, B'nai Brith, 
Cerebral Palsy, Red Cross, Damon 
Runyon Fund, Infantile Paralysis, 
YMCA, the Boy Scouts of America, 
the Heart Fund and the National 
Jewish Hospital at Denver. 

For his outstanding services on be- 
half of orthopedically handicapped 
children. Mr. Lefrak was awarded the 
1957 Award as Outstanding Business- 
man of the Year, by the New York 
Philanthropic League. 



(AY-JUNE. 1959 



9 




B 

1. 




jfi 






MARYLAND 
PLANS AND 
BUILDS FOR THE 

FUTURE 



MARYLAND, SIGHTING TEN AND TWENTY YEARS AHEAD. Is 
planning and building for the future now. 

State appropriations for capital improvements have been 
expended at about a $2,000.00()-a-year clip for the past 
several years: in 1959-60 they will increase to more than 
S3. 000.000. 

The faces of the College Park and Baltimore campuses 
change month by month. Perhaps, the frequent comment 
expressed by returning alumni concerns changes brought 
about by the erection of new buildings. But the campus is 
not simply changing: Maryland is developing into a great 
university. 

The reason for this tremendous, albeit orderly development. 
is the challenge assigned to higher education across the 
nation, a challenge always present, now newly declared. 

Reduced to its simplest equation it is a rapidly advancing 
society which produces more college-eligible men and women 
(enrollments in state universities throughout the country are 
expected to more than double in the next two decades) and 
which demands a more efficient and knowledgable educa- 
tional apparatus. 

One of the more basic problems confronting your State 
University is that of providing adequate space for expanding 
programs and enrollment. SuDervising the growth of 
physical facilities is George O. Weber. Director of the 
Physical Plant and Supervising Engineer. A graduate of 
the University (mechanical engineering '33), Mr. Weber has 
served as Physical Plant Director since 1946. He and his 
staff are constantly at work to help provide the building 
facilities so urgently required on both the College Park and 
Baltimore campuses. 

The value of buildings constructed in 1958 was 
$2,027,631.38. Already completed this year are two build- 
ings at a cost of $602,700.00; an additional $1,428,249.00 
will be spent in the construction of buildings to be com- 
pleted this year. Approximately $2,570,000.00 will be ex- 
pended for the construction of two buildings expected to be 
completed in 1960. 

A $3,093,100.00 University of Maryland capital improve- 
ment budget for the academic year 1959-60 has been ap- 
proved by the Maryland General Assembly, recently ad- 
journed. 

The Baltimore campus will receive $1,010,600.00 for the 
purchase of building sites and land use planning in general 
campus development, and $243,500.00 will go into projects 
at Maryland State College at Princess Anne. 

(Continued on next page) 




11 




oi it,, (.000.00 ipproved tor the College I* «rk 

campus, $1,134,000.00 will be used to construct a new 
dormitor) foi men, .md tor the first phase ol an attached 
dining hall unit. Othei approved funds include $125,000.00 
to cqmp the new ( ollege ol Business and Public Administra- 
tion building, $440,000.00 tor the construction ol a new 
muic Building tor the ( ollege ol \ns and Sciences, 
hi on ior renovations and an addition to raliaferro Hall. 
Uld $100,000.00 to reinforce and extend underground 
utilities 



Ml II DINGS ( OMP1 l II I) IN L958 

1 . Cecil Hall 

( oat: $281,260.00. 
Purpose: Dormitor) tor men 

( apacit) : 1 22. 

Architect Walton & Madden. 

( ontractor: Built and owned b) the Universit) ol Mary- 
land. 

Si/e 22,335 square feet. 

Building Materials: Concrete structural frame: masonrv 
exterior walls; wood frame root; slate shingles: heat- 
ing from central plant. 

2. Dorchester Hall 

( ost: $503,500.00. 

Purpose: Dormitory for women. 
( apacit] : 178. 

Architect: Johannes & Murray. 
( ontractor: Dorset Construction Company. 
Size: 35,978 square feet. 

Building materials: Concrete structural frame: masonry 

walls and partitions: wood frame roof: slate shingles: 

heating from central plant. 

note: building costs include architects' fees but 

are 1 \( 1 i sl\e of equipm1 n i xm> i i rnish1ngs. this note 

applies to all cost figures. 

3. Alpha Gamma Delta House 
Cost: SI 02.652. 50. 
Purpose: Sorority house. 

ipacity: 40. 
Architect: Aubinoe. Beery & Edwards. 
( ontractor: Briggs Construction Company. 
Size: 10.459 square feet. 
Building materials: Wall bearing masonr\ exterior: first 

tloor. concrete on steel joists: other floors wood joists; 

wood stud partitions: wood frame roof: slate shingles: 

gas-fired heating system. 

4. Building Construction Shop (Princess Anne) 
( ost $55,000.00. 

Purpose: Classroom and Laboratory Building. 
Architect: University ol Maryland. 

5. Dunning Hall. The School of Pharmacy Building 
( ost $684,679.00. 

Purpose: ( lassroom, laboratory and office facilities tor 

the School, 
hitect: William S. Stone. Jr. 
( ontractor: Baltimore Contractors, Inc. 

Si/e 1 ),600 square feet. 

Building materials: Reinforced concrete faced with brick 
and ornamented with limestone and granite. 



6 hilehursl Hall. The School of Nursing Building 

( ost S400.539.88. 

Purpose: leaching and administrative activities of t 

School. 
Architect: William S. Stone. Jr. 
( ontractor: Bickerton and Wheeley. Inc. 
Si/e: 21.500 square feet. 
Building materials: Reinforced concrete with bri 

exterior using granite and limestone trim. 

BUILDINGS COMPLETED IN 1959 

! Worcester Hall 
( ost $455,700.00. 

Purpose: Dormitory for women. 

Capacit) : 156. 

Architect: led Englehardt. 

Contractor: Hill & Kimmel. 

Size: 33.595 square feet. 

Building Materials: concrete structural frame: mason« 

partitions and walls: wood frame roof: slate shingW 

heating from central plant. 

2. Faculty Apartments (Princess Anne) 
Cost: SI 47.000.00. 
Purpose: Apartments for instructors. 
Architect: William Calder Harris. 

BUILDINGS TO BE COMPLETED IN 1959 

1. Alpha Chi Omega House 
Cost: SI 26.623.00. 
Purpose: Sorority house. 
Capacity: 39. 

Architect: Charles W. Lessig and William M. Hauss 

mann. 
Contractor: Furman Builders. 
Size: 9.987 square feet. 
Building materials: Wall bearing masonr\ e\ti 

first floor, pre-cast concrete joists: concrete 

second floor, concrete on steel joists: steel and 

roof frames: slate shingles. 

2. Physical Sciences Lecture Hall 
Cost: $300,000. 

Purpose: Classroom and lecture hall building. 
Capacity: Lecture hall. 368 seats: lecture hall. 132 

classroom. 50 seats. 
Architect: Howard G. Hall and Associates. 
Contractor: ColemanAVood. Inc.. Silver Spring. 
Size: Outside dimensions. 81 feet by 102 feet. 
Building Materials: Reinforced concrete and steel. 

exterior walls with cinder block back-up. ci 

block interior partitions, steel deck with built-up n 

over I 'a insulation. 

Medical Science Library 

( ost: S1.42S. 249.00. 

Purpose: Library. 

Architect: John Carroll Dunn. 

( ontractor: Baltimore Contractors. Inc. 

Si/e: 70,500 square feet. 

v iting capacity: 400; auditorium seats 416. 

\ olume capacit) : 200. ooo. 

Building materials: Reinforced concrete structure 





steel Ik'.uiis above the auditorium; exterioi walls ol 
buck with Indiana limestone and granite trim; main 
lobbj ol St, < laire golden vein marble and ["ravertine 
Hours; wood panelling in various rooms of Honduras 
Mahogany. 

IN ADDITION TO lllosi BUILDINGS lisill) IN OUR 
Construction report, there are two facilities scheduled for 

completion in i960. A new building lor the College of 

Business and Public Administration will be erected on the 
College Park campus, to be available for occupancy during 
the tall term of I960. An appropriation of $1,550,000 was 
voted tor this project by the 1957 session of the legislature, 
which amount added to the $20,000 planning funds voted in 
1956. makes SI. 570, 000 total funds available for construction, 
exclusive of equipment. The five-story building is of fire 
proof design with a concrete frame, masonry curtain walls. 
wood double hung windows and slate roof. It has been 
planned with the traditional colonial exterior treatment. A 
total of 34 classrooms and labs and a large lecture hall to 
seat 430 persons is provided. Office suites for the Dean and 
eight subordinate departments of the College are included. 

Construction continues on the Union-Dormitory Building 
on the Baltimore campus. Although ultimate structure will 
be K-shaped. the initial construction will be limited to one- 
half of the K. The building will be located on the southwest 
corner of Lombard and Greene Streets. Its cost is ap- 
proximately $1,000,000. 

Early in June, excavation was begun for the new Medical 
Science Library building at the southeast corner of Lombard 
and Greene Streets. In official ceremonies, the Governor of 
Maryland and the President of the University broke ground 
with silvered shovels, while an interested crowd of spectators 
( including the librarians who will eventually occupy the 
building) looked on. There were representatives from each 
of the four schools — Medicine. Dentistry, Pharmacy, and 
Nursing — which will be served by the library of medical 
sciences in the new building. 

In July and August progress was greatly retarded by prob- 
lems arising from sand under the surface, and extensive 
reinforcing with concrete was found necessary. Once this 
slow process was completed, more promising construction 
began to take shape. At the end of October, the basic 
modular plan of the building was evident with concrete 
pillars beginning to show every 24 feet on the lowest floor 
level, the shaft of the elevator in view, and outlines of the 
auditorium clearly defined. 

There is an interesting sidelight concerning the Physical 
Sciences Lecture Hall now being built at College Park. The 
contracting firm of Coleman-Wood, Inc. is owned and 
operated by Tracy and Tom Coleman (Mr. Wood is no 
longer connected with the firm), both of whom are Uni- 
versity graduates. Tracy, who holds a bachelor's degree in 
civil engineering, is an alumnus of the year 1935. His brother 
is a 1940 graduate who also has a B.S. in civil engineering. 
Both men were active in University affairs while they were 
students: Tracy was president of his class each year for four 
years; Tom was president of his class in his junior year and 
also president of the Student Government Association. 
Tracy is married to the former Virginia Ijams, Ed. '35. Tom 
is married to the former Matilda Boose, Ed. '39. Tom's 
daughter, Virginia Anne, is presently a student at the Uni- 
versity, majoring in education. 



-JUNE. 1959 



13 




Dr. Younger Inspires 
Establishment of an 
ENGINEERS 
MEMORIAL 
FUND 



/ > ) 



P vun \M> STUDENTS RETURNING TO COLLEG1 PARK 

after the ( bristmas vacation were shocked and saddened to 
hear ol the passing of Dr. John E. Younger. Chairman of the 
Department oi Mechanical Engineering. Doc", as he was 
affectionate!) called In all the students and tacultv members 
who knew him. was highly regarded bv all those with whom 
he came in contact I he students admired and respected 
him as .1 friend and a tine and able teacher and the faculty 
tor his honest) and integrity . 

Dr. Younger's contributions to the field of aircraft struc- 
tural design has had a profound influence on modern aviation. 
He was responsible for two oi the most important develop- 
ments in that field: monocouue structures and pressure cabins 
tor high-altitude operation. While a member of the faculty 
ot the University of California he was granted a leave of 
absence 1927-1930 to pertorm research at Wright Field as 
Senior Aeronautical Project Engineer. There, he developed 
the initial basic research into monocoque construction on 
which the design oi the revolutionary Martin XB-10 was 
based 1 his airplane was taster than the fighter planes of 
Its d.\\ . 

Prom 1935 to 1937 Dr. Younger again was assigned to 
Wright field. I his time he was in complete responsible charge 
ol organizing and supervising the research program in pres- 
sure cabins for aircraft which won the Collier Trophv for 
the U.S. Army Air Force ( ls>3<S) for the first pressure cabin 



high altitude airplane. He was credited as being responsit! 
lor the technical aspects of this development. 

In 1938 Doc came to College Park as Chairman of t] 
Department of Mechanical Engineering. In 1945. he aga 
returned to W right Field, this time on leave of absence frof 
the University of Maryland to initiate a research program f 
developing high-speed thin wings for jet-propelled aircra 
He published a number of research papers and seven tex 
the most recent of which was Advanced Dynamics, publishi 
in I ebruary last year. 

His most significant honor was the Spirit of St. Louis do 
Medal awarded "for meritorious service in the advancement 
aeronautics." The previous recipients had been Dani 
Ciuggenheim. Paul Litchfield. Will Rogers, and James I 
Doolittle. Doc often said that he thought his students we 
more proud of this award than he. 

ether with his outstanding ability and well-desem 
fame as a scientist and engineer. Dr. Younger was still 
verv warm and friendly person. Because of these qualiti. 
he was admired and respected by his students. 

With Doctor Younger's passing it was suggested that 
memorial fund be established in his name. It was decide 
that a general fund would be of interest to all in the Collej 
of Engineering. The name "The Faculty -Alumni Memori 
Fund of the College of Engineering" was selected so as t 
include all the departments of the College of Engineers 
and permitting donations to the fund in the memory of an 
one the donor may designate. The fund will be used U 
projects strengthening the College of Engineering in thoi 
areas in which other support is not adequate, such as stt 
dent aid. faculty development and research, and specit 
library collections. The projects will be carefully selected I 
provide the most effective possible support under the guidanc 
of a committee of faculty and representatives of the Eng 
neering Alumni Board of Directors. It is proposed th. 
suitable memorial plaques will be dedicated as part of th 
program. A substantial start has already been made in th 
establishment of the fund. Contributions have already bee 
received from students, faculty and friends of Dr. Youngc 
Until such time as the mechanism of the fund is establish^ 
contributions in the form of checks made payable to th 
University of Maryland. For Engineers Memorial Fund i 

memory of , can be sent t 

Professor C. R. Hayleck. Jr.. Department of Mechanic. 
Engineering. University of Maryland. College Park. Man 
land, or by designating the fund when contributing to th 
current Greater University of Maryland Fund. 



Alumni Participation in Fund Shows Sharp Upsurge 



VlORl 1II\S 1,600 LOY Al \1 I MM ARE ACTIV I 1 v. I'VKTICIPAT- 

ing m the l ( ^ l > Genera] ( amass ot the Greater Universin ol 
Maryland Fund I his compares with the 1,000 persons who 
tiHik part in the program last year. 

Mounting alumni interest and enthusiasm is also evident in 
the increase in the number of contributors. As of Mav 1. 
contributors numbered more than 2.400; at the same time last 
vear onl) 1,650 bad contributed to the Fund. Gifts and 
pledges received up to Mav I exceeded $50,000. 

I he 1958 opening vear ot the Fund was one of the best 
ever recorded b\ a state university alumni fund program. The 

14 



tact that, based on comparative May 1 records in 1958 am 
this year, the number of Fund workers has increased by ri0 f < 
and the number of contributors by more than 45 9c . makes th 
Fund seem to be well on its way to a second successful year 
Objectives of the 1959 program are: 1) Establish at 
Alumni Student Aid Fund: 2) Provide furnishings for th» 
Baltimore Union-Dormitory (see third column, next page) 
3 ) Support special library collections for the McKeldn 
Library at College Park and the Medical Sciences Librar 
now under construction in Baltimore: 4) Aid faculty de 
velopment and achievement. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Pre -Commencement Activities 



in Full Swing 




ONE 01 I HI MORI CER1 UN SIGNS 
of spring on both the College 
Park and Baltimore campuses is the 
pre-commencement awards meeting 
sponsored by the various schools and 
colleges. 

M.m\ of these activities concern 
alumni. The first such alumni event of 
the season was the annual banquet of 
the Alumni Association oi the School 
ol I aw, held April I 1 at the Sheraton- 
Belvedere Hotel in Baltimore. The 
main purpose of the occasion is to 
welcome the senior class to member- 
ship in the Association and to present 
honors and awards. (For a full write- 
up of the proceedings, see the School of 
Law column). 

Another highlight of the early 
spring was the commencement program 
of the Division of Practical Nursing. 
School of Nursing, which took place 
March 31. Dr. Gladys A. Wiggin, 
Professor of Education at the Uni- 
versity was the featured speaker for the 
occasion and Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, 
Dean of the Faculty, presented the 
certificates. Graduating were Bertha 
Alston. Mildred Baker, Rosa Cham- 
bers. Renee Colvin, Bonnie Crews, 
Argena Freeman. Mary Graham, Jean 
Jackson, Dorothy Kendall, Warren 
Keyes. Bernice Lawson, Mary Lay- 
poldt. Winona Lofton, Betty Moore, 
Dorothy Norris. Aldona Packal, Evelyn 
Ross. Elizabeth Schrenzel. Mary Ann 
Stern. Hazel Todd, and Mary Wilson. 

The School of Pharmacy held open 
house April 10 for alumni, high school 
students, and others interested in 
pharmacy. The theme of the program, 
"Education and Research in Pharmacy," 
featured a large number of exhibits 
placed in Dunning Hall and in the 
Pharmacy-Dentistry Building. 

College Park got into the spring 
swing with a campus-wide round of 
activities May 9 — the second annual 
Alumni Day — which centered on Class 
Reunions and the Alumni-Varsity Foot- 
ball Game. The College of Engineering 
celebrated its one-hundredth anniver- 
sary that day with an open house in 
the morning. The College of Home 
Economics sponsored a special program 
with members of the 1959 graduating 
class and faculty members of the Col- 



lege as honor guests. A lull report 
of the day's activities will be carried in 
the July-August issue. 



ON THE BALTIMORE CAMPUS, THE 
academic year closes with a burst 
of pre-commencemcnt activities. 

The School of Dentistry leads off on 
June 4 with a convocation of Omicron 
Kappa Upsilon membeis at the Lord 
Baltimore Hotel. The Dental Alumni 
meet June 4-5 for reunions, profes- 
sional meetings, and a Golf Tourna- 
ment. Their ladies will be entertained 
by a Heritage Tour of Annapolis. 

June 4 is also the day set by the 
School of Pharmacy and the School of 
Pharmacy Alumni Association for the 
annual banquet honoring the 1959 
graduating class. 

The School of Nursing Alumnae 
have scheduled their annual banquet 
and dance from 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. on 
Friday, June 5 in the Main Ballroom 
of the Emerson Hotel. This affair is 
given in honor of the graduating class 
and is a night when class reunions are 
recognized. 

Culminating the 152nd year of the 
School of Medicine, the Medical 
Alumni Association will celebrate its 
annual alumni day on Thursday, June 
4. 

Registration will be held in Chemical 
Hall at 9:00 a. m. at which time coffee 
and buns will be served. 

At 10 o'clock, and also in historical 
Chemical Hall, a scientific program will 
be held under the sponsorship of the 
Class of 1934. This will be entitled 
"What Has Happened in the Past 
Twenty-Five Years." At 11:00 a.m. 
there will be a short business meeting 
which will include the presentation of 
the annual Alumni Honor Award Gold 
Key to Dr. Edgar B. Friedenwald, of 
the Class of 1903. There will be a 
complimentary luncheon at 12:30 p.m. 

The afternoon will be customarily 
kept open by the association because of 
the frequency of individual class 
reunions and receptions. The annual 
banquet and dance with the presenta- 
tion of the fifty year certificates will be 
held at the Lord Baltimore Hotel at 
6:30 p.m. 




rullllMIO II IHI AlUMhi AVIOCIAHON 
Ol IMl IALIIUOII COUIGI OF 0IMTAI Wlbtlt 

0INIAI SLNOOl UNlWIIVir, Of MAIfkAN 



Above is the (over of Volume One 
Number One of mi alma mater, new 
publication of the Alumni Association of 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery — 
School of Dentistry, University of Mary- 
land. 

The ai ma mater will be distributed 
twice a year tin January and in May) to 
approximately 4,000 dentists in 26 coun- 
tries. Comment concerning this first issue 
is carried in the School of Dentistry 
section of this issue of THE MARY1 \\i> 
MAGAZINE. 




Long-anticipated dormitory facilities for 
the Baltimore campus are soon to become 
a reality. 

In the photograph to the left. Dr. Al- 
bert E. Goldstein, General Chairman of 
the Greater University of Maryland Fund, 
views plans for the five-story Union- 
Dormitory expected to be completed in 
February, next year. Designed to house 
some 198 students, the outside structure 
of the basement and two floors have al- 
ready been constructed. 

Furnishings for the building will be 
provided from $82,059 contributed to the 
Greater University of Maryland Fund 
Founder's program last year and from 
some $18,000 from 1959's Fund program. 



MAY-JUNE. 1959 



15 




/In Graduate Nursing Con- 

/ ,mi tire, left tO right, Dr. 

Elkins, Dean \4arjorie Huriliolf. Stluml of 
ng, I niversity of Texas; Dr Gene- 
K Pixler, Head o) SREB's Graduate 
ng Education Project; and Dr. Ro- 
bert ( Anderson, Directoi SREB 



200 Attend SREB 
Graduate Nursing 
Conference in 
Atlanta 

ABOI I 200 m RSING I Dl i vioks VND 
. administrators gathered in Atlanta. 
Georgia, from March 9-12 for a om 
week conference on "The Place oi 
Nursing m Higher Education." 

I he fourth General Conference on 
Graduate Education and Research in 
Nursing was sponsored by the South- 
ern Regional Education Board's proj- 
ect in Graduate Nursing Education, 
headed In Dr. Genevieve Bixler. 

Si\ southern universities are presently 

offering jointly planned master's de- 
gree programs in nursing. 1 he Uni- 
versity ot Maryland oilers a Master of 
Science degree with majors in Psychia- 
tric Nursing, Medical and Surgical 
\uisuii:. and Maternal and Child 

Health Plans are being made to in- 
clude the major fields ol Administration 
in Nursing Education and in Nursing 
Services m 1959-60. 

Maryland was represented in the 
three important groups which met 
prior to the general conference: ( 1 ) 

members Ol the Stale Hoard ol Nurs- 
ing who have the legal responsibility 
tor qualifying nurses for practice; (2) 
Presidents ol State 1 cagucs tor Nurs- 
ing; and (3) persons representing col- 
legiate nursing programs who belong 
to the associate memhei group ol the 
SREB regional nursing project. 

I>r Mar) K ( arl. Prolcssor and 

Chairman ol Graduate Programs in 

Nursing, look p. ut in a program dis- 
16 



cussing What it means to belong to a 
college or university faculty." 

I he Opening Session ot the general 
conference got underway at 2 p.m. on 
Wednesday, March 11. Following the 

welcoming address bv Dr. Robert ( . 
Andcison. Director, Southern Regional 
Education Hoard. Dr. Wilson H 

Elkins, President ot the University ot 

Maryland, was called upon to deliver 
the kevnote address. Dr. Elkins con- 
sidered the subject "I he Advancement 
ol the Profession Oi Nursing." In the 
summary Oi his remarks President 
1 Ikms said: 

I odav we stand at the threshold ol 
t uither revolutionary changes in the 
health sciences. The chains which once 
shackled the nursing profession have 
been thrown off, and the future is 
limited only by human resources: the 
colleges and universities have accepted 
the responsibility of educating all parts 
of the health group, and it is inevitable 
that nursing will receive increasing at- 
tention: the national organizations of 
nurses have been consolidated and re- 
placed by a structure designed for 
action in an enlightened age. Graduate 
education, so essential to the improve- 
ment of nursing education, has been 
encouraged by foundations and regional 
associations. 

"As a notable example, the Southern 
Regional Education Board has been a 
pioneer in this development, and we 
are indebted to this farsighted organiza- 
tion for the leadership it has provided 
in the development of graduate pro- 
grams in our Southern institutions of 
higher learning. It would be foolhardv 
lor each institution to attempt a com- 
prehensive graduate program, for this 
would mean the dilution of specific 
courses, even if it were economically 
feasible. You are in a unique position 
to follow the regional course to the 
development oi sound, sensible graduate 
studies, and all of us who sit on the 
sidelines applaud vour past efforts and 
look forward with hope to a future 
which can contribute immeasurably to 
the advancement of the profession of 
nursing and to human betterment." 

Dr. Florence M. Gipe. Dean of the 
I Diversity's School of Nursing, also 
took an active part in the Opening Ses- 
sion. In discussing support and budget. 
Dean Gipe stated: "Ours is like every 
other voung program. We had to get 
going. Hut we feel that we are getting 
better support each year ... I would 
s.iv ib.it the School of Nursing is faring 
iust about as well, in some cases better. 
than some oi the other schools in the 
University. I don't have any com- 
plaint." 



News from 
the Clubs 



I r'S GOOD NEWS ANYWHERE, ANYTIME 

a new alumni club is born. It is espe 
cially gratifying, not to say surprising, 
when a new club springs up overseas. 
last vear witnessed the addition 
European alumni club to the roster of 
clubs in the United States: this vear is 
greeted by a newly-formed club in 
Puerto Rico. 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, who was 
recently in San Juan. Puerto Rico, on 
behalf of the Greater University of 
Maryland Fund, reports that during his 
stay he initiated meetings which re- 
sulted in the formation of the Univer- 
sity of Marvland Alumni Association 
Club in Puerto Rico. At a luncheon 
meeting at the Swiss Chalet in San 
Juan. 40 men enthusiastically organized 
the new club and elected officers. 

President of the Puerto Rico club is 
Dr. J. R. Rolenson, Med. "16. Serving 
as Vice President is Dr. Jorge 
Munoz. D.D.S. Dr. Francesco Garcia. 
D.D.S., is the Treasurer; Dr. Miguel 
Alonso. Med. "32. is Secretarv. I he 
Executive Committee includes Dr 
Alberto J. Walsh; S. C. Streep. Ed. 41; 
Dr. Victor J. Montilla: Dr. Antonio 
Avuso. Law '22; and Leo B. Lathroum. 
Pharmacy. 

Mr. David L. Brigham. Director of 
Alumni Relations, has written to Dr 
Rolenson that "It is wonderful to know 
that you now have an organization 
which will not only encourage addi- 
tional interest in the Universitv but 
which will serve as a focal point for 
alumni activity in a section where such 
interest is greatly needed." 

Members of the new club, in addi- 
tion to those mentioned above are: Dr 
Fernando H. Janer; Dr. Rafael S 
Vazquez. Med. 19: Rogelio L. Ca| 
tanv. Lng. '07; D. Jose E. Bertran: Dr 
Agustin R. Laugier: Dr. Victor J. 
Momtilla: Francisco E. Oliveras, Med 
'57; Dr. E. Martinez Rivera: Mrs 
Streep. Ed. '41: Armando Saavedra: 
Mario R. Garcia Palmieri. Med. '51: 
Francisca Guerra. D.D.S. : Pilar Regue- 
ro: Walter J. Benavent. M. D.: Jose 
Munoz. B.P.A. '50: Dr. M. Rodriquez 
Ema; Joaquin Fernandez Carballo. 
D.D.S.: Dr. Manuel Espinosa: Dr. Luis 
M. Isales. Med. '43; Dr. Jose Pico. 
Med. '33: Oscar Nevares. Ag. '40; Dr. 
Joseph Aponte: D. J. A. Alvarez de 
C houdens. Med. '44; and R. Mendez 
Bryan. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Far East Commencement Graduates 37 



DOUGLAS MACARTHUR II, UNITED STATES AMBASSADOR TO 
Japan, stressed the importance of the rule of law during 
his major address at the 1959 University of Maryland Far 
East Division Commencement ceremonies held in Tokyo, 
Japan, on March 23rd. 

More than 1,000 distinguished guests attended the cere- 
monies during which 37 students, 36 military and one civilian, 
received their degrees, eight of which were conferred in 
absentia. Students, faculty, and dignitaries appeared in 
formal academic regalia, and the entire event was similar to 
the usual American university commencement ceremonial. 

Thirty-six bachelor's degrees and one master's degree were 
conferred by Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, Vice President of the Uni- 
versity, who flew to Japan for the occasion. Dean Ray 
Ehrensberger, of University College, presided. 

In recognition of his outstanding service in the foreign 
diplomatic corps of the United States. Ambassador Mac- 
Arthur was awarded an honorary doctor of laws. A special 
honored guest. Dr. Shinzo Koizumi, special advisor to the 
Crown Prince of Japan and former President of Keio Uni- 
versity, was awarded the honorary doctor of letters. Dr. 
M.ison G. Daly, Director of the University's Far East Divi- 
sion, read the citations for the honorary degrees. About 
Mr. Mac Arthur he said: "The two-year period that Mr. 
MacArthur has been United States Ambassador to Japan has 
seen the dynamic evolution of two great sovereign nations 
to their inevitable, full, and equal partnership linked by 
common responsibilities, dangers and opportunities. The 
guidance of policy in advancing and improving trade and 
economic confidence between Japan and the United States; 
the evolvement of a new security pact based on mutual 
defense and clearly defined international commitment; the 
fostering of joint Japan-American stimulation of economic 
progress in countries of south and southeast Asia; the 
encouragement and enlargement of inter-reaction between 
two rich, rewarding cultures all of these critical factors of 
partnership are already far advanced and tirelessly sustained 
by career diplomat, Douglas MacArthur II." 

Regarding Dr. Koizumi. Dr. Daly remarked: "This is a 
man who has worked to enlighten his people as a scholar 
and a university administrator, who continues in active 
service to his country, and to his Prince, and to the uni- 
versity of which he was President. This is a man who has 
earned the respect of scholars throughout the world, whose 
writings are extensive and important. This is a man who well 
knows the personal tragedy and horror of war, whose active 
mind seeks ways to permanent peace, justice, and freedom." 

The distinguished audience included 12 ambassadors to 



Japan, six Japanese university presidents, the chief justice of 
the Japanese supreme court, the superintendent of the 
Japanese Self-Defense Force Academy, and many other 
distinguished persons. 

The military representatives included high ranking Army, 
Air Force and Navy officers from Pacific Air Forces, Eighth 
Army/UNC Korea, United States Army Japan. Fifth Air 
Force, and the Military Advisory Assistance Group, Japan. 

The ceremonies were held in the Kudan Kaikan auditorium, 
just across the moat from the Emperor's palace in downtown 
Tokyo. The building was formerly used as FEAF Officers 
Club and Theatre. Music for the event was provided by the 
United States Army Japan Band, under the direction of 
CWO Chester H. Heinzel, and the Nippon Women's Uni- 
versity Chorus, under the direction of student conductor, 
Miss Ayako Moriwaki. 

Ambassador MacArthur said in his address that the very 
survival of mankind depends upon the solution of inter- 
national disputes through observances of moral justice based 
on law. He charged the graduates with dedicating their 
personal efforts toward that goal, and he urged support of 
the United Nations as the instrument for providing for peace- 
ful settlement of disputes and for peaceful change. He 
summed up his remarks, saying: 

"In conclusion may I say that it is the responsibility of 
all of us to help shape a secure world where there is peace 
with justice for all people. The great objective which I am 
suggesting, the accomplishment of world peace through the 
rule of law, is not easy. It calls for patience, forbearance, 
and a dedication to basic principles. It calls for the united 
support of all free men everywhere and most particularly of 
men and women like you, the members of this graduation 
class, who have prepared yourselves through study and 
effort to make your contribution to a better world: a world 
in which the rule of justice, through law, prevails. For in 
this, indeed, hinges the very survival of mankind." 

The average age of the 1959 graduates is just over 37 
years, all but two of the graduates are married, and they 
average 2.3 children each. They represent 22 states of the 
Union and only one is from the State of Maryland. Twenty- 
two of the graduates are stationed in Japan, seven in 
Okinawa, seven in Korea, and one in Taiwan. Twenty-five 
are Army, ten are Air Force, one is Navy, and one is a 
civilian — a woman Department of Army employee. 

The military ranks include eleven lieutenant colonels, 
seven majors, eleven captains, two lieutenants, one sergeant 
first class, one technical sergeant, two staff sergeants, and one 
airman first class. 



MAY- JUNE. 1959 



17 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR Sports Editor 






Varsity Teams Go on a Spring Flin^ 



M 



UtYLAND'S SPRING SPORTS PRO- 
gram is off to one ol its best starts in 
a long time. 

Nc.tr the halt-wav mark in the var- 
ious schedules, i the end of April), all 
five of the vanit) sports have impres- 
sive winning marks. On the weekend 
ol April IS. all five won their respective 
meets, the first such clean sweep in 
several years. 

I he baseball team has been the most 
pleasant surprise. H. Burton Shipley, 
in his 36th year coaching the Red and 
White nine, experienced his greatest 
thrill in coaching when his outstanding 
senior pitcher Dick Reitz of Bel Air 
pitched a perfect game April 9 on 
Shipley Field against Johns Hopkins. It 
was the first perfect game pitched in 
the history oi Maryland baseball which 
dates back to the first organized team 
in 1S93. The no-man-to-first has been 
the first collegiate perfect game hurled 
in 2() years. Shortstop Frank Copper. 
centerfielder Pat Clarke, and first base- 
man Don Brown have been the heavy 
hitters for the Terps in their dash to 
a first-place tie in the Conference with 
Wake Forest. Reit/ has won four and 
lost one. The loss was the season's 
opener to Connecticut. Shiplev's team 
has compiled a 6-2 record, winning 
their last five in a row. 

Jack Faber and Al Heag> have 
guided the lacrosse team to another 
winning mark with six victories against 
no defeats m collegiate stick piav . I hev 
lost the exhibition opener to the Mt. 
Washington Club ten. The hist half 
ol the schedule calls lor the important 
games with Navy, Armv. and Johns 
Hopkins. The Armv game. Mav 9. is 
a preliminary to the annual Varsity- 
Alumni football game and will be 
played at noon. 

Junior attackman Roger Cioss. lead- 
ing scorer to return from last years ten 
continues to set the pace for the Terp 
Stickmen. He has hit the nets tor 20 
goals and assisted on IS others. JetT 
Keating, another close attackman is 



close to Goss w ith 1 9 goals and 1 1 
assists The first midfield of Jerry 
Thelen. Ah Tiedemann. and Henry 
Stansburv has given the Terp team 
some of the best midfield play in recent 
years. 

Jim Kehoe's outdoor track team con- 
tinues to dominate the local scene as 
well as the East coast and South. Al- 
though he has had only two dual meets 
at this time, his team has performed 
brilliantly in drubbing Virginia. 121-10. 
and North Carolina. 91-40. Their next 
big test is the Penn Relays then a dual 
meet with Navv and Georgetown be- 
fore the Conference championships at 
South Carolina. Mav 8-9. 

The big scorer for the Terps has been 
Nick Kovalakides. Princeton. N. J. Nick 
scored 13 points in the Virginia meet 
and 11 against the Tar Heels. It was 
in the Carolina meet that he threw the 
javelin a fabulous 239 feet. 2 1 2 inches, 
a new University and Conference rec- 
ord. The toss was the fourth best in 
the nation this vear. He also throws 
the shot and discus. Sprinter Don 
Whitaker also has been one of the 
big stars this spring. Against North 
Carolina, he ran the 100-vard dash in 
9.7 seconds to set a new school mark 
and rank ninth in the nation. He also 
set a new school mark in the 220-yard 
dash with a sprint of 20.9 seconds 
which placed him seventh in the coun- 
try. One of the finest hurdlers in Terp 
history is sophomore Bill Johnson. He 
has posted a 14.3 in the high hurdles 
for sixth top mark in the country. 
Other top performers for Kehoe are 
Bjorn Anderson, held events: Butch 
Speigel, dashes; Larry Salmon, hurdles; 
Jim Starboard, hurdles; Tom Tait. high 
jump: Elliott Thompson, broad jump: 
and Frank Colavita. mile and half-mile. 
The golt team, led bv Del Beman 
has a 4-2-1 record with all four wins 
coming on the Ierps' new lS-hole 
course. Including matches plaved on 
the former home course of Prince 
George countrv club. Maryland has 
won 15 consecutive matches. Bill 



Dudley, the number two man on th 
squad holds the Marvland course recor 
with a four under par, 68. 

Doyle Royal's tennis team has a 6- 
record with a 2-1 ACC mark. Five c 
the six matches were won at homt 
Charles Abelson. sophomore from Ba 
timore. leads the Terps in the numbe 
one spot with Al Citrenbaum. anothe 
soph from Hyattsville. supplying at. 
ditional fine play. Seniors Tom Boa 
and Don Palmer of Bethesda are th 
other two stars for Roval's team. 






(Report on the AlumniA 'arsitv Foot 
game. Mav 9. in the next issue] 



Golf Course is 
Dedicated May 15 






M 



AY 15. 1959 Will. LONG BE RF 

membered as one of the real ret 
letter"' davs in the long and rich tradi 
tion of the Lniversitv oi Maryland. 

On that Friday afternoon. Dr. Wil- 
son H. Elkins. Lniversitv President 
will accept formally for the Lniversitv 
the new lS-hole golf course. The pres- 
entation of the course will be made 
bv Mr. B. Herbert Brown. Secretary of 
the University's Board of Regents and 
Chairman of the Athletic Committee of 
the Board. 

The dedication will be attended bv 
members of the Board of Regents. Of- 
ficers of the Administration and De.ms 
of all the Schools and Departments of 
the Lniversitv. the Athletic Council. 
head coaches of all v arsitv sports, presi- 
dents oi all leading student organiza- 
tions, members oi the "M" Club, the 
1 errapin Club, the Alumni Association, 
members of press, radio, and TV, and 
the presidents and pros of all countrv 
clubs in the Washington and Baltimore 
areas. Over 300 guests have been in- 
vited to the dedication ceremonies. 



18 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



X 



The beautiful nevi 18-hole golf 
ooursej located hm wesl of the campus, 
brings to the University another of its 
outstanding achievements in the Ad- 
ministration's efforts to make the Uni- 
versity a more attractive one. 

l he course is built over 200 rolling, 
wooded acres and already is rated by 
pros and greens keepers as one of the 
finest courses on the east coast. Along 
with the 18-hole course is a clubhouse, 
putting green, and driving range. The 
entire facility was constructed from 
Maryland's share of receipts derived 
trom the 1952 Sugar Bowl, and the 
1454 and 1956 Orange Bowl football 
games. 

I he facility will offer teaching and 
recreational services to the University 
community. Students, University 
faculty and staff and their families, and 
University alumni and their families 
are permitted unrestricted playing 
privileges. 

Construction of the course began in 
June 1955. George Cobb was appointed 
architect and the construction superin- 
tendent was Alexander Pierce, who now 
is course superintendent. All construc- 
tion was handled by the University 
through the office of George Weber, 
head of the Physical Plant. 

The first nine holes opened for play 
July 1. 1959 and the second nine, 
August 22, 1959. More than 250 stu- 
dents use the course and range daily. 
On week-ends, the number rises to ap- 
proximately 500. Attendance in the 
near future by all users is expected to 
reach between 1,700 — 1,800 as the 
reason gets underway. 

The course record to date for 18 
holes is 68, held by Bill Dudley, a 
junior and member of the University 
golf team. The record for nine holes 
is 31, held by Carl Lohren a junior 
member of the golf team. 

Frank Cronin. a 1939 graduate of 
the University and an Associate Profes- 
sor of Physical Education, and varsity 
golf coach, has been appointed director 
of the golf course. 



Following is a schedule of events 
for the dedication: 

11:30 AM— Buffet Luncheon 

12:30 PM — Opening remarks and 
presentation by Mr. B. 
Herbert Brown Accept- 
ance by Dr. Wilson H. 
Elkins, University Presi- 
dent 

1:00 PM— Tee-Off 

MAY-JUNE, 1959 



Campus Notes 

Continual from page s 



Bosweli ro Receivi E\ i ning 
Star Trophy 
Harry A. Bosweli. Jr., '42. Vice Presi- 
dent of the University oi Maryland 

Alumni Association, was recently nomi- 
nated by the Prince Georges County 
Civic Federation to receive the Eve- 
ning Star Trophy for Civic Achieve- 
ments in 1958. Winning over John 
Marburger in a close race, Mr. Bosweli 
will receive the trophy at the May meet- 
ing of the federation. Mr. Bosweli, who 
is an attorney, realtor, and civic planner, 
has long been active in many civic ac- 
tivities. He is presently most active on 
the County Economic Development 
Committee; acts as Chairman of the 
County's regional Committee of the 
Health and Welfare Council. He is also 
Vice President of the Metropolitan 
Washington Health and Welfare Coun- 
cil. 

Governor Tawes Joins SREB 
Governor J. Millard Tawes is one of 
six newly-elected governors to join the 
Southern Regional Education Board. 
He will remain on the Board through- 
out his tenure in office. 



College of 

AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 



Portrait of an Alumnus 
J. Homer Remsberg, '18, is his name. 
Dairy farming is his profession. Partic- 
ipation in organizations is his hobby. 
Middletown Valley, Frederick County, 
Maryland is his home. 

Born on a Middletown Valley farm 
in 1897. Homer has put a lifetime of 
creative effort into that same farm and 
activities related to it. The farm, his 
home, has been in the family for five 
generations. In addition to the home 
place, he and a son operate two other 
farms in the area. 

Mr. Remsberg has chalked up an 
amazing record in community affairs, 
farming and agricultural organizations. 
In 1922, he helped to organize the 
Frederick County Holstein Cattle As- 
sociation and continuously has served 
as its Secretary-Treasurer. The next 
stepping stone was President of the 



Maryland Holstein I riesian Association 
where be served as President for ten 
years. 

ihiough time he has held offices in 
the Grange, Masonic Order and Ameri- 
can I egion. Also locally he finds time 
to direct the music and serve as an 
I Ulei in Ins church. 

(lose to Homer's heart are the activ- 
ities of the University of Maryland 
where he has served on many commit- 
tees and offices of the Alumni Associa- 
tion including its President. He has 
been a very active member of the 
Terrapin Club and held the office of 
Vice President. 




Mr. Remsberg 

Presently Mr. Remsberg is President 
of the Maryland and Virginia Milk 
Producers Association. He has served 
continuously as a director of that As- 
sociation for over 30 years. He is 
President of the Purebred Dairy Cattle 
Association of America, and is Treas- 
urer of the National Milk Producers 
Federation and on January 2, 1959, he 
was appointed a Director of the Farm 
Credit Bank of Baltimore. 

The University of Maryland pre- 
sented Homer a Certificate of Merit for 
distinguished service in Agriculture in 
1948 and in 1954 he was awarded the 
title "Man of the Year in Maryland" 
by the Progressive Farmer Magazine. 

The Remsbergs have four children, 
Mrs. Carol Bare, '42 Home Economics, 
Jack. '51. is married and in business 
with his father, and Adrian "Mac", '57, 
is in Naval Intelligence. 

Alumni are Rotary Officers 

Two alumni of the University of Mary- 
(Continued on next page) 

19 



land have been honored b) Rotar) In- 
ternational, world-wide service club 
nization. 

i fean I I esher, 73, Merced, c ali- 
fornia, is Governoi i>i districl s 22 i>t 
Rotar) Internationa] foi the 193 
iis^.ii year, and Charles P Wilhelm, 
Kingwood, West Virginia, is Gov- 
ernoi ol distt \t district <-«o\- 
ernors, Leshei and Wilhelm will visit 
each i>i the Rotar) clubs m their d;s- 
tricts 10 offer advice and assistance in 
Rotar) service activities and administra- 
tion 

John W Dorsey, Jr., '58, Sharpsburg, 
Maryland, is one ol 126 outstanding 
students from 35 countries studying 
abroad during the 1958-59 academic 
\c.ir .is Rotary Foundation Fellows. 
Dorse) is studying economics at the 
I niversit) ol London, England, and 
was sponsored lor the fellowship b) the 
Rotar) Club of Hagerstown, Maryland. 

I esher is publisher of the Merced 
Sun-Star and tour other newspapers in 
California. A Rotarian since 1938, he 
is a former member of the Rotar) Club 
of Fremont. Nebraska, and is now a 
member and past president of the 
Rotar) Club of Merced. 

Lesher is a member and past chair- 
man of the California State Mental 
Health Board, a director of the Cali- 
fornia Safety Traffic Council, and a 
member of the Merced City Planning 
Commission. In Merced he has been 
president of the Chamber of Commerce 
and the Executives club and vice-chair- 
man of the Count) Housing Authority. 
For many years he was a director and 
legislative representative of the Cali- 
fornia Newspaper Publishers Associa- 
tion. 

W ilhelm is senior member of the law 
firm of Wilhelm and Lewis in King- 
wood. A member of the Rotar) Club 
of Kingwood since 1938, he is past 
President of that club. He is Vice- 
President of the Preston County Bar 
Association and a trustee of the King- 
wood American legion post. An or- 
dained priest of the Episcopal Church, 
he is pnest-in-charge of St. Michael's 
Church, Kingwood. He has served as 
mayor ol Kingwood and as circuit 
judge ol the ISth West Virginia judicial 
circuit. He was in the U.S. Army 
during World Wars I and II and at- 
tained the r.mk ol major. 

Lesci ki Moves Up 

John M I escure, Jr., '54. has been 
appointed \ssist.mt Wholesale Manager 
ol the Philadelphia branch of Sealtest 
Foods Division ol National Dairy 
Products. 

Lescure received his degree with a 



major m Dairying and has been plant 
personnel manager ol the central area 
in Philadelphia lor (he past tour years. 
He and the famil) live at 51 Kosedale 

\venue, Stratford, Pennsylvania. 



I)K. J \( K Sill K \l)l)KI SSES 
I I I .1) Pkix t ssoks 

Agricultural alumni took a prominent 
part in the annual Food Processors' 
Workshop held at th.- University ol 
Maryland. I he workshop, held in Mc- 
Kcldin Library, was attended by 155 
people representing fiX firms lrom all 
parts ot Maryland and other states. 




Dr. Sticr 



Alumni in attendance included 
Charles B. Adams. Jr.. '50. Defenders 
Packing Co.. Trappe: H. R. Betson. '49, 
Jenkins Bros.. Frederick: J. M. Dil- 
worth. '50, Shoreland Freezers. Salis- 
bury: Nazmy Elehwany. '55, Centre 
Count) Canning Corp.. Oak Hall Sta- 
tion. Pa.: Morton Fox. '53. Fox Can- 
ning Co., Queen Anne: W. D. l.eather- 
bury. '49. Pastern Shore Canning Co., 
Machipongo. \ a.: C. Archie Rosen- 
krans. '42. Saulsbury Bros. Ridgely: 
William H. Schoolfield, '48, W. L. 
Wheatly, Inc.. Clayton. Delaware, and 
Charles B. Siher. II. '49. Charles B. 
Siher and Sons. Inc.. Ha\re de Grace. 

The program included the following 
alumni and Universit) personnel: Dr. 
Howard L. Stier. '32. Director. Divi- 
sion ot Statistics. National C aimers As- 
sociation. Washington, D. C: Dr. 



Ciordon Cairns, Dean of Agricultu , 
Harry A. Cox. Canning Technology 
National C anners Association. W ^ 
ington. D. C; Dr. Amihud Kram. 
'38, Department of Horticulture: Ij 
E. P. Walls. 03. retired: and Dr. R. 
Wiley, '49. and B. A. Twigg. 1 
Department of Horticulture. 



Ki i ler Farm Aim 
Harold Keller. '53. has been named / 
sistant Farm Director of the W'ashir 
ton Senators Baseball Club. For ot 
trained in agriculture this is a differt. 
type of farm system. 

Hal combined professional baseb 
and training in Agricultural Econom , 
by playing baseball in the spring a 
summer and attending College in t; 
fall. 

Hal broke into professional baseb 
as a catcher and played in the mini, 
at Memphis. Chattanooga. Auguj , 
Toronto and Hagerstown. He was w i 
the Senators for part of the seasons 
1949. 1950 and 1952. 

Keller decided to devote his time > 
teaching in his home town of Fr. • 
erick, but each summer found him i 
the diamond. For the past sevel 
years he has managed Washingto; 
farm team at Superior in the Nebrasi 
Rookie League, where he also sen! 
as business manager. 

In his new spot he will relieve Sher 
Robertson. Farm Director, in sup- 
vising 29 scouts and as a field man. 



Top Service Award to Alexand; 
Lyle T. Alexander. Chief of the SI 
Survey Laboratories. Soil Conser\atr 
Service. Department of Agriculture, h 
been chosen by the National C'l 
Service League as one of the top u 
career men in the Federal Governrm; 
for 1959. The League, a non-parti>i 
organization of citizens for better go 
ernment through better personnel. ;■ 
nually presents the most highly pri?i 
awards given to public employees byi 
citizen organization. 

Dr. Alexander was selected to 
ceive one of the League's Fifth Anml 
Career Service Awards because of » 
competence, efficiency, character, a I 
continuity of service. 

Dr. Alexander began his gove* 
ment career in 1928 as a junior si 
physicist in the Bureau of Chemis 
and Soils. Studying evenings and wc<- 
ends, he obtained a Ph.D. at the Uj 
versity of Maryland, and steadily ;- 
vanced to become head of the SI 
Survey Laboratories. Today Dr. Al<- 
ander is a world leader in soil scier-' 



20 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZU 






and has made outstanding contributions 
n the fields oi soil management, soil 
jenesis, claj minerals, and radioactive 
naterials. He is an expert on the use 
>i radioactive materials 111 agricultural 
esearcb and on the effects of radio 
ictive fallout on soils. 

Dr. Alexander is a member and 
eader in main scientific societies in- 
:luding Sigma Xi, the American Chem- 
c&] Society, the Soil Science Society oi 
America. I he American Society of 
Agronomy, and the International 
Societj of Soil Science. 

Horn in Athens. I exas, he was edu- 
cated at the University of Maryland. 
He is married and has tour children. 
He lives in Hyattsville, Maryland. 



In his new assignment lie will he in- 
volved in pest control projects as well 

as extension service matters, Mr, Dent 

reports that Australia is a very inter- 
esting country where there are main 

opportunities foi young men. 



Hi- ad Bull 

Fred Downey. '35, a Washington 
Count} dairyman of Williamsport, was 

elected President of the Maryland 
Dairy Herd Improvement Corporation. 
He replaces Phillip Thompson, '34, of 
Ellicott City, a dairyman and news- 
paper man. George C. Paffenberger, 
'50, of Germantown was elected Vice 
President. 



application (1948). He holds patents 
on devices used to spraj 

Mr. Pods has returned to his home- 
town ol ( i aw lord. Mississippi, where 
he has entered into private business. 

DR. POPPl NSIEK III \l> \ I I 

Dr. Cieorge C. Poppensiek has been 
named Dean ol the New York State 
Veterinary College at Cornell Univer- 
sity. Dr. Poppensiek served the Uni- 
versity of Maryland as Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Veterinary Science and then 
served as Department Head with the 
Lederle Laboratories before moving to 
the Cornell Veterinary College as Pro- 
fessor of Bacteriology and Director of 
the Diagnostic Laboratory. 



Wiley a Missionary 

Joseph H. Wiley, '49, was commis- 
sioned a Lutheran missionary in his 
home church at Reisterstown. Church 
ifficials from New York and Baltimore 
conducted the impressive service. Joe 
w as home on leave after spending over 
two years at missions in Liberia, Africa. 
■' here he supervised the construction of 
church school buildings. He has re- 

. turned to Liberia to continue his work 
in helping the Liberians to improve 

i »their living conditions. 



Training Indian Students 

Dr. Bankey S. Lall (M.S. '51 and Ph.D. 
54) is Head of the Department of 
Entomology and State Entomologist, 
Bihar Agricultural College, Sabour, 
India. He states that he has 17 stu- 
dents working toward advance degrees. 



Private Business 

C. B. Melton. Jr., '51 and James A. 
\oppenberger. '55, have established a 
new company, MELCO Laboratories. 
Inc., 3020 Boston Street, Baltimore. 
They are professional pest control 
operators. 



Entomologist in Australia 

Russell G. Dent, Entomology '56, was 
recently appointed State Entomologist 
tor the State of South Australia oper- 
ating out of Adelaide, Australia. Prior 
ito his departure from the United States 
jhe was associated with the U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture in Madison, 
^Wisconsin, where he was engaged in 
[dairy industry research. 

MAY-JUNE. 1959 




Mr. Potts 



Distinguished Federal Servant 
Retires 

S. F. Potts, '24, retired last year from 
the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
after 32 years service. His career in 
government service had been outstand- 
ing. 

Mr. Potts is the author of over 70 
basic research publications in phases of 
entomology, plant pathology, physi- 
ology, chemistry, and engineering. 

He is the recipient of the merit 
award of the Connecticut Tree Pro- 
tective Association ( 1950) as the per- 
son who has done the most for con- 
servation and tree protection. In 1953, 
he was awarded the Nash National 
Conservation Certificate of Merit. He 
received the U.S.D.A. merit award for 
developing the concentrated spray 
method of ground and aerial spray 



Dreessen Gets Wings 

Ensign Frances M. Dreessen, '57, re- 
ceived his "Wings of Gold" of a Naval 
Aviator after completion of advanced 
flight training at Pensacola, Florida. 
The wings were pinned on by his wife, 
the former Miss Helen L. St. John of 
Penlyn, Pennsylvania. 

Blackwell Horticulture 
Editor 

Cecil Blackwell, M.S. '55, has joined 
The Progressive Farmer Magazine staff 
as the horticultural editor. 

Mr. Blackwell started on his home 
farm in Mississippi where they pro- 
duced vegetables. After graduating 
from Mississippi State he did research 
work at their field station before ac- 
cepting a teaching assignment at the 
University of Arkansas. At Maryland 
he majored in horticulture and received 
the Master of Science Degree. 

Foster on Scientific Manpower 
Commission 

Dr. John E. Foster, Head of the 
Animal Husbandry Department was 
elected Secretary-Treasurer of the 
Scientific Manpower Commission. 

The Scientific Manpower Commis- 
sion is concerned with manpower 
policies relating to scientists and mathe- 
maticians; its primary function is close 
liaison with all branches of the Govern- 
ment on matters relating to securing 
scientific manpower. 

Advance Degree 

Joseph D. Harrington, '53, has received 
the master of science degree from 
Pennsylvania State University with a 
major in Agronomy. 

21 



Department of 

\ I R SCIENCE 


















\ 




^ 






faT-I 




J 










jt"* ^^H 




jK 


m^' 




^^i 



( ,-/ Pearsall 

Chid FOR Meritorioi s Simui 

Arms I i ( ol. Ravmond D. Pearsall, 
Military Science '53, was recentlv 
awarded his Second Oak I. cat Cluster 
to (he C ommendation Ribbon in 
Munich, Germany. I he Second Oak 
Leaf Cluster signifies the third presenta- 
tion of the ribbon. He was cited for 
meritorious service as chief comptroller 
tor Headquarters. Southern Area Com- 
mand in Munich. Germany. 

Disi in(,i [shed Graduate Selec i i d 
to Attend Col km 

Captain William A. Warner. Assistant 
Professor of Air Science at Newark 
( ollege ot Engineering, Newark, New 
Jerse\. has been selected to attend the 
U.S. Air Force Squadron Office 
Course at Maxwell Air Force Base. 
Alabama, this summer. Capt. Warner 
holds a jet pilot's qualification and has 
over seven vears of service with the 
I nited States Air Force. He was com- 
missioned via Air Force ROTC as a 
Distinguished AFROIC Graduate, 
I aiversit) of Maryland, 1952. 

I he Squadron Officer Course is de- 
signed to orientate selected Air Force 
officers in all phases ol squadron com- 
mand I unction as well as personnel and 
management procedures. 

Commissioned second lieutenants 
during the University's semi-annual 
Commissioning Ceremony February is 
were six I niversity of Maryland cadets 

and one cadet from Howard Univer- 
sity. ( andidates who took the oath oi 
office ,\n<.\ received their commissions 
are February graduates; thev included 



John I) ( ooper. ( arter ( Hubbel. Jr., 
I homas \l Noppenberger, Rodne> V. 
( o\. Jr.. John Cj Widcncr. and Philip 
I Melvin. Donald S Pierce was the 
candidate from Howard. Col. Robert 
1 Kendig \\^.\n\ ot the Department of 
An Science, administered the oath of 
office and presented the commissions. 
Philip Melvin was designated •'Distin- 
guished AFROTC Graduate". Dr. 
rhomai H Symons, a member of the 
Hoard ol Regents, presented the award 
u> I t. Melvin. 

I he ceremony included an address 
bv Dr. Icon P. Smith. Dean ot the 
(ollege of Arts and Sciences and the 
commissioning address delivered by Dr. 
R. Lee Hornbake. Dean of the Faculty. 
Dr. Hornbake also presented the 
insignia of rank to the candidates. 



College of 
ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Staff of the College 



Department Notes-Microbiology 

Dr. P. Arne Hansen. Professor of 
Microbiology, will present a paper en- 
titled "Factors influencing the antigenic 
composition of Streptococcus bovis," 
by P. A. Hansen and M. J. Carlson, on 
May 1 lth at the annual meeting of the 
Society of American Bacteriologists in 
St. Louis, Missouri. 

An investigation of the biological 
processes which may occur in microbial 
associations when two or more or- 
ganisms are grown in the same environ- 
ment will be undertaken at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. Under the direction 
of Dr. Michael J. Pelczar. Jr.. Profes- 
sor of Microbiology, the project will be 
supported by a S3 1 .660 grant from the 
I S. Office of Naval Research. Accord- 
ing to Dr. Pelczar. the study of a 
single organism, or pure culture, in the 
laboratory has produced a great 
amount of information on the physio- 
logical capabilities and characteristics 
of microorganisms. He said, however, 
that the natural behavior of micro- 
organisms in nature cannot be simu- 
lated in the laboratory by conventional 
pure culture methods. "For example." 
he continued, "studies have indicated 
that certain types o( infection are only 
possible when combinations of organ- 
isms are present simultaneously 



Neither organism in pure culture , 
capable of producing this conditio^ 
Dr. Pelczar explained. "In our partii^ 
lar research project, we hope to obta 
information on the growth. survH 
and biochemical capacities ol varicj 
organisms through their associatii 
which would not be predictable 
studying the organism individually ."" 
concluded. 

Dr. Pelczar holds B.S. and M.S. c- 
grees from the University of Marylar, 
and a Ph.D. degree from the Sti: 
Universitv of Iowa. He has been 
member of the University of Mania 
tacultv since 1946. He is Chairman 
the Committee on Bacteriologic 
Technique of the Societv of Americ 
Bacteriologists, and secretary of a su 
committee of the International Asso« 
ation of Microbiologists. Dr. Pelcz 
has served as President of the Mar 
land chapter of Sigma Xi. a nation 
scientific honorary society, and is ti 
author of many publications includii 
Microbiology, an introductory textbo^ 
in the field. 



University of Maryland 
Professors Address 
International Symposium i 
Romi 



I 



Professors A. Weinstein. H. Wein 
ger of the Institute for Fluid Dynami 
and Applied Mathematics and Profe 
sor A. Douglis of the Department t 
Mathematics, delivered invited a< 
dresses at a Conference on Partial Di 
ferential Equations held Januar 
at the International Computatic 
Center in Rome. Professor Weinste 
presided over one of the sections. 

The Conference was held under tr 
auspices of the United Nations Educ: 
tional Scientific and Cultural Organiz 
tion. and travel to the Conference ft 
the University of Mankind Professoi 
was supported by the Office of Sciei 
tific Research of the Air Fore.- and th 
National Science Foundation. 

Following the Conference Professc 
L. E. Payne, also from the Lniversit 
of Maryland, delivered two lecturt 
upon invitation by the Universitv t 
Rome. 



Joseph Crockett Named Boi inc 
Represfntativ i i\ Washington 

Joseph M. Crockett. "43. of Hager> 
town, has been appointed public rela 
tions representative of Boeing Airplan 
Company in Washington. D.C.. accord 
mg to Harold Mansfield. Boeing direc 
tor of public relations. Crockett come 



22 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINI 



iii Boeing from a position as Manage] 
oi Advertising and Public Relations ol 
Fairchild Aircraft Division, at Hagers- 

lOVi n 

Spiu ii Departmeni Workshop 

I he University's Department of Speech 

and Dramatic Art will sponsor a tele- 
vision workshop tor summer school 
Students June 22 to July 3 1 . 

Primarily designed tor teachers, the 
three-credit course will provide students 
with an opportunity to learn basic pro- 
duction tor all types of television pro- 
gramming. 

Individual projects associated with 
the specific needs of the student will be 
encouraged. The design and produc- 
tion of" entire courses of study, utilizing 
TV. will be investigated in the light of 
contemporary theories of learning and 
educational methods. 




Gen. Caldara, right 

Gen. Caldara Receives Award 

The Benjamin Franklin Award, given 
annually in San Bernardino during Na- 
tional Printing Week, has been pre- 
sented to Maj. Gen. Joseph D. Caldara, 
'31. Gen. Caldara is Director of Flight 
Safety Research for the U. S. Air 
Force. 

The award was made by the Printing 
Industries Association to the person 
who most typifies the character of Ben- 
jamin Franklin, patron saint of print- 
ing. Previous recipients have been the 
Hon. Raymond Blattenberger, Dr. 
Frank C. Baxter, Dr. Arnold O. Beck- 
man, and Art Linkletter. 

Gen. Caldara's dynamic efforts in be- 
half of aircraft accident prevention 
have won international acclaim. In ad- 
dition to distributing hundreds of flight 
safety bulletins yearly to Air Force 
commands all over the world, the gen- 

MAY-JUNE. 1959 



eral's stall at Norton Ait I orce Base, 
San Bernardino, California, also is re- 
sponsible tor the monthly publication 
of two of the most widely read military 
magazines published, / lying Safety and 
Aircraft Accident and Maintenance 
Review. 

I he plaque presented to Gen. 
Caldara paid tribute to him as the per- 
son "who best exemplified the diversity 
of accomplishments and service to his 
country tor which Benjamin Franklin 
is honored." 



Dr. Lejins Elected a Fellow 

Dr. Peter P. Lejins, Professor of Soci- 
ology, has been elected a fellow of the 
American Association for Social Psy- 
chiatry. The Association conferred the 
honor upon the Maryland sociologist 
"in recognition of outstanding service 
to the field." Dr. Lejins has been a 
member of the faculty since 1941. 



Department of Art News 

A great deal of interest is being shown 
in the one-man exhibit of paintings by 
Herman Maril, of the Department of 
Art, which opened at the Babcock 
Galleries in New York City on March 
9th. The exhibit will continue through 
March 28th. Some twenty-four large 
oils, completed during the past three 
years, will be shown in the exhibition. 

Mr. Maril's work is in many private 
collections both public and private, in 
this country and abroad. His work has 
been shown at the Museum of Modern 
Art, Whitney Museum, Carnegie Insti- 
tute. Metropolitan Museum, and others 
throughout the country. He has won 
many awards. The latest, just an- 
nounced, is an award at the Fifth 
Annual Exhibition of the National 
Society Painters in Casein at the River- 
side Museum in New York City. One 
of his works is currently on view at the 
Corcoran Biennial Exhibition in Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

"The Dunes", an oil painting by Her- 
man Maril, was purchased by the 
Corcoran Gallery, Washington, D. C. 
The painting was selected from the 
13th Annual Exhibition. The acquisi- 
tion of this work is the second painting 
by Mr. Maril this Gallery has acquired. 

After an intensive three month 
search by State and Campus police, 
three students at the University were 
discovered to be the vandals who had 
stolen and then destroyed an oil paint- 
ing by Professor James P. Wharton, 
Head of the Department of Art. All 
three boys were suspended on January 



21 by a faculty disciplinary committee 

Several \c.ns agO a small sketch of the 
same painting was taken from a loekei 

m the \it Department. 

An experiment in teaching a large 
class with closed circuit television was 
Conducted by the Department of Art 
on Wednesday, February llth. The 
students, seated in the Central Audi- 
torium, viewed lor an hour and a half 
an illustrated art lecture given by Dr. 
John Lembach from the studio in the 
basement of the Skinner Building. I his 
was the first time that such a large- 
scale experiment was attempted on the 
campus, and the participants were well 
pleased with the results. 

On March 6th, Assistant Professor 
Francis Grubar was a member of a 
panel discussing problems in religious 
art, held in the National Housing Audi- 
torium, Washington, D.C, under the 
auspices of The Catholic Round Table. 
Others in the panel included Professors 
Leite of George Washington, Giam- 
pietro of Catholic University, and Rev. 
Sloyan, also of Catholic University. 

Col. James P. Wharton, Head of the 
Art Department, was represented with 
four paintings in a recent exhibition at 
Muth's, Washington, D.C, in which 
representative examples of work by 
the various art department heads in this 
area were on display. 

Ralph Freeny, a graduate assistant 
in the Department of Art, had a 
one-man show of paintings in the Stu- 
dent Union Building from March 20 to 
April 5. 

Arthur Brigham Takes 
New Post 

Arthur P. Brigham, '50, former editor 
of the Bethesda Tribune took over as 
Public Information Officer for the 
Washington Suburban Sanitary Commis- 
sion on May 1. Mr. Brigham had been 
with the Tribune about a year. In his 
new post he is replacing J. B. Zatman. 

Previously he has worked as apart- 
ment manager for Georgia Avenue 
Properties. Inc. of Silver Spring. Mr. 
Brigham is married and has two sons. 
Mr. Brigham is the brother of Dave 
Brigham. Alumni Secretary. 



Dr. Hilton Speaks 

Andrew C Hilton, '53, was recently 
guest speaker at a meeting of the 
Boston Chapter of PGEM. The meet- 
ing, the first of three in a series, was 
held to discuss aspects of special 
screening techniques in local industrial 
organizations. 

(Continued on next page) 

23 




Mr. Madi iroi 



Mad i ikos Appointed 

Eugene M.. Madeiras, '52. has recently 
been appointed Professional Service 
Representative in the Jersey shore terri- 
tory of CI HA Pharmaceutical Products 
Inc. 

Si i ion Rl PRIM Ms UNIVERSITY 

The university of Maryland was offi- 
cially represented at the inauguration of 
Dr. Charles Odegaard as President of 
the University of Washington by 
Marion Sutton. '35. Mr. Sutton works 



as an officei ul the National Hank or 
Commerce, Empire Way, Washington. 

I wo Join Si m i 

Lawrence vt Fagg, Ms '47, and 
James V Duffy, v ' s 57, have re- 

cently joined the technical stall ol 
Atlantic Research ( orporalion. Alex- 
andria. Virginia. Mr Jagg assumes 
duties in the Kinetics and Combustion 
Division and Mr Duff) in the Pioneer- 
ing Research Group. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 



Solar and Atomic ENERGY 
Research Report 

A University of Maryland research 
study, published recently, proposes that 
the United States initiate an interna- 
tionally financed program for the devel- 
opment and application of solar energy . 
Under the title "Solar and Atomic 
Energy: A Survey." the Bureau of 
Business and Economic Research re- 



port suggests that as a substitute fo. 
nuclear fission "there is an alternate 
source of energy waiting to be deve 
oped, and an international communit 
interested in its application to th 
welfare ot mankind. 

I his is solar energy — inexhaustihU 
powerful, sater in control, and promis 
ing of great economy in operation . . . 

According to the research evalua 
lions solar energy which can be cap 
tured and used can eventually take th 
place of depleted supplies of the world' 
coal, petroleum and gas. In addition 
solar energy would be more ad\an 
tageous than nuclear fission in that i 
would not require special minerals am 
the necessity for elaborate sateguard 
against exposure. 

While nuclear fission in the A-boml 
and nuclear fusion in the H-bomb an 
facts, extensive peace-time applicatioi 
of nuclear energy remains in the future 
Costs remain unknown for fission. an> 
experiments in fusion have not ye 
yielded practical results. 

Some of the economic consideration' 
are outlined as follows: "A tremendou 
investment from public and pri\at< 
sources continues to be made in ex 
mental processes and operational plant 
equipment, and material. Since scien 
tific and engineering problems still re 
main before smooth production o: 
tions are possible, cost estimates remair 
impractical. Perhaps recently con- 
structed and newly inaugurated plant* 



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24 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



may ultimate!) yield dependable data, 
mi heretofore atomic powei has been 
b produced largely as a bj product ol 
•' the operation o! research reactors." 
Costs depend upon varied assumptions 
used b) public and private agencies. 

I nder the title "Contamination ol 

Humans and Environment," the stud) 
sketches the dangers ol fallout from 
itomic blasts, radiation from nuclear 

•ducts and wastes and from over- 
exposures in industrial and medical 
["here is great danger in the dis- 
>osal ol radioactive waste particles in 
he ocean or underground if seepage 
tccurs. Moreover, as determined by 
he Nobel Prize winner. Dr. Herman J. 
\luller. radiation effects are transmitted 
descendants still unborn. Various 
preventives and cures are summarized 
n the text. 

1 he general problem of atmospheric 
dilution is presented, including not 
>nlj radioactive materials from nuclear 
ission but contamination from daily 
luman activities, as well, represented in 
ndustrial, municipal, household, trans- 
portation, and personal sources. Pro- 
posals for control of these lethal gases 
ind particles are offered. 



Newsom at Northwestern 

Dr. Earl Newsom, Associate Professor 
)f Journalism, recently took part in 
Northwestern University's first annual 
hort course for newsmen in crime news 
inalysis and reporting. Representatives 
ncluded 72 newsmen from 21 states 
ind three foreign countries, a 34-man 
ecture staff of specialists in criminology 
ind crime news reporting presented 
alks and panel discussions designed to 
mprove the newsmen's understanding 
)f the crime problem. 

College, Dean Pyle, Praised 

Vt a meeting of area accountants 
darch 13 the problems of a significant 
Irop in enrollments for accounting 
najors was discussed. Present at the 
neeting were Dr. Nathan Baily of 
\merican University; Dr. Martin Black 
)f Duke University; Clark L. Simpson, 
Thairman of the meeting. President of 
he Federal Government Accountants 
Association: Victor Turyn, a 1949 
xaduate of the University in ac- 
ounting; Dr. Ralph Kennedy of 
jeorge Washington University; Profes- 
or Henry Cunningham of Georgetown 
Jniversity; Robert Findley of the U.S. 
Tivil Service; Fred McLaughlin of the 
-lousing Administration; and Professor 
Charles T. Sweeney of the University 
if Maryland. 

■(AY-JUNE. 1959 



President Simpson paid tribute to the 
1 ollege ol Business and Public Admin- 
istration. As related in the Free State 
News of March 1 1 >. Mr. Simpson 

stated "Maryland's Accounting and 
Economics stall is outstanding and their 
courses equal to those offered any- 
where. This can be attributed to the 
high ideals and objectives of their guid- 
ing force, Dean Pyle. who although 
unable to attend this meeting, sent his 
able representative Charles Sweeney." 

Sugure Elected 

Bernard A. Sugure, '34, was elected to 
the Board of Directors of the Citizens 
Bank of Takoma Park and Langley 
Park at the annual meeting of the 
stockholders. Mr. Sugure is President 
of Norman Ford Co., College Park, 
and the Norman Insurance Agency. 



Kk 1 APPOIN ill) Si l'l kvisok 
Roberl C. Rice, '41, has been appointed 

supervisor at the Jacksonville, Florida 

general agency of the Aetna Life In- 
surance Company. Mr. Rice was as- 
sociated with the insurance company in 
Baltimore and Hagerstown from 1950 
to 1954 and recently has been at 
Romney, West Virginia. 

McKee to Cleveland 

John P. McKee, '56, has been named 
Cleveland, Ohio, Home Office Repre- 
sentative of Pacific Mutual Life In- 
surance Company's Group Insurance 
Department. McKee joined Pacific 
Mutual in January, 1958, and had pre- 
viously been assigned to the company's 
Washington, D. C. group insurance 
operation. 

(Continued on next page) 




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ENGIN EERS 

P HYSICIST S 
MATHEMATICIANS 

Douglas diversification affords 
broadened opportunities, com- 
bined with stability and se- 
curity. 

'• Engineering at Douglas is 
divided into three basic areas 
. . . missile and space systems, 
transport aircraft and combat 
aircraft. In these military and 
commercial categories, each 
advancing beyond present fron- 
tiers of achievement, engineers 
and scientists can progress to 
the limit of their capabilities. 

In addition, supervisory and 
executive openings are filled 
from within the company. 
Many of the top executive 
officers at Douglas are engi- 
neers who have moved right up 
to assume wide responsibility. 

We are interested in engi- 
neers with backgrounds in 
other fields as well as avionics, 
aircraft and missiles. 

For further information write 
to Mr. C. C. LaVene, Douglas 
Aircraft Company, Inc., Santa 
Monica, California. 
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Mr. Bourke 

Appointed Vice President 

John J. Bourke, *35. has been appoint- 
ed Viee President in Charge of 
Sales of the Metropolitan Wire Goods 
Corporation, Wilkes-Barre. Penns\l- 
\ania. He will supervise sales, advertis- 
ing, promotion, publicity and public 
relations. He previously served as Sales 
Manager. 

Mr. Bourke is a member of the 
Board of Directors of the Lewis Hotel 
Training School in Washington. D. C. 
He attended the Lewis School after 
graduating from the University of 
Maryland. 

While at the University. Mr. Bourke 
was elected to membership in Omicron 
Delta Kappa, national honorary leader- 
ship fraternity. At present, he is Chair- 
man of the Membership Committee of 
the National Association of Food 
Equipment Manufacturers. 



School of 

DENTISTRY 



Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S. 



Senator Clark Honored 

I he D. C . Dental Society began its 

27th annual postgraduate clinic at the 
Shoreham Hotel on March 15. In its 
kickoff session, the International Col- 
lege ol Dentists. Washington Section. 
beard reports related to the city's use of 
fluoridated water. 

As a highlight oi the first day's meet- 
ing. Senator Joseph S. Clark ol Penn- 
sylvania was made an honorar\ fellow 




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26 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINt 



ol the liiioiiKitioii.il ( ollege. 1 ho honor 

cane to Senator Clark in recognition ot 
his support ot water fluoridation while 
be was mayor ot Philadelphia. 1 ho 
presentation of the certificate and s\m- 
bol ot membership was made bj Dr. 
( reorge B. Clendenin, '2V. 

Dr. Paqi in Receives \\\ vrd 

Dr. Norman O. Paquin. '46. a I all 
River, Massachusetts, dentist, recently 
u.i> the recipient of the "Outstanding 

Young Man" award of tho Junior 
Chamber of Commerce of that city. 

I ho award was presented by JCC Presi- 
dent Thomas F. Burke. 

A practicing dentist in Fall River tor 

II \ears. Dr. Paquin is Past President 
of the Southeastern District of the Mas- 
sachusetts Dental Society, the Fall 
Ri\er Dental Society and the Fall Rivet- 
Junior Chamber of Commerce. He 

; is on the Board of Directors of the 
Kiwanis Club: on the executive board 
of the Fall River Country Club and a 
Director of the Fall River Chapter of 
the Rod Cross. 

Dr. Paquin is married and the father 
of two boys. 

The "Alma Mater" 

This past March the Alumni Associa- 
tion of the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery. Dental School, University of 
Maryland, published their first edition 
oi the "Alma Mater". The event is 
significant for we now have an official 
and direct means of communication 
v\ ith more than 4,000 alumni practicing 
in twenty-six countries. The members 
of our Association have long known of 
the need for such a publication and 
now. thanks to the support of the offi- 
cers and councilmen of our organiza- 
tion, combined efforts are bearing fruit. 
The cover is artistically designed and 
bears the seal of our organization in 
color, likewise a picture of a bas-relief 
of Dr. Chapin A. Harris and Dr. 

: Horace H. Hayden, who in 1840 
founded the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, the oldest dental 
School in the world. With this fact in 
mind, it seemed particularly appropri- 

; ate that the title. "Alma Mater", was 
selected. The printing is bold, dull 
black on a glossy, heavy white back- 
ground. The diversified contents in- 
clude — Editorial comment. President's 
message. Secretary's report. Historian's 
report. Letters. Alumni activities, Dallas 
meeting. Honored Alumni, School 
affairs. Personals, Obituaries, An- 
nouncements, Officers and Committees. 
An indication of the far-reaching in- 
(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE. 1959 



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fluencc ol oui Alumni is best illustrated 
by listing .1 tew ol the states in which 
important activities took place Mary- 
land, North Carolina, Weal Virginia, 
Ncu lersey, Rhode Island, (exas, 

I OUisiana, and Massachusetts Ol par- 

ticulai lignificance to all Alumni ol the 

(neater Iniversiiv ol Maryland, is all 

excerpt from an address on, l4 Oui 
Heritage", bj Ferdinand J s Gorgas, 
\i I) i) I) s . published in the Memo- 
rial Volume ol the ( entennial Celebra- 
tion, University ol Maryland, iy()7. 
Likewise, a notice ol the first Alumni 
meeting ol the Baltimore ( ollege ol 
Dental Surgery, March 6, \si(i. as 
recorded in the Dental Cosmos, 1876, 
\ ol 1 8, has historical interest 

I'ei haps one of the greatest values 

Ol the Alma Mater" is [hat it shall 

serve as a repository ol events provid- 
ing those who succeed us with a more 

accurate account of our progress. 

RHODI 1st WD At I MM Si ( ll()\ 
Mm is 

I he Rhode Island Alumni Section held 
its annual meeting on Monday, January 
19, at the Biltmore Hotel in Provi- 
dence, K. I. in conjunction with the 
Rhode bland State Dental Convention. 
I his meeting was one of the largest 
gatherings ol Rhode Island Alumni of 
the Dental School. University ol Marx- 
land. 

I here was a cocktail partv. banquet 



and business meeting. During the 
evening ceremonies. Distinguished 
Alumni Awards were presented to Dr. 
I i nest NuttaJJ and Di Rule W. Preis. 
1 his Award was the first of its kind in 
the New l ngland area. 

It is rather interesting to note that 
the smallest state in the Union repre- 
sents approximately loo graduates ol 
the Dental School. University of Mary- 
land. At its first organizational meeting 
held last year, forty-seven graduates 

attended. I his was a remarkable at- 
tendance for an alumni section. A great 
deal of this success is due to the leader- 
ship ol Dr. Edward C. Morin, Presi- 
dent, and Dr. William F. Decesare. 
Secretary in that area. I he\ should be 
congratulated tor their loyalty and 
devotion to the Dental School. 

Rhode Island dentistrv has been 
blessed with men such as Dr. Michael 

B. Messore, Dr. Edgar L. Bessette. Dr. 
James H. Kershaw. Dr. Charles 
Heaton, Dr. Peter I . Kanelos and Dr. 
I ric Waxberg, who have been leaders 
of the dental profession. 

Many of the younger men such as 
Dr. Eugene M. Nelson. Dr. Frank V. 
I irrochi. Dr. George Weir. Dr. Carlo 

C. Calenda, Dr. Frank S. Celestino, 
Dr. Pasquale Capalbo, Dr. Albert D. 
Picozzi and many others have contrib- 
uted their parts in this effort. 

The officers and council of the 
Alumni Association of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery. Dental 



School. University of Maryland, con 
gratulates this Section and are proud o 
the record made by its graduates n 
little "Rhodv". 

Officers of the Rhode Island Alumn 
Section for 1959 include: Dr. Edwari 
( Morin. President: Dr. Eric Waxberg 
1st Vice-President: Dr. Edward A 
Lynaugh, 2nd Vice-President; Dr. Wil 
liam F. Decesare. Secretary : Dr 
Charles E. Heaton. Treasurer: Dr 
Eugene M. Nelson. Historian: Dr. A 
James Kershaw. Editor. 

\\ i si Virginia Honors 
J. Bin Robinson 

On July 22. 1958. at the 52nd annua 
session of the West Virginia D 
Society, an oil portrait of Dr. J 
Robinson was unveiled by J. Ben Funk, 
grandson of Dr. Robinson. Dr I 
Laughlin, President, presented the por- 
trait to Dean Kenneth V. Randolph, 
who accepted it on behalf of the V 
Virginia Dental School. 

Louisiana Honors 
Dean Frank HOUGHTON 

A portrait of Dr. Frank J. Houghton. 
Dean of the School of Dentisu 
Loyola University. New Orleans. 1 
was presented by Dr. Robert F. I 
man. Professor of Operative Dentistry 
and President-Elect of the Univer- 
chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon. 
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THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



(he Ver> Rev. W. Patrick Donnellv, 
s i . Presidenl ol Loyola, who accepted 
the painting on behalf of the Univer- 
sity iik- presentation was made, Octo- 
ber 17. at a chapter meeting in the 
student lounge. 

IU\ I OR 1 [ONORS 

Di w Harry McCarthy 

During the alumni meeting ol the 
Bayloi Dental College at the Adolphus 
Hotel on November 10. Governoi 
Price Daniels and Baylor University 
President Dr. W. R. White, presented 
Dean Harry McCarthy with the follow- 
ing citation inscribed on a beautiful 
plaque: 

Dean Harry B. McCarthy, in 
recognition of his service to the 
Baylor College of Dentistry and to 
the Profession of Dentistry, the 
Alumni of the College join in this 
public record of appreciation." 

This is the first time in the history 
of the school that this award or citation 
has been given. 

Alpha Omega Presents Plaque 

On Friday. February 13. 1959, amid 
the quiet, history-filled surroundings of 
the Dental School Museum, a beautiful 
bronze plaque, commemorating the 
fiftieth anniversary of the founding of 
Alpha Omega Fraternity, was presented 
to the school. 

Fifty-two years ago. in 1907, this 
dental fraternity was founded at the 
school by a handful of far-seeing stu- 
dents. Since that time, the fraternity 
has grown to over 6,000 members with 
chapters all over the United States, 
Canada and Israel. 

The stirring presentation to com- 
memorate this founding was con- 
ducted by Past National President, Dr. 
Jesse Trager. and the tablet was ac- 
cepted by Dean Myron Aisenberg for 
the Dental School. Speakers included 
Dr. Samuel Neistadt, one of the few 
remaining founders, and Dr. David 
Dyen, present National President of 
Alpha Omega. Also in attendance were 
Dr. Walter Levine, National Secretary 
and Dr. Ben Williamowsky, National 
Regent, as well as a large audience of 
AJpha Omegans, faculty members and 
wives. 

At the conclusion of the ceremonies, 
Miss Katherine Toomey entertained 
with delicious refreshments. 

Alumni Breakfast in Washington 

3n Tuesday, March 17, the Alumni 
Association held a most successful 
(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE. 1959 



CONGRATULATIONS — 

&late of 59 

To you, the new alumni of the University of Maryland 
School of Dentistry, we extend our very best wishes for 
a successful career in the practice of your chosen pro- 
fession. 

We cordially invite you to come in and inspect the 
facilities of one of America's largest laboratories. 




o-operative 

Dental Laboratories 

Attlttnt »t Otnltl Protlhtlltt 

12 Welt Madlion Street 
BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



SERVING THE DENTAL PROFESSION 
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EDWARD A. ROMEO, Innkeeper 







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29 



HAVE YOU 
SEEN THE NEW 
SITE FOR SAVERS? 




Generous Quarterly 

Dividends Will Be 

Paid in 1959 

District 7-2370 



Tiiufl 



rstIJI:] 



:deral 

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ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 

610 - 13th Street, N. W. 

Bethesda Branch 
8216 Wisconsin Avenue 



VICTOR 

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Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
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Sales R( prt s< ntatives in 
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breakfast in the Palladia]] Room, 
Sbofeham Hotel, these annual affairs 
arc arranged in conjunction with the 
District ol ( olumbia's Post-Graduate 
( linic meeting. I acb year the attend- 
ance has increased which is a good 
indication oi its popularity. President 
Edwin Gail introduced a number of 
distinguished members and guests: 
among them: Dr. Ernest M. Colvin. Jr.. 
Past President ol the District oi I o- 
lumbia Dental Society; Dr. Melvin H. 
Colvin, General Arrangements Chair- 
man of District oi Columbia Post- 
Graduate < limes; Dr. Bruno G. Horia. 
President ol District ol Columbia So- 
ciety; Genera] Robert H. Mills. First 
Major-General of the United States 
Army Dental Corps. Dr. James H. 
Ferguson, Jr.. Past President. American 
College of Dentists: Dr. Edward White. 
I rustee of the Fourth District — Ameri- 
can Dental Society; Dr. George 
Clendenin, President-Elect, Maryland 
State Dental Association; Dr. George 
Anderson. First Recipient of the Dis- 
tinguished Alumni Award: Dr. Daniel 
E. Lynch, Past President of American 
Dental Society. Dr. M\ron Aisenberg. 
Dean. Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School of University 
of Maryland: Dr. Katherine Toomey. 
Administrative Assistant. Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery. Dental 
School. University of Maryland. 

The Association thanks Dr. Ben Wil- 
liamowsky and his local committee for 
their excellent cooperation with our 
secretary, Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio. 
About 100 members registered and 
quite a few others arrived late, but 
stayed for the brief remarks of Dean 
Myron Aisenberg and others. 



College of 

EDUCATION 

Wary \l. Vreeland 



Dr. Pri scott Delimrs 
Horace Mann Lectl rf. 

"Factors that Influence learning" was 
the subject of a lecture presented by 
Dr. Daniel A. Prescott, Director of the 
Institute for Child Study, at the annual 
presentation of the Horace Mann Lec- 
ture of 1958, in May, 1958, in the 
School ol Education at the University 
of Pittsburgh. In cooperation with the 
Tri-State Area School Stud) Council 
and the University ol Pittsburgh, the 



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30 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Horace Mann Lectureship ^.is estab 
lished to commemorate the life ol 
Horace Mann, 1 796 to i s^ 1 '. in re< 
nition ol his matchless services to the 
American Public School System. 

Dr. Grambs \i l HORS Pi o 

Di lean D. Grambs, of the College of 
Education staff, h.ts written a com- 
munity-school dramatization highlight- 
ing the reasons u in we need education 
about education entitled. "Anything 
Familiar?", ["his play has been written 
.is an aid in getting an edueation.il 
program about education started in an) 
community, it can be staged without 
props 01 a professional east. Wherevei 
adults come together the pla) is useful 
.is a device to stimulate an audience to 
want to think and talk about the prob- 
lems of education in their own com- 
munity. 

Songs For Children Written By 
Mrs. Brown 

Mrs. Lillian Brown. Instructor in Child- 
hood Education, has composed several 
piano solos which were published by 
The Wallis Music Company, of Cincin- 
nati. Ohio. The titles are: The Waltz- 
ers, Echoes, The Jester. Dunce of the 
Clowns. Acrobats, and Skating. These 
publications are intended primarily for 
use by private teachers of piano. 

Article ox Art Appears 

Dr. John Lembach. of the Art Depart- 
ment and a cooperating staff member 
of the College of Education, has written 
an article, "Art — an Expanding Front", 
for a special issue published in the pro- 
ceedings of the 16th annual conference 
of April. 1958. of the National Com- 
mittee on Art Education of the New 
York Museum of Modern Art. Dr. 
Lembach was chairman of a panel dur- 
, ing this conference and wrote the 
article as a result of his participation on 
the panel. 

Dr. Lembach was given a printed 
acknowledgement for his editorial as- 
sistance as well as for the use of one of 
his photographic illustrations in a new 
book on Arts and Crafts. 

Mrs. Guy Publishers Second 
Story of this Year 

One of the College of Education former 
students. Mrs. Anne Welsh Guy, who 
received an A. B. Degree in 1950, has 
made her second contribution of the 
current school year to the publication, 
The Instructor, in the March, 1959, 
(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE. 1959 




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At your grocer's no w , or write for 

n r ." c ." i». I name of nearest dealer to: Crosse 

& Blackwell, Baltimore 24, Md. 



Howard W. Jackson 



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H. Riall Jackson 



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INSURANCE — ESTABLISHED 1904 

MUlberry 5-4700 — Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

It is important to know what your insurance policies do not cover. 

DRIVE CAREFULLY — AVOID ACCIDENTS 

Most Fires Result From Permitting Fire Hazards To Exist Or 
Other Forms Of Carelessness 



furniture 
Interior Decorating 

Furnishing and Decorating Maryland 

Homes and Institutions for 

over 64 years 

BENSON 

CHARLES STREET at Franklin 
MU 5-4510 Baltimore, Md 



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PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SArotoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2. MD. 



31 




TASTE THE DIFFERENCE 
QUALITY MAKES! 



ZSSKAV 

Wqualitymt 



ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to whole- 
some, flavorful perfection. Be 
sure to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
Wm. SCHLUDERBERG — T. J. KURDLE CO. 



F. A. Davis & Sons 

WHOLESALERS 

Cigars. Tobaccos, Sundries & Supplies 

Kitchen & Dining Equipment 

Soda Fountain Supplies 

119 S. HOWARD STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



issue Mis Guy's story, "Lazj Boy and 

the Easter Bunnv," was written for 
kindergarten and primary grades. Her 
material has appeared in a number of 
other magazines and she has written 

tour books in the last three years. 



I)k. Haring Chairs Symposii m 

I)i Son is (i Haring, ol the College of 
Education staff, acted as ( hairman of 
a Research Symposium Ol the Ameri- 
can Association on Mental Deficiency, 
at the National Convention in Mil- 
waukee. Wisconsin, on Ma\ 20. 1959. 



Dr. Ulry Attends Profession m 
Meetings 

On February 12. 13. and 14. Dr. Orval 
I I Irs attended the combined meet- 
ings of the Association for Student 
Teachers and the American Association 
of Colleges of Teacher Education. 
These meetings were held in the Con- 
rad Hilton Hotel in Chicago. Illinois. 
While in Chicago. Dr. Ulry spent one 
afternoon visting the College of Edu- 
cation on the campus of Northwestern 
University at nearby Evanston. 

Dr. Ulry spoke to the Association of 
Orthodox Jewish Scientists in Riggs 
Park, Maryland, on Saturday, March 
14. on the topic of. "Introducing a 
Science Program (grades 1-12) into 
the Acaderm ." 

Industrial Education 

Department Host to Campus 

Club 

The Campus Club of the University 
held its March meeting in the J. M. 
Patterson Building where the group was 
hosted by the Industrial Education 
Department. Dr. Paul E. Harrison 
greeted the ladies for the Department 
and described the nature of the work 
done in Industrial Education. Arrange- 
ments for a tour of the various labora- 
tories were in the charge of Carl 
Schramm who was assisted by the 
other faculty members and selected 
students. The group saw several classes 
and witnessed some of the unusual 
activities of the Department. 

Industrial Education Holds 
Open House 

On March 20 and 21. the Industrial 
Education Department held its annual 
open house. Numerous educators and 
industrialists visited the J. M. Patterson 
Building to observe the wide range of 
activities carried on in the Department. 



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(Two Entrances) 



32 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






Special demonstrations and displays 
were set up foi the visitors to observe. 
A highlight of the two-daj affair w.is 
the evening meeting at which Dr. R. 
Lee Hornbake, Dean ol Faculty, spoke 
to a group ol teachers and educators 
from various parts of the state. 




!?*&* 



$ 



*J* 




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Miss Burger 

Miss Burger is 
Apple Blossom Princess 

Ellie Burger, a 21 -year-old Maryland 
senior, represented the University at the 
Shenandoah Valley Apple Blossom Fes- 
tival at Winchester. Virginia, April 29- 
May 1. Miss Burger, who said she was 
"most honored to be chosen to repre- 
sent the University," was a Princess in 
the Court of the Queen of the Festival. 

Ellie is the daughter of two Univer- 
sity of Maryland alumni. Major Gen- 
eral Joseph Burger, Commanding Gen- 
eral of the Second Marine Division at 
Camp Lejeune. North Carolina, is a 
1925 graduate. While at the University, 
General Burger was a member of Scab- 
bard and Blade and served as R.O.T.C. 
Cadet Major. He is a member of 
Kappa Alpha fraternity. 

Mrs. Burger, the former Frances 
Freeny, was graduated with the 1928 
class. A member of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma sorority, she served as Presi- 
dent of the Women's Student Govern- 
ment Association and Mortar Board. 
In her senior year, she was awarded the 
Women's Citizenship Prize. 

Ellie, who is now a member of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority, served 
as Rush Chairman last year. She is 
majoring in Elementary Education. 
(Continued on next page) 

MAY- JUNE, 1959 




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Leather Club Chairs and 

Davenports 

Steel Desks and Filing Cabinets 

THE JAMES T. VERNAY 
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PLaza 2-4220 Baltimore 2, Md. 



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33 



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College of 

ENGINEERING 



A. Bernard Eyler 




Mr. Brudstreet 

Mr. Brads trf ft New 
Sales Manager 
Fred E. Bradstreet. Ch.E.. has been 
appointed Sales Manager of the newly 
formed Isomode Di\ision of the MB 
Manufacturing Company, a di\is:on of 
Textron. Inc. The new Division will be 
responsible for the manufacture, distri- 
bution, and sales of MB's complete line 
of vibration isolating materials and 
products, including Isomode pads and 
mounts, and Iso-level mounts. Mr. 
Bradstreet has been associated with 
MB for 1 1 years. 

Joins Bureau of Public Roads 
Frederick H. Rogers. Jr.. '58, has 
joined the Bureau of Public Roads. 
Design Office oi Vancouver, Washing- 
ton. He is at Fort Ord. California for 
a three-month active training program 
and will work in Oregon and Washing- 
ton State on construction projects until 
November 1959. 

Albert E. Slade, '50, joined the staff 
oi Arthur D. Little, Inc.. in \9>h where 
he is in charge oi cryotron research. 
This field of work is to study the 
feasibility, of constructing highspeed 
superconductive switching circuits. Mr. 
Slade was previously with the National 
Security \gencj where he served as 
Assistant Director oi the Engineering 
Research Division. 

John Beilein. '49. is the new Chief 




on a iwn 



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See 






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7125 Baltimore Avenue 

just South of the Campus 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



HITTS 

ELECTRICAL SERVICE, 

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34 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



I ngineei « ith the Mat j land I ire 
Underwriters Rating Bureau, in Balti- 
more, Maryland. He is also currently 
active in the Societ) ol I ire Protection 
Engineers 

Professoi \ Wile) Sherwood, Head, 
Department ol Aeronautical Engineer- 
ing, served as co-chairman with Profes- 
soi A. E. Cronk ol rexas A & M in 
arranging the sixth annual joint meeting 
i>i the Aeronautical Division of the 
A.S.E.E. and the IAS. held in January 
in \c« ^ ork. 

At Oslo, Norway 
Elgin V\ Scott, Jr.. '39, has been sta- 
tioned in Oslo. Norway for a little more 
than a year as Chief Engineer, Allied 
Air Forces. Northern Europe. He 
writes. "We like it here very much. 
especially the people." 

From 1954 until late l l >57. Col. 
Scott was assigned to the Air Force 
Icadem) Construction Agency in 
Colorado Springs, first as Assistant to 
the Chief. Operations Division and then 
.is Executive Officer. He was recently 
..warded the Air Force Commendation 
Medal for his part in this construction. 

Morris Promoted 

lohn D. Morris. *26. has been ap- 
pointed Regional Manager of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad's Chesapeake 
region. Mr. Morris has had wide and 
varied experience in the railroad's 
operating department. 

Weber Elected President 

' George O. Weber, Director of Physical 
Plant and Supervising Engineer, was 
elected President of the eastern region 
of the National Association of Physical 
Plant Administrators at its annual meet- 
ing in New York City. 

The purposes of the NAPPA are to 
develop common interest, in adminis- 
tration, operation, care, planning and 
development of physical plants used by 
universities and colleges; and to pro- 
mote professional ideals and standards 
among the men engaged in this work. 

Among his duties as President of the 
eastern region, which is made up of all 
institutions of higher learning north of 
Virginia and east of Ohio, Weber will 
plan next year's meeting scheduled to 

I be held in New York in January. 1960. 
Weber, a graduate of the University 
of Maryland in civil engineering, '33, 
has been in his present capacity since 
1946. His experience includes two 
years as an engineer with the U.S. 
Coast and Geodetic Survey, five years 
in his own business as a sales engineer 
in Baltimore, and six years military 
(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE. 1959 



Bank of Bethhsda 



BETHESDA, MARYLAND 
OLiver 4-1000 



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DRIVE-IN BRANCH 
• Four Windows 
1836 CordeU Ave 
Bethesda 14, Md. 



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McLeod 6t Romberg 
Stone Co.. Inc. 



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Bladensburg, Maryland 



Scudine/m oxygen company 

4/® COMPRESSED GAS MANUFACTURER 
ANESTHETIC & INHALATION THERAPY 
GASES and EQUIPMENT 
RESUCITATION EQUIPMENT 

RENTAL and REPAIR SERVICE 

2900 - 52nd Street — Bladensburg, Md. — UNion 4-2345 



ALLIANCE PLUMBING & HEATING COMPANY 

PLUMBING AND HEATING CONTRACTORS 

1360 OKIE ST., N.E. LA 6-3753 

WASHINGTON 2, D. C. 



35 



CJi'eru Uable \Jiertoohi 
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OJney Inn 

"Old Plantation Recipes" 

LUNCHEON - DINNER 
COCKTAILS 

Noon to 9:30 P.M. Daily 
(Closed Mondays) 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR BRIDGE PARTIES 
WEDDINGS. BANQUETS, CLUB MEETINGS 

ON STATE ROUTE 97 
OLNEY, MARYLAND 

— Ample Parking Space — 

PHONE Whitehall 6-5757 

Gertrude Allison Brewster, Owner 



We 

DEVELOP LAND 

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REALTORS 

3718 Rhode Island Avenue 

MT. RAINIER, MD. 
AP. 7-1111 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 





1317 


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Washington, 


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Virginia 






Phone 


and South 






Lincoln 3-8151 


Northwest 






Phone 


and Subur 


KM 




LOckwood 5-3556 



Baltimore MEdford 3-6500 

OFFICES: 

THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, MARYLAND 



dut\ with the U.S. Army during World 
War II. part ol which was spent as an 
infantry battalion commander in Italy 
where he received main decorations. 




I s. \RMY PHOTO 

First Class (Senior) Cadet Hubert T. 
Servis, of Silver Spring, Maryland, is 
shown with Dr. Frederic T. Mavis, Dean 
of the College of Engineering, during the 

tatter's visit to the U. S. Military Academy 
Feb. 16. Dr. Mavis is a member of the 
Middle States Evaluation Committee 
which made a four-day inspection visit to 
West Point. Cadet Servis holds the rank 
of Lieutenant in the Corps of Cadets at 
the Academy. 



Visits Campus 

Edward K. Bebb. "40. visited the Mary- 
land campus on a recruiting call for 
civil engineers for the Bureau of Recla- 
mation. He also visited the local student 
chapter of A.S.C.E. to present a talk 
and films on the new Glen Canyon 
Dam which is now. under construction 
on the Colorado River. 

Mr. Edward J. Ziegler. "46. is the 
newly appointed contact member to 
operate between the Student Chapter of 
A.S.C.E. and the Maryland State Sec- 
tion of the Society. Charles P. Finn. 
'58, and Merritt O. Chance. '51. will 
work with him in this capacity. 

Attends Conferem i 

Professor C. T. G. Looney. Head of 
the Civil Engineering Department, 
presided over one of the Structural 
Division sessions on plastic design at 
the American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers convention in Los Angeles. 

Former Dr w Visits 

The Board of Directors meeting of the 
College of Engineering Chapter of the 




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36 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



University oi Maryland Alumni tasoci 
ation hold February 11. 1959, waa 
pleased to have I 'Jean S. S. Steinberg ID 
attendance. He spoke briefl) on his 
work as Reitor, of the rechnological 

Institute oi Aeronautics. Sao lose Jus 
Campos. S.io Paulo. Brazil. Also pies 
ent at the meeting were student repre- 
sentatives from the professional socie- 
ties to discuss problems relative to 
alumni work and interests. 

Alumni Notes 

Fred A. Wybenga. '55. is currently 
uith Babcock and Wilcox Co. of Phila- 
delphia. He is in the Boiler Service 
Department. 

Francis M. Federline, Jr., '53 B.S.; 
'56 M.S.. is doing work on Air Surface 
W capons in the Structures Division at 
the Naval Ordnance Laboratory. White 
Oaks. Maryland. 

Textbooks Translated 

Spanish translation of Professor 
G. F. Corcoran's popular textbook on 
Alternating Current Circuits has been 
published by Compania Editorial Con- 
tinental S. A. in Mexico. A Portuguese 
translation of this book as well as a 
Portuguese translation of Corcoran's 
and Price's textbook Electronics is in 
progress in Brazil. 




Dr. Warren 

Dr. Warren Delivers Paper 

Dr. Thomas B. Warren. E.E. '48, re- 
cently delivered a technical paper on a 
remarkable new radio aid called the 
"Low-Noise Parametric Amplifier" at 
the Institute of Radio Engineers' Con- 
vention in New York. 

(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE. 1959 



Coleman & Wood, inc 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



SILVER SPRING 



MARYLAND 




Marenka Metal Mfg. Company, Inc. 
StcUiUjeAA, Steel 



SINKS 
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Phone 
SPruce 3-2600 



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CAFETERIA COUNTERS 
COOKING EQUIPMENT 

Bladensburg, Md. 
Hyottsville P.O. 





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Dispensing Eyeglasses 

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Dr. Warren in the manager ol the 
amplifier project .it ill laboratories. 
Suties. Neu Jersey. He described the 
main important applications ot the de- 
vice, which great!) improves radio re- 
ception in microwave bandwidths bj 
reducing interference caused bj heat 
and static electricity. 

LODGl R<>< m is i\ in mi Ft n ki 
Robert Lodge, Ml '40, spoke before 
the Management Club ot Radioplane 
( orporation, North Hollywood, Cali- 
fornia, recentl) on the plans being 
made at Rocketdvne (a division of 
North American Aviation. Inc.) for 
future rockets. One on the drawing 
boards now is an engine powerful 
enough to Lift a ship. Mr. Lodge said 
it will be ready within 25 years and will 
consist ot a cluster of four engines each 
capable of delivering five million 
pounds of thrust for a thrust total of 
20 million pounds. 

Possible uses for this cluster propul- 
sion system include placing a 300. 000 
pound space station into orbit, placing 
a 200.000 pound vehicle on the moon, 
or sending a 30-ton satellite into orbit 
around Mars. 48 million miles away. 

Bj way of contrast. Mr. Lodge also 
described an ion engine of such low 
power that it could not lift its own 
weight. As explained, the ion engine 
could be used with an Atlas ICBM for 
its Mars trip in about ten years. The 
stage carrying the ion engine would be 
orbited around the earth. Then the low- 
powered ion engine would be started. 
For some 15 to 20 days the vehicle 
would maintain its orbit, continually 
accelerating. Finally it would have the 
speed necessary to leave its earth orbit 
for the journev to Mars. 

According to Lodge, it is also quite 
possible that in about ten years, a 
single-chamber engine producing 5 mil- 
lion pounds of thrust will be available. 
It could put a 25-ton manned satellite 
on the moon complete with sufficient 
supplies to permit the expedition to re- 
main for exploration. Or this engine 
could thrust a 260. 000 pound satellite 
into orbit around the earth. 

Dr. Beam ro RPI 

Dr. Walter Beam (B V '47. MA. '50, 
Ph.D. '53 I has been appointed Head of 
the Department of Electrical Engineer- 
ing at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
in Troy, New York. He assumes his 
new post on July 1. Dr. Beam has been 
a Research Manager at the RCA Lab- 
oratories. One ot his accomplishments 
there has been the development of high- 
power, multiple-beam. electrostatic 
focus amplifiers. 



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38 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 



Rosa Lee Kime 



\\ \K\ I VND HOMl 1 ( ONOMK S 

ASSOCI vl ION HOI DS \NM M 

Ml I riNG in H u.l RSTOWN 

I ho program chairman for the Mary- 
land Homo Economics Association 
meeting held in Hagerstown, Maryland. 
March 13th and 14th was Anne 
Matthews, - 2 l ). The program featured 
tho 50th Anniversary of Homo Eco- 
DOmics. "The History of Homo Eco- 
DOmics in Maryland", written by Erna 
Roulol Chapman. '33, of Gambrills, 
Maryland, for her M.A. degree, was 
used as a basis for the program for the 
special anniversary luncheon. 

Mrs. Garey in Richmond, Virginia 

Since graduation. Jo Ann McLelland 
Garey. '56. has been with the Home 
Service Department of the Virginia 
Electric and Power Company in Rich- 
mond. As a Home Economist, her 
activities are varied; school demon- 
strations, home calls, test cooking and 
classes as well as aiding home owners 
in planning lighting and wiring for their 
homes are all part of her duties. 

Experienced Home Economists 
Needed 

The University has had calls from the 
International Cooperation Agency for 
experienced Home Economic Gradu- 
ates who can take two-year overseas 
assignments to develop Home Econom- 
ic programs in emerging countries. 

Faculty Activities 

Pela Braucher participated in the cabi- 
net meeting of the Maryland Home 
Economics Association in Hagerstown 
on January 10. 

Dean Selma Lippeatt worked with 
home economics teachers in Carroll 
County on January 30, examining pres- 
ent trends in home economics and home 
?conomics education. 

Eleanor Young recently conducted 
the evaluation of men's wash 'n wear 
>uits after the first established wear 
oeriod. This research project is a co- 
operative one between the College of 
Home Economics and the National 
nstitute of Drycleaners. Thirty-six 
nen, including faculty and business 
nen of College Park are test subjects. 
(Continued on next page) 

(•1AY-JUNE. 1959 



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Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



L\\W I R-PHARM \( is I Al)Ml I I 1 I) 

ro \\is< onsin Bar 

Paul A. Pumpian, '53, was recently ad- 
mitted to the Wisconsin Bar on the 
motion ol John \V. Reynolds, Attorney 

General ol the State ol Wisconsin. A 
member of the Maryland Bar since 

1953. Pumpian is a Registered Phar- 
macist in Maryland and Wisconsin and 
is also a registered Patent Attorne\ 
Formerly a member of the facult) ol 
the University of Maryland School of 
Pharmacy and subsequently a Patent 
Attorney for the E. R. Squibb & Sons 
Division of the Olin Mathieson Chemi- 
cal Corporation. Pumpian is now seiz- 
ing as the Executive Secretary of the 
Wisconsin State Board of Pharmacy. 

Alumni Association Banquet 

The Alumni Association of the L'ni- 
versity oi Maryland School of law 
has chosen its first woman President. 
She is petite, brunette Mar\ Arabian, 
class of '44 and a Baltimorean. and 
she won an ovation from the distin- 
guished group of judges and attorneys 
gathered for the association's annual 
banquet held April 1 1 at the Sheraton- 
Belvedere Hotel in Baltimore. 

Other officers, elected as the 
first order of business, were: first 
Vice-President Layman J. Red- 
den. '34. Denton: second Vice- 
President, Chiel Judge Emory H. 
N ilcs. '17. Supreme Bench of Bal- 
timore City; third Vice-President, 
Judge W. Albert Menchine. '29. 
Circuit Court oi Baltimore County. 
Towson: Secretary Treasurer. Pro- 
fessor G. Kenneth Reiblich. '29. 
Baltimore. 

Executive committee: Rignal 
Baldwin, '27. Baltimore: Thomas 
N. Berry, '40, Cumberland: Cla\- 
ton C. Carter. '46. Centerville: 
Richard W. Case. '42. Baltimore: 
Hamilton P. Fox, Jr.. '47. Salis- 
bury: David Harkness. '38, Prince 
Frederick; Kenneth C. Proctor. 
'32, Baltimore County; J. Hodge 




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40 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Smith, ;i ». Rockville; Marvin H 
Smith, '41, Denton; and Leonard 
Weinberg, M i) . Baltimore 
[be outgoing President, Benjamin B. 
Rosenstock, acted .is banquet toast- 
master. He introduced guests of honor 
\lhm O, Kuhn, Executive Vice Presi- 
dent of the University; Chief Judge 
Simon I Sobeloff, '15, U. S. Fourth 
Circuit Conn ol Appeals; Judges W. 
Calvin Chesnut, ' l) 4. Roszel C. [horn- 
sen, '22, and R. Dorsej Watkins, "25. 
U. S. District Court: Chief Judge Fred- 
erick W. Brune. Court ol Appeals of 
Maryland; Attorney General C. Ferdi- 
nand Sybert, "25; and Icon H. A. 
Pierson, '23, U. S. Attorney for Mary- 
land. 

Roger Howell. Dean of the School 
ot Law, welcomed the graduating class 
to its membership in the association 
and announced the winners of scholas- 
tic awards. 1 he highest honor went to 
I Paul Rogers, editor of the Mary- 
land law Review, who received the 
Elizabeth Maxwell Carroll Chesnut 
Prize as the student considered "most 
distinguished in scholarship in the 
ad sense.'' Others honored were: 

Order of the Coif. David E. 
Aldridge. Paul E. Burke, Jr., John 
C. Eldridge. Nelson R. Kerr. Jr., 
Lynn F Meyers, J. Paul Rogers, 
and Charles H. Wheatley. III. 
Honorary membership, Hon. Ros- 
zel C. Thomsen. 

Maryland Law Review Certifi- 
cates. John D. Alexander. Jr., 
Donald C. Allen. Brodnax Cam- 
eron. Jr., Roy Dragone, Douglas 
R. Due. Martin A. Dyer, John C. 
Eldridge, Nelson R. Kerr. Jr.. 
Lynn F. Meyers, William J. Pitt- 
ler. J. Paul Rogers. S. Leonard 
Rottman. Russell W. Shipley, and 
Ernest J. Weiss. Jr. 

The Sam Allen Memorial 
(Continued on next page) 



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41 



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Prize, Nelson R. Kerr. Jr.; Lawyers 
Title Insurance corporation Prize, 
J. Paul Rogers; The Nu Beta 
Epsilon Prize, John D. Alexander. 
Jr.: Samuel S. Levin Prize, Roy 
Dragone; and f . S. Law it 
Award. S. Leonard Rottman 
I he Assistant Attorney General of 

the United States. George C. Doub. 
'26, who addressed the association, said 
that the law school faculty had con- 
tributed to "new energy in American 
legal life today." He spoke particularly 

Of the activities Ol Dean Howell as a 
member ol the National Conference ol 
Commissioners on Uniform State Laws 
and of the Sobeloff Commission, of Pro- 
fessor G. Kenneth Reiblich. who re- 
wrote the Police Commissioner's digest 
of laws in 1939 and is currently Execu- 
tive Secretary of the Maryland Self 
Survey Commission, and of Professor 
I Whiting Farinholt's activities in the 
medico-legal field. 

Speaker Doub also recalled that our 
current codes of legal ethics stem from 
the initial work of David Hoffman. 
who established the first law course in 
Maryland in 1817 and who had been 
elected the first professor of law in 
1813. He described in stimulating 
fashion the challenge of handling the 
civil litigation of the United States in 
foreign courts and emphasized the im- 
portance of honoring the rule of law 
in all dealings between nations as well 
as between their citizens. 

Thomas B. Finan. Jr.. class of '39 
and Maryland's Secretary of State. 
brought greetings to the gathering for 
Governor J. Millard Tawes, who was 
unable to attend. 

Cook Joins Republic Steel 

A. Samuel Cook. '46. recently joined 

the industrial relations sta'T of Republic 
Steel Corporation as a labor attorney , 
He has previously served as Labor Re- 
lations Manager of the Davison Chem- 
ical Division of W. R. Grace & Co.. 
Baltimore. Prior to joining Davison in 
1954. he had worked for three years 
in Washington in various phases of 
labor legislation and labor administra- 
tion. From 1947 to 1951, he had been 
engaged in the general practice of law. 
including labor relations, with the firm 
oi Piper and Marbury in Baltimore. 

He is a member of the Maryland and 
a former Vice President and Director 
of the Baltimore Junior Association of 
Commerce. 

Badenhoop Promoted 

H. John Badenhoop. Arts & Sciences 
'42; l.L.B. "49. was one of six members 



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42 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



OJ the home office shifl oi St. Paul F. & 

\l. and St. Paul Mercury Insurance 
i ompan) to be promoted recently. \ii 
Badenhoop started with the companj 
in 1954 as special agent at Jacksonville. 
In 1955 he was transferred to the home 
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marine department. His recent promo- 
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School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



Traditional Pharmacology 
Christmas Party Honors 
Dr. Pincoffs 
The traditional pre-Christmas luncheon 
and reception held on December 17. 
1958, honored Dr. Maurice C. Pincoffs. 
Emeritus Professor of Medicine at the 
Universitj . 

With more than two-score faculty 
members and guests of the Department 
of Pharmacology gathered in the de- 
partmental library. Dr. J. C. Krantz 
acted as host and Master of Cere- 
monies. Following luncheon. Dr. Wilson 
H. Elkins, President of the University, 
spoke briefly and Dr. Pincoffs was 
presented with a citation by Governor 
Theodore R. McKeldin. Dr. Pincoffs 
then spoke briefly on some highlights 
of American medical history. 

Alumni Hold Reception and 
Oyster Roast 
As a part of the program of social 
activities attendant upon the postgrad- 
uate conference in medicine held at the 
School of Medicine January 20-22, the 
Medical Alumni Association held a 
most successful oyster roast at the 
104th Medical Armory. More than 150 
medical alumni and faculty attended. 

North Carolina Alumni Note 
The University of Maryland Medical 
Alumni Association dinner held annu- 
ally in conjunction with the North 
Carolina State Medical Convention was 
held on May 4, 1959 at the George 
Vanderbilt Hotel in Asheville, N. C. 

Dr. Patricia Dodd of the class of 
1944 was chairman of the dinner plans. 

Dr. William H. Triplett 

Honored 

Dr. William H. Triplett, Director of 

the Medical Alumni Association, prom- 

(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE, 1959 



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43 



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merit alumnus, and a retired Colonel 
in the Medical ( Orps, \ I S., has been 
recently promoted to the rank of Briga- 
dier General in the Maryland National 
Guard (retired). In commenting on 
this honor. Dr. I nplett stated that it 
came as a complete surprise: however, 
further inqinrv revealed that the pro- 
motion was made In den. Milton H. 
Reckord, Adjutant General of \l.irv- 
land, with the support and complete ap- 
proval oi (n>\. rheodore K. McKeldin. 

Dk. I hi i Mu in Honor] d in 

Pi I Kill kit W \l l MM 

The following article bj Louis Sanchez 

( apa recently appeared in San Juan's 

leading newspaper. // Mundo. 

PROFESSOR FROM BA1 tlMORE COMES 

ON VACATION INVITED BY GRATEH 1 

\1 I MM 

The generosity of several Puerto 
Rican doctors made possible for an 
esteemed German professor, doctored 
in anatomy, who had never boarded a 
plane, to take one to make his first visit 
to Puerto Rico. 

That happened to Dr. Eduard L'hlen- 
huth. 73 \ears of age. retired Professor 
from the School of Medicine of the 
University of Maryland in Baltimore. 
Dr. L'hlenhuth was invited to spend one 
week in Puerto Rico by the group of 
"Maryland doctors" he had taught 
anatomy during the years that he was 
actively teaching. 

The idea to bring the professor to 
Puerto Rico is credited to a group of 
alumni among whom were Drs. Jose M. 
Torres. Armando Saavedra. Jose S. 
Licha. Guillermo Pico. Luis Guzman- 
Lopez, and who with others made the 
realization of this idea possible. 

Who is this professor that deserves 
such a special treat? The answer has 
been gi\en to us by Dr. Jose Manuel 
Torres. 

Dr. Torres tells us that Dr. Lhlen- 
huth. who retired from teaching in 
1^54. started to teach Anatomy at the 
University of Maryland in the year 
1925. Through those 2 l > years, Dr. 
Uhlenhuth had among his pupils about 
60 or 70 Puerto Rican students who 
today are doctors, the majority of 
whom are practicing in our island. 

Dr. L'hlenhuth always showed special 
mtcrcst in his Puerto Rican pupils. He 
did not limit his duty .is a teacher to 
help his pupils solve the multiple prob- 
lems that would normally appear to a 
group of students who were so far away 
from home. Specifically, he often took 
many of those students to his home in 
Baltimore during Paster. 1 hanksgiving. 
and Christmas times. In other words. 



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Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

Distributors 
Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 

FREDERICK. MD. 



44 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



he invited the students to his homo .<i .1 
time when the) most recalled theirs. In 
this manner he helped the Puerto 
Ricans that were luck] enough to be in 

his class to tolerate better their separa- 
tion from then families. 

It is in effect the opinion ot the 
Puerto Rican doctors who were once 
his pupils in anatomy, that Dr. Uhlen- 
huth telt a special pleasure and satis 
on as he helped them. He always 
treated them with respect and distinc- 
tion. 

IV I hlenhuth has obtained prom- 
inence in the held ot anatomy. He has 
to his name numerous articles on thy- 
roid research and other studies on 
different anatomical aspects of the 
pelvis. Being German by birth, he 
came to the United States in 1914. to 
do thyroid research at the Rockefeller 
Institute in New York City. In 1925 
he began his teaching career at the 
University of Maryland forming part 
of the faculty of the Department of 
\natomy. It was not long before he 
was made Professor and Head of the 
Department. 

Mread) in Puerto Rico his grateful 
pupils have tried to make Dr. Uhlen- 
huth's stay in the island as pleasant as 
possible. Last night, a dinner was given 
in his honor at Cecilia's Place. Santurce, 
which was attended by over 35 physi- 
cians who were accompanied by their 
vives. Among them were Drs. Victor 
Montilla and Perez, who were the first 
and last Puerto Rican students, taught 
by Dr. Uhlenhuth respectively. 

Public Health Service 

Announces Change in 

International Immunization 

Requirements 

The division of Foreign Quarantine of 
ithe United States Public Health Service 
jhas recently issued a revision of the 
booklet entitled Immunization Informa- 
tion for International Travel (Public 
Health Service Publication No. 384, 
Revised June, 1958). This interesting 
and inclusive volume contains all perti- 
nent data relating to immunization re- 
quirements of persons traveling abroad. 
It may be obtained from the Superin- 
tendent of Documents. Washington 25, 
D. C, 30c a copy. 

Doctor Snyder Honored 

Dr. Merrill J. Snyder, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Bacteriology, was re- 
cently elected President of the Mary- 
land Branch of the Society of American 
Bacteriologists. Dr. Snyder will serve 
in this capacity during the year 1959. 

MAY-JUNE. 1959 





SeaV^w 




MASON CANNING COMPANY, INC. 

POCOMOKE CITY. MARYLAND 



Serving the Farm Since 1913 

The Shore's Finest Fertilizer 

THE WORCESTER FERTILIZER COMPANY 

SNOW HILL, MD. 



jbeUciotui 




BAKED TO 

STAY FRESH 

LONGER 

STAR BAKING COMPANY, Crisfield, Md. 



m 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON, MD. 
Phone TA 2-3000 



Salisbury Milling Co. 

Incorporated 

Salisbury's Best 

Broiler - Laying - Hog 

FEEDS 

Corn Goods - Eshelman Feeds 

Salisbury, Md. 



BANK OF CRISFIELD 

Dependable Service Since 1893 
MARION BRANCH— Phone 2381 
UPTOWN BRANCH— Phone 312 
MAIN OFFICE— Phone 102 

Member Federal Deposit Ins. Corp. 



45 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

of GREATER WASHINGTON 

IT'S THE 



Suburban 



Trust 



Company 



14 OFFICES TO SERVE YOU 
3°o Interest on Savings 



Administration Building 

6495 New Hampshire Ave., HyaWsvIlle. Md. 

HYATTSVILLE — SILVER SPRING 

JUniper 8-5000 Member F.D.I.C. 



School of 

NURSING 



# * # 

SUBSCRIBE 

TO THE 
MARYLAND 

MAGAZINE 

# • * 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



Lillie M. Largey 



\ I I I \ HON 

Need a supplement to sour income? 
Know ol someone who needs a job? 
We need a person to assist with tluting 
process of the University of Maryland 
graduate nurses' Florence Nightingale 
caps. 

Must live in U. S. A. Provide a 
growing, steady income. Nurses pay 
sou for mailing and fluting process. 
Operates on a private basis. 

Address your letter to: 

Nurses' Alumnae Association 
Box 2 

University Hospital 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Letters 

Charlotte Halter (Mrs. Michael 

Iacona) Class of 1948 

7 Continental Drive. Middletown. 

Rhode Island. 

Dear Bessie: 

It seems as though the only time I 
get a chance to write you is at Christmas 
time or if I didn't get my Alumnae 
Bulletin or a birth. Thank goodness for 
Christmas. Hope you are fine and as 
chipper and smiling as ever, ["nought 
sure I would get to our class reunion. 
but it was impossible. We were expect- 
ing orders any day and they finally ar- 
rived the da) after and we did not have 
to move at all as Michael remains here 
for his sea duty. Yes. we have another 
addition. Nov. 10th a boy. David Paul, 
weight ten pounds and four ounces. 
And he is a real cute baby. Looks like 
my hubby. 

Regards to Ike — sure would love to 
see you all — one of these days maybe. 
Best wishes to all of my friends. 

Charlotte 

Barbara Biehl (Mrs. Nelson C. Baker. 

Jr.) Class of 1956 

609 Piedmont Avenue. Apt. No. 4. 

Cumberland. Maryland. 

January. 1959 

Dear Mis Arnurius: 

Just a little note to let you know o\ 
our change in address. We are cer- 
tainlv enjoying Cumberland and its 
mountains. 

Nelson completed his two years 
active duty with "Uncle Sam" and has 
now accepted a position with the 




FOR 

FUN 
FRIENDS 

AND 
FITNESS 

Join the 

Y. M. C. A. 

Ted Englehardt, A. I. A. 



Jfuller & u'2lbert 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 

Since 1920 



Phone— EXeeiitive 3-8120 



815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



46 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZ'NE 



Upjohn Pharmaceutical Company. 
One thing for sure, is that I wall be ac 
quainted with some ol the now druga 
Oui son, Nelson, is now ten months 
old. He can really keep me stepping 
and is ol course the apple ot our eye 
Please give mj regards to everyone. 
Sincerely . 

Barbara Biehl Baker 

Inez Parks (Mrs. Warren I. Crispens) 

c lass ol 1950 

1708 Longfellow Street. Greensboro, 

North Carolina. 

December, i l » s s 

Dear N Irs. Arnurius: 

\l\ lather gave me sour letter. We 
moved to Greensboro two years ago. 
M\ husband has recently gone back 
ur.h Eli Lilly as a drug salesman and 
we shall again move to Portsmouth, 
\ irginia alter the first of the year. I 
have three sons, ages, six, four and 
fourteen months. Hope to get back 
into nursing when I get the last one in 
kindergarten. So nice to hear from 
you and I shall send my new address 
as soon as we move. 
Sincerely. 

Inez Parks Crispens 

General News 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Seniff moved 
recently to Scottsdale, Arizona. They 
urite that they like it very much. Mrs. 
Seniff was Martha Smith, '55. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Thorson are 
now living in Urbana, Illinois. Mrs. 
Thorson was Virginia Speer, '55. 

Dr. and Mrs. George R. Callender, 
Jr.. have adopted two children, a boy 
land a girl. Mrs. Callender was Helen 
'Welham. '43. 

Barbara A. Peterson. '57, writes, "I 
received my Masters' Degree from 
Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, in 
August, 1958. I am presently an in- 
structor in Maternal and Child Health 
Nursing at the Washington Hospital 
Center, Washington. D. C. — and enjoy 
it tremendously." 

Captain and Mrs. George R. Hurd. 
; and three children are stationed in 
Law ton. Oklahoma. Mrs. Hurd was 
Clara Lebeck, '43. 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Barchet are 
living in Melrose, Massachusetts. Mrs. 
Barchet was Nancy Gooke, '55. And 
also living in the same town are Dr. 
and Mrs. Henry A. Baer. Mrs. Baer 
jwas Carolyn Myers, '53. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burton M. Day, have 
'moved to 10020 Des Moines Way. 
Seattle 88, Washington. Mrs. Day was 
Betty Suzanne Schiffbauer, '52. 
(Continued on page 51) 




Completely Modern 

Throughout For Your 

Dining Enjoyment 

Ledo 
Restaurant 

2420 UNIVERSITY 

LANE 

Hyattsville, Md. 

Superbly Prepared Food 



• AMERICAN AND ITALIAN CUISINE 
• PIZZA PIES BAKED TO ORDER 
• BEVERAGES AND MIXED DRINKS 



Phone: HArrison 2-8622 



• COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
• INCREASED SEATING 
• BANQUET FACILITIES 

Phone: Harrison 2-8122 



ELECTRONIC WHOLESALERS, inc. 

2345 Sherman Ave., N.W. HU 3-5200 Washington, D. C. 

Specializing in all of the 
Great Brand Names in 

HIGH FIDELITY 



Visit Our Sound Room — Plenty of Free Parking 



Garamond Press 




15 SOUTH FREDERICK STREET • BALTIMORE 2, MARYLAND 
YEARBOOKS • CATALOGUES • PERIODICALS • LIMITED EDITIONS 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO Inc. 


Link Belt Company 


"Pyrene" & 


"MSA" Industrial 


Power Transmission 


• "CO-TWO" 


• Gas Masks. Canisters 


Supplies 


Fire Extinguishers 


& First Aid Equipment 


2600 12th STREET, N.E. 


WASHINGTON 18. D. 


C. LAwrence 6-1362 



MAY-JUNE. 1959 



47 



jfiartln 3 *°* 

FINE CHINA 

SILVER 

CRYSTAL 

ART OBJECTS 

LAMPS 

OCCASIONAL FURNITURE 

ANTIQUES 

1223 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

EX 3-2778 

Catalogue Upon Request 




MUlberry 5-2823 Established 1876 

MEMBER ABAA 
OLD, RARE AND OUT-OF-PRINT BOOKS 
MARYLAND BOOKS - SCHOLARLY BOOKS 

805 N. HOWARD ST. 
Baltimore 1, Md. 
ALLEN W. SCHULTZ 




4? 



04, 



By suit i \m\ OGD1 N 

Win s the months of May and June 
arrive in all their splendor, fashion 
notes are particulars directed to the 
fair sex. But. men's fashions continue 
to change almost as rapidly as the dear 
ladies do. so we talked to Albert H. 
Morns, president of SOUTHCOMB, 
INC., 109 East Baltimore Street. Balti- 
more. Maryland, to find out about 
mens hat st\les for spring and summer. 

The firm is Baltimore"s largest Hat- 
ters. I hey ha\e been ser\ing Gov- 
ernors. Mayors and other distinguished 
citizens of Maryland since 1885. 

Southcomb's will be ready for the 
coming straw hat season by featuring 
the new stiff straw in various shapes, 
such as the center crease and telescope 
crowns. The regular stiff straw or sailor 
seems to be in for a banner season, 
they will be trimmed with black and 
fancy bands. 

Among other braids to be shown will 
be the popular cocoanuts for the young 
man. Telescopes. Center Crease. Pinch 
Front. Sunk Tips and other crowns to 
go with brims measuring one and five- 
eights to two and five-eights inches. 

The regular panama in the conserva- 
tive pinch front and the Homburg sty le 
will be shown in brim widths up to two 
and three-quarters inches. 



-A Well Stressed V]an 


/ ( ears 


a Mat 


SOUTHCOMB 




S8i 


MEN'S HATS 




Cs © 


STETSON HAT QUARTERS 










109 E. BALTIMORE STREET 

BALTIMORE, MD 


1 


.Eiinqton 9-S799 



Mantdcito 



Milans will also be in good taste 
various shapes and colors, such as ligi 
tan. tan. brown and gray, and the 
colorful bands are beautiful. 

Besides the braids mentioned one ca 
find a complete line of the new Raffi 
Panalite. Row and Row Milan in mar 
st\les and also a complete line of Spo 
hats and caps in straw and madai; 
grass. 

» * * * 

The season of the bride is here toi 
t <nd we called on Mr. Roy Pin-- 
MARTINS. INC. of 1223 Connectici 
Avenue. Washington. D. C. as Martin 
is THE Bridal Shop in Washington. 

The firm has devoted more than thn. 
decades to selecting fine china. >. 
and silver and to assembling a distil 
guished collection of antiques, lamp 
objets dart and occasional furnitur 
tor their trade. 



i, AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 



•i 
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BLACK/ E 5, 



1217 - 22nd STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



UNIVERSAL ELECTRO 
PLATING COMPANY, Inc. 




'id Georgetown 5 nee 1929 



SPECIALIST 
in 

ANTIQUE 
SILVER 



Copper and Brass Restoration 
Quality Work — Prompt Service 

Hours: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. doily 
9 o.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday 
- ock Below M St. N.W.) 

1067 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. 
FE 3-2460 Washington, D. C. 



48 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZIN 



tf 



amen 



Since the beginning of the European 
china industry in the earlj ISth century, 
British firms have designed china for 
the Ro\.il and leading families of 
I mope. Among the tine china at the 
Martin Companj are elegant choices of 
some of these same firms, who have 
continued to manufacture china through 
ihe \ears. Represented among them are 
Spode. Royal Crown Derby, Wedg- 
wood. Royal Doulton, Minton, Royal 
Worcester and Coalport. 

French. Dutch. Italian and main 
domestic chinas are among the Martin 
^election as well as crystal from The 
Netherlands. Belgium. France, England, 
Sweden and our own American Glass- 
\.ire. 



Bon Ton 

SARATOGA CHIPS 

distributed by 

BON TON SARATOGA 

CHIP DISTRIBUTORS 

Reor— 1229 D St.. S.E. 

LI. 3-4848 Washington 




For All Your Floral Needs 
Plants 
Corsages 
Bouquets 



INC. 

NAtional 8-0106 FLORISTS 

900 Fourteenth St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 

hiSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS» 




Antiques of silver, porcelain and 
crystal mellowed by the years which 
have a history dating back to the days 
of post-Renaissance, can be found at 
this fine store. An individual antique 
history card accompanies each such 
article. 

Bride registry service is a two-genera- 
tion tradition at Martin's. Guided by a 
member of the firm, who is familiar 
with the full range of the store's collec- 
tion, a bride will be able to select her 
choice of crystal, silver and china. The 
patterns will be registered so that those, 
who wish to present a gift, may do so 
with full assurance that it is a part of 
a coordinated plan. 

Mr. Pingo has been with the Martin 
Company for the past nine years. He 
was tutored in the trade by the late 
Mrs. Carl Martin, founder of the busi- 
ness, and three years ago was made 
general manager and buyer of china, 
crystal, gifts and occasional furniture. 

At 35 his experiences include three 



sSSSSSSSSZ 

ZJke Shade Shop 

and AFFILIATED PRODUCTS 

2214 M Street, N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

FEderal 7-1200 




Manufacturers and Distributors 

•fa Window Shades 

it Venetian Blinds 

fa Folding Doors 

fa Draperies and Rods 

•fa Screens 

•fa Inside Shutters 

-fa Porch Shades 

fa Vertical Blinds 

•fa Decorative Wood Coverings 



Jp5=«g88«S«^ggg5r>8gSg5»^5?Sg^5??^ 



^J~or (a/ua litu Mo u L^an ~Jrui'i 



CARPET CENTER 




Thompson Furniture Co. 

furniture of Quality 
at Reasonable Prices 

MODERN & PERIDD 

SIMMONS, KROEHLER, THOMASVILLE, 
BASSETT, GEM CRIB & CRADLE, LANE 

1810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E. 
Washington, D. C. LA 6-1622 



"Washington's Best Restaurant" ma 

H olid jy Magazine ( 4th Consecutive Year) ril : * 

"One of America's Ten Best" 

National Poll 

OCCIDENTAL 

: jj".£ 

Where Statesmen Dine 

1411 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. |S 

Between the Washington & Willord Hotels it-isast 

Open Daily & Sunday 11:30 A.M. - 1:00 A.M. 
Telephone 01. 7-6467 

Five Beautifully Appointed Rooms Catering To Parties. Meetings And Banquets Accor 

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nodating 10 To 250 Persons 



'^AY-JUNE. 1959 



49 



Q 



osi 



MasuflcMxIl W&mest 




NEWEST member of 
the KING FAMIL Y - 

KING 

VERSATOL 

KLEENER 

Cleans Everything! 




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MANGELS HEROLD CO., BALTIMORE 30, MD. 




VUlaqe, SJiap 

PRINCt GEORGES PINE5T MEN'5 WEAR 5T0R& 



Botany "500" and Hyde Park Clothes 

Dobbs Hats - Bostonian Shoes 

6033 Baltimore Blvd. (between Riverdale and Hyattsville) 

UNion 4-1312 



SALISBURY RUG COMPANY 



700 N. SALISBURY BLVD. 

Phone PI 2-1129 

RUGS PICKED UP 

CLEANED AND STORED 

Complete Carpet Service 

Repairs — Alterations 



SALISBURY. MD. 





Cleaning of 
Oriental and 
Domestic Rugs 



50 



yean in the Army Engineers ( ,>rps i 
the South Pacific after which he ca» 
to Washington to work in the c - 
respondence section on the then Gil 
eral Eisenhower staff at the PentagJ 
before joining the Martin firm. He p ■ 
ticipates in civic affairs relative to . 
position and has designed the Marti. 
Perpetual I roph\ for the lnternatioi 
Jumping Competition awarded anr 
ally at the Washington Horse Show. 

He was recently elected to the Boa 
of Directors of the Connecticut 
Merchants Association. 

Mr. Pingo has written a number 
fine articles including one for the rece 
Washington Flower Show M 
He will be a judge this year at the a 
nual Bureau of Aeronautics Collecto 
Show . 

He is an amateur actor in local dr 
matic groups and enjoys all of the Ar 



For you who want to keep 
precious furs looking better, longer- 
we pass along these fur-care tips fro 
James Swartz o\ MANO SWARl 
FURS. 225 N. HOWARD ST.. Ball 
more. 

Mr. Swartz tells us that furs shouldr 
be allowed to become water-so; 
Over-dampness tends to destroy tr 
hair and is likely to injure the curt 
skin. Even fur taken from a wate 
animal such as seal, beaver, otter i 
nutria is injured by water just as muc 
as other peltries. 

Now. thanks to a newlj develope 
scientific method, furs may be weathe 
proofed, and the possibility of mattin 
and crushing is minimized. 

With this new process, develope 
especially for furs, your coat. jack. 
stole will have a new lustre and will b 
resistant to the moisture of rain. - 
or sleet. 

Mr. Swartz also told us that in th 
event your fur becomes drenched, am 
has not been weatherproof ed. send it ti 
a furrier immediately. Do not place i 
near a radiator or other source of heat 
Intense heat of any kind causes th. 
skins to become brittle and dry am 
whole sections of fur may fall out 
Damp furs should be dried gradual!) 
in a room of even temperature with . 
good circulation of air. 

If you want to avoid the p. 
dangers of soaked fur ask v ' 
Swartz to weatherproof your furs wher 
you have them stored. 

Incidentally. James Swartz is a 
uate of the University of Maryland anc 
is always willing and able to help you 
w ith any of your fur problems. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



School oj 
Vursing 



(Continued from (m^, 47) 



Margaret Albena Janovitch, '46, h;is 
been an air tine hostess for the 
i \v \ foi about ten years. Mos1 oi 

hei tliiihts arc overseas. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frederick C onnellx 
have returned from their two year staj 
in French Morocco and are now living 
in Holbrook. Massachusetts. Mrs. Con- 
nellj was Nellie Pardew, '55. 

See Social Notes Section for more news 
Oi Nursing Alumnae. 

New Nursing Program 
1 he University of Maryland will in- 
augurate a new program of nursing 
administration in September. 1959. 

The new program will be conducted 
under the special direction of Dr. 
Florence Gipe. Dean of the School of 
Nursing. She will be assisted by other 
faculty members of the School, as well 

i as Mr. Lad F. Grapski. Director of 
University Hospital, Miss Aurelia C. 
Willers. Director of the Hospital's nurs- 

: ing service, and faculty members of the 
C ollege of Business and Public Admin- 
istration. 

The three-semester course of study, 
leading toward the Master of Science 
or Master of Arts degree and a special 
certificate, will include field work and 
internship in administration, in cooper- 

i ation with other Baltimore hospitals. 
The curriculum is approved by the 
Southern Regional Education Board. 

Applicants will be required to have 
an exceptional background in both 
clinical nursing and business administra- 
tion. Graduates are expected to help 
meet the increasing need for executives 
in the field of nursing in Maryland and 
throughout the South. 



School of 

PHARMACY 



Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 



Forty-four Students on 
Honor Roll 
Dean Noel E. Foss announced that 
twelve freshmen, five sophomores, 10 
juniors and 17 seniors made the Dean's 
Honor Roll for the first semester. These 
^students include — freshmen: Nancy 
(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE. 1959 



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LUNCHEONS 



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shade trees. Many varieties of cut flowers in season, 
Corsages always available at — 

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Ridqeville, Md. Phone Mt. Airy 40 

On U. S. Route 40, only 32 miles west of Baltimore 



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Competent experienced surgical fitters in attendance 
Equipment and Supplies for the 




HOSPITAL 

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serving the medical profession 

for over a third of a century 1421 MARYLAND AVENUE . BALTIMORE 1, MD. 

SARATOGA 7-7333 



COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, INC. 

1520 K St., N. W. AP 7-8200 

SEVEN CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 

John M. Conroy 



51 



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First Name in fee Cream 
For Over A Half Century 




BALTIMORE. MD. 



Gibbon, John Grubb, Louis Ctubinsk\. 
Sydne) Hamet, Paul Jablon. Robert 
Kantorski, John Loy, Walter Mackay, 
Allan Pristoop, Edward Roth. Susan 
SiegeL. and Hcnr\ Sugcrman. SOPHO- 
MORES: June Eng, Lois Lee, Harvey 
Reisenweber, Vito Tinelli, and Walter 
Walkling. n niors: Louis Friedman, 
Henrj Glick, Ronald Goldner, Joseph 
Handelman. John I Jordan. Irvin 
I e\m. Irving Raksin. Morton Rich- 
man. Peter Scali, Martin Shargei, and 
John Warthen. si NIORS : John Becker. 
Stanley Becker. Carl (apian. Melvin 
Chaiet, Paul Friedlander. William 
dray. Earl Klioze, Bam Levin, Harr> 
Macks. Eutenie Marshall. Larry 
Pozanek, Herbert Sachs. Marvin 
Suontz. Sorell Schwartz. Alfred 
Schwartzman, Murray Spear and Shel- 
don Friedlander. 

Faculty News 
Dr. Leslie Costello. Assistant Professor 
in Zoology, v%as married to the former 
Anne Louise Hill on January 24th. 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos. Associate 
Professor in Pharmaceutical Chemistr\. 
and his wife were blessed uith their fifth 
daughter. Gail Susan, on February 
19th. 

Mr. Phillip J. Levine. Instructor in 
Pharmacy, was guest speaker at the 
last meeting of the Maryland Associa- 
tion of Hospital Pharmacists. His talk 
was entitled. "Future Dosage Forms". 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos. Associate 
Professor in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 
presented a two hour seminar at the 
Anne Arundel County Science Seminar. 
Members of the Seminar include forty 
high school students gifted in science 
who were selected by competitive ex- 
amination from the high schools in the 
northern half of the county. Dr. Shay, 
Professor of Microbiology, is a member 
of the committee which plans the pro- 
grams for these gifted children. The 
title of Dr. Doorenbos's lecture was. 
"Drugs. From Pill to Patient." 

Mr. Nagin Patel. Assistant Instruc- 
tor in Pharmacy, is a very talented 
musician. He plays the Tabla which is 
an Indian drum played to accompan> 
singing and dancing. In the past two 
months. Mr. Patel has played the 
drums at affairs held in Baltimore. 
Washington. D. C. and Philadelphia. 
He has also made a guest appearance on 
W U S T. These affairs have included 
the Diwali, "Festival of Lights" (equiv- 
alent to New Year's eve). Republic 
Da) of India which was held on Jan- 
uary 26th and a banquet sponsored by 
the Wine and Food Society of Balti- 
more at uhich they sampled Indian 
food. 



JAMES POSEY 

and 
ASSOCIATES 



Consulting 



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52 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Alumni Ni ws 

\ii Lee 1 Gibson, Vice-President ol 
I akeside I aboratories, Milwaukee, Wis 
consin addressed the Baltimore Branch 
ot the Vmerican Pharmaceutical ta 
sociation oh rhursda> evening, March 
1 2th m the I ecture Room at the School 
ol Pharmacy, in his address, "Some- 
thing Wont Wrong. - ' he presented the 
results ot a survej which disclosed the 

loss ot s.iles ot prescriptions because 
the pharmacists to whom the prescrip- 
tions were taken earned inadequate 
stocks ot the items specified 

Dr. Kenneth E. Hamlin, who was 
\s- stant Director of Chemical Re- 
search at Abbott Laboratories, has been 
promoted to Director and will be in 
charge of organic chemistry, physical 
chemistr) and microchemistr\ as well 
as the scientific library and science in- 
formation center. Dr. Hamlin earned 
his B. S. in Pharmacy in 1938 and 
Ph.D. in 1941 at the University of 
Maryland. 

Mr Israel T. Reamer. Ph.D. 1924, 
Chief Pharmacist at the Duke Univer- 
sit\ Hospital. Durham. North Carolina. 
was recently honored by the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 
tor "exceptional and meritorious serv- 
ice to the advancement of public health 
and welfare." Mr. Reamer is a Past 
President of the American Society of 
Hospital Pharmacists and served as the 
organization's first Secretary. 



DEMENTI STUDIO PHOTO 




Mr. Wright 



Promoted 



Lawrence M. Wright, '23, has been 

named Director of Special Services for 

(Continued on next page) 



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53 



TOWN REINFORCED 

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Inc. 

Placing, Reinforcing 

Steel and Concrete 

• 

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Welding Specialists 

• 

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53rd ANNIVERSARY 
Organized 1906 




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savings accounts - liberal dividends 

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7 to 9 Tuesday evening 

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Baltimore 25, Md. ELgin 5-9300 



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COMPANY 

MUlberry 5-2847 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



\ H Robins ( ompany, toe, oi Rich- 
mond. Virginia, one of the 10 largest 
pharmaceutical manufacturers in the 
I ruled States Wright Has formed) 
Assistant Sales Manager lor Rohins. He 
will now head a new department work- 
ing primarily with the sales, medical. 
idveitising and puhlic relations depart- 
ments to provide a wide variety of serv- 
ices to the medical, pharmaceutical and 
dental prolessions. He has been with 
the company since 1942. 

Student Activities 
Dr. Chester E. Poetsch of the Pharma- 
ceutical Chemistry Department. Smith. 
Kline, and French Laboratories pre- 
sented a lecture to the student body en- 
titled "The Design and Development of 
New Dosage Forms". The speaker ap- 
peared at the School of Pharmacy 
under the sponsorship of Rho Chi. 
pharmacy honorary fraternity. 

Thirty-eight students and wives, 
members of the junior and senior 
classes, were guests of Eli Lilly in Indi- 
anapolis for two days. They were ac- 
companied by Dr. Frank Slama. Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacognosy, and Mr. 
Tom Wright. Lilly representative on the 
trip. The students had a good time and 
learned a great deal about the opera- 
tions of a large pharmaceutical house. 



Alumni Association 
School of PHARMACY 
University of Maryland 

B. Olive Cole. Chairman 
Publications Committee 



The Annual Valentine Dance 

The annual entertainment and Valen- 
tine Dance of the Alumni Association 
of the School of Pharmacy was held 
in the ballroom of the Emerson Hotel. 
Baltimore. Maryland, on Thursday 
evening. February 12. 195^. 

This annual affair afforded an en- 
io\able evening for some five hundred 
persons who attended, including stu- 
dents and their ladies or escorts, faculty 
members, graduate students, invited 
guests, and about two hundred mem- 
bers of the Alumni Association and 
their wives 

Vice-President Victor H. Morgen- 
roth. Jr.. welcomed the group in at- 
tendance, and as General Chairman of 
the committees, presented the Alamedi- 
ans as the entertainers of the evening. 



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CHOICER MEATS 

Baltimore. Md. 



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— Air conditioned — 

Member Diner's Club and Universal 

Travel Card 



54 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



I he entertainmenl consisted ol several 

nKlivuiu.il solos, a duet, .1 dancei and .1 
oliloquy. rhe "Men ol Note" pro 
vided music foi the dance for siu- 
Jents and alumni young and old — 
nit il oik- o'clock James l'. Cragg, Jr.. 
Aas Chairman of the Entertainmenl 
Committee. 

lhe Souvenir Program was ol par- 
ieular interest, as it represented not 
Mils main hours ol work of the mem- 
bers of the Program Committee, but 
leveral thousand dollars for carrying on 
he work of the Association; this money 

included donations for advertisements 
rom manufacturers, wholesalers, re- 
.uleis. associated organizations, mem- 
ol the alumni and friends. The 
none) received from the Souvenir 
\ogram will be used for student aid 
md scholarships for first-year students 
n the School of Pharmacy, and include 
he full amount of tuition, books, etc. 
or a year. The Alumni Association 
ilso donates $400.00 annually for 
cholarships to members of the upper 
lasses, which is matched by a cor- 
esponding amount from the American 
oundation for Pharmaceutical Edu- 
ation. Milton A. Friedman was Chair- 
nan and George Stiffman Co-Chair- 
nan of the Program Committee. 

Dr. and Mrs. H. A. Brown Dunning. 
I >y their presence and graciousness, 
dded pleasure and prestige to the oc- 
asion and greatly pleased the members 
if the committees and also the mem- 
ers of the Association by their attend- 
nce. Dr. Dunning graduated from the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy in 
897, and during the early years be- 
ame an instructor and then Associate 
'rofessor. teaching chemistry in the 
•chool of Pharmacy of the University 
f Maryland. 

A brochure setting forth the life and 
ctivities of Dr. Dunning, was distrib- 
ted to every one in attendance. The 
rochure emphasized Dr. Dunning's 
:adership in pharmacy, and enum- 
rated the honorary degrees and awards 
estowed upon him. The brochure also 
rew particular attention to the Ameri- 
an Institute of Pharmacy in Wash- 
lgton, of which Dr. Dunning was a 
x>nsor, and to Dunning Hall, the 
uilding of the School of Pharmacy of 
ie University of Maryland which was 
;cently dedicated in honor of Dr. 
)unning. 

George Stiffman was chairman of the 
icket Committee, with Morris Cooper 
*s Co-Chairman; they had the coopera- 
•on of the alumni and students in 



and appreciative 



-^curing a large 
ttendance. 



(Continued on next page) 

, AY-JUNE. 1959 



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55 



CARLEA 

The House of 
BRAND NAME 

Sanitation Chemicals 

AND 

Janitor Supplies 
SIMONIZ 

— Cleaners and Waxes 

BRILLO 

— Steel Wool Floor and 
Hand Pads 

BLACK & DECKER 

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Vacuums 

GENERAL 

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Scrubbing & Polishing Machines 

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516 W. Franklin St. 
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VISIT 

Bernie Lee's 

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(Newly renovated) 

OPEN DAILY 8 a.m. — 2 a.m. 
serving 

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LUNCHEON 

DINNER 

5 — Spacious Banquet Rooms 
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Samuel A. Goldstein was chairman 
of the Place and Arrangements Com- 
mittee and supervised the serving of ice 
cream and cake provided through the 
courtesy of the Hendler Ice Cream 
Company. 

Prizes were provided by the H. B. 
(nlpin Company, the Whitman Candy 
Company and the I. & L. Candy and 
Tobacco Company. Mr. Hedeman of 
the Gilt Edge Photo Service. Inc. pro- 
vided photographs of the part\. 

I he following constitute the \er\ 
active Student Recruitment Committee 
of the Alumni Association: H. Nelson 
Warfield. Chairman. Alexander Ogrinz. 
Co-Chairman. Victor H. Morgenroth. 
Jr., Dean Noel E. Foss, Gordon Mouat. 
Samuel I. Raichlen. Alvin Rosenthal 
and Frank J. Slama. 

The annual business meeting of the 
Alumni Association of the School of 
Pharmacy was scheduled for May 14. 
1959, in the Kelly Memorial Building. 
Lombard Street. 

The banquet honoring the 1959 
graduating class, together with all class 
reunions, will be held on June 4, 1959 
in the Emerson Hotel. 



College of 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
RECREATION and 
HEALTH 

Dr. Lester M. Fralev 



News of the Staff 
Dr. Dorothy Mohr. Miss Florence 
Clapham and Miss Jean Deyoe are 
serving on the Maryland State Com- 
mittee of the Division of Girl's and 
Women's Sports of the American As- 
sociation for Health. Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation. The attended a 
meeting of this committee on March 7 
at Goucher College. 

Dr. Ellen E. Harvey and Dean L. M. 
Fralev have been serving on the Gen- 
eral Committee of the Governor's Con- 
ference on Recreation. 

Mr. Harold Freeman attended the 
Eastern District Meeting of the Na- 
tional Recreation Society held at Buck 
Hill Falls. Pennsylvania from March 
17 through March 20. 

Dr. Ellen E. Hurvey attended the 
Administrative Council meeting of the 
American Recreation Society held in 
Milwaukee. Wisconsin from April 16 
through April 19. Dr. Harvey is chair- 
man of the Committee on Professional 
Development and Recruitment. 




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Telephone: JUniper 9-7508 



56 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



A 



From the Physicai Therapy 

Depab i MINT 
Dr. Gladys E. Wadsworth, member of 
the facult) ol the i ollege ol Physical 
Education, Recreation and Health and 
Head of the Department of Physical 
Rierapy, served as .1 member of the 
planning committee of an institute on 
Understanding and Skills in Adminis- 
tration — Education for Physical lher- 
apy. The meeting sponsored by the 
American Physical rherapj Associa- 
tion and the Office of Vocational 
Rehabilitation, was held April 13 
through 17. 1959, at the Kellogg 
Center, Michigan State University. East 
I ansing, Michigan. The objectives of 
the institute were: (1) to provide cur- 
rent concepts in the area of administra- 
tion in order to stimulate improvement 
in the skills of supervision, human rela- 
tions, and communications: (2) to ex- 
plore concepts and methods of evalua- 
tion as a means of improving standards 
of physical therapy service, i.e.. patient 
care and student education: (3) to de- 
velop an appreciation and understand- 
ing of the trends in higher education — 
their implication for physical therapy 
education: (4) to stimulate and encour- 
age long range thinking and planning 
in both the preclinical and clinical 
phases of physical therapy education. 
Miss Ruth Latimer. Assistant Educa- 
tional Administrator of the Physical 
Therapy Curriculum, participated as a 
member of a panel discussing Re- 
search — Implications for the Future in 
Physical Therapy Education. 

Wrestling Tournament 
Dr. Warren R. Johnson, as member of 
the Athletic Council, is serving as the 
University's official representative at 
the NCAA Wrestling Coaches confer- 
ence at Iowa City, Iowa. Arrangements 
are being made for the National Wres- 
tling Tournament to be held in the Cole 
Activities Building. University of Mary- 
land in 1960. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

(formerly College of Special and 
Continuation Studies) 



G. Allen Sager 



Armed Forces Education 
Conference 



M, 



ORE THAN 300 DELEGATES FROM 

forty-two states and twelve foreign 
(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE. 1959 



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Hot Water Heat 

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countries attended the third world-wide 
Armed Forces \ ducation Conference, 
sponsored bj the University ol Mary- 
land, in Baltimore. Maryland on Febru- 
ary 19 and 20. 

Keynote speaker for the two-day 
paries was General I. L. Femnitzer. 
U. S. Army Vice ( 'hie! ol Stall, who 
spoke on "The Importance of Educa- 
tion in the Armed Forces." General 
I emnitzer has since heen appointed to 
succeed General Maws ell Taylor as 
U. S. Army Chief of Stair this summer. 

The Conferees, gathered in the Lord 
Baltimore Hotel, were greeted by Dr. 
Wilson H. Elkins, President ol the Uni- 
versity, and the Honorable J. Millard 
I awes, Governor of the State of Mary- 
land. Dr. Elkins stressed the mutual 
stake that educational institutions and 
the Armed Forces have in maintaining 
and extending the basic principles of 
freedom and democracy. Governor 
Tawes greeted the delegates on behalf 
of the people of the State and ex- 
pressed their support for the fine educa- 
tional services the University of Mary- 
land is providing for the Armed Forces. 

Lt. General Dean C. Strother. Deputy 
Chief of Staff of Operations. Head- 
quarters. U. S. Air Force, addressed 
the luncheon convocation of the con- 
vention on the first day. A former 
commander of the Air University at 
Maxwell Air Force Base. Alabama, he 
discussed the topic. "Modern Arms — 
and the Man." 

Dr. Arthur Adams. President of the 
American Council on Education, also 
addressed the Conference on the first 
morning. He dealt on the role of the 
American Council on Education in 
serving and supporting educational 
services for the Armed Forces. He 
emphasized that the member colleges 
and universities of the American Coun- 
cil on Education are committed to the 
close cooperation with the Armed 
Forces in sharing the problems of edu- 
cation. 

At luncheon on the second day of 
the Conference. Dr. Edwin P. Adkins. 
National Coordinator of the American 
Association of Colleges for Teacher 
Education in cooperation with the Na- 
tional Broadcasting Company, presented 
a report on the "Continental Class- 
room." college TV course in atomic 
age physics. His presentation was sup- 
plemented with a film of a typical class- 
room session. He was followed by Dr. 
Charles J. Mclntyre. Chief oi the In- 
structional Procedures and Evaluation 
Branch. Education Division, Office of 
Armed Forces Information and Educa- 
tion, who demonstrated the use of films 
in teaching. 



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A Complete Line of Beverages 

8200 Boltimor* Blvd. College Pork. Md. 



58 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Several representative and informs 
tive panel discussions were held 
throughout the Conference, rhese in- 

Cluded panels on "Education Philos- 
ophies and Needs of the Armed Serv- 
ices," "Distinctive off-dutj Education 

Programs." and "Special Programs for 
Militarv Personnel." 

One of the highlights of the Con- 
ferenee was the panel on teaching 
careers tor retired military personnel, 
chaired by Dr. Thomas C. Pullen. 
Superintendent oi Schools. State o! 
Maryland. Dr. Lloyd E. Blanch. As- 
sistant Commissioner for higher edu- 
cation. U. S. Office of Education, dis- 
cussed teaching careers in the colleges 
and universities. Dr. Ray C. Maul. 
National Education Association, spoke 
on teaching careers in the public 
schools. 



SOCIAL NOTES 



Marriages 

Nursing Alumni: 

Doris Jean Rutherford. '56, to Ensign 

Peter M. Hekman. Jr.. on June 4, 

1956. 

Anne Greves Blauvelt, '58, to 2nd 
Lt. U.S.A. Air Force Joseph Richard 
Wettlin. on December 27. 1958. 

Margaret G. McFarland. '56. to Mr. 
James B. H. LeFever. on September 
6. 1958. 

Sarah Elizabeth Weimer. '46, to Mr. 
William C. Meredith, on March 14, 
1959. 

Barbara Mary Klinedinst. '57, to Mr. 
Stephen L. Kolumban, on June 16, 

1958. Mrs. Kolumban writes, "My hus- 
band is also a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, Class 1957. in the 

1 School of Physical Therapy. At pres- 
I ent we are doing graduate work in 
education at the School of Missions of 
the Chicago Luther Theological Semi- 
nary". She also said their address 
[would be 1605 S. 13th Street. May- 
wood. Illinois, until September 1st, 

1959. After that date it will be Vellare 
Christian Hospital Medical College. 

! Madras Pradish, Vellare, India. 

Births 

i Mr. and Mrs. Ralph A. Bernardo of 
! Battle Creek, Michigan, announce the 
! birth of their second child and first son, 
i Ralph Antonio, on February 13, 1959. 
(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE, 1959 






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3402 Weller Rd., Wheaton, Md. WHitehall 6-3400 



#^ 


BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 


<+ c 


"Secotae 2uaLty Qo^uicionA-" 


' 


PLANT: 621-27 G STREET, N.W. REpubllc 7-S400 




WASHINGTON, D.C. 




BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfield 7-0880 



59 



Serving Wash , Vo and Md. For Over 
o Quarter Century 

PLUMBING 

HEATING 

AND AIR CONDITIONING 

KITCHEN AND BATHROOM 

REMODELING 

GAS WATER HEATERS 

ATCHISON & KELLER 

INC. 
DEPENDABLE— EFFICIENT— FAIR 

TA. 9-8100 

1246 TAYLOR ST. N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Radio Dispatched Trucks 



See and Drive the 1959 Ford 



SALES 



s£w/ 



SERVICE 



PALMER FORD, INC. 

31 10 Hamilton Street 
HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

Phone AP 7-0110 




HEATING WArfield 7-8538 

PLUMBING 

REMODELING 

JOBBING A SPECIALTY 

ROBERT F. HOFF 



6313 - 46th Ave. 



Riverdal*. Md. 



Interestingly enough, the baby was 
bom on his father's birthdav who was 
also born on Friday the 13th. Ralph 
was a member of the 1949 graduating 
class. Arts & Sciences. 

[o Dr. and Mrs. N. Jerome Chapin. 
Dent. s 2. a daughter. Julie Lynn, on 
March 17. 1959 in Baltimore. Mary- 
land. 

To Carole and Walter C'ortese. 
B.P.A. '50. a girl. Lisa Ann. on March 
2. 1959 in Mount Vernon. New York. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Steen G. Wester- 
berg, a daughter. 1 aura Lynn, on Janu- 
ary 4. 1959. Mrs. Westerberg was 
Nancy Smith. Nursing '5X. Mr. Wester- 
berg is an alumnus of the 1958 class. 
College of Agriculture. 

To Mr. and Mrs. James W. Ermlich. 
a daughter. I.esa Gave, on June 17. 
1958. Mrs. Ermlich was Fay Janet 
Kinnamon, Ed. '54. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Earl Clemens, a 
son. Michael Joseph on October 29. 
1958. Mrs. Clemens was Audrev 
Laymon, Nursing '55. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John W. SenifT. a 
son. Dean Clarke, in August. 1958. 
Mrs. SenifT was Martha Smith. Nursing 
'55. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Frederick E. Con- 
nelly, a son, Frederick E.. Jr.. in De- 
cember. 1958. The Connellys also 
have a daughter. Karen, one year old. 
Mrs. Connelly was Nellie Pardew. 
Nursing '55. 

To Captain and Mrs. Michael 
Iacona. son. David Paul, on November 
10. 1958. This the fourth child. Mrs. 
Iacona, was Charlotte Halter, Nursing 
'48. 

To Major and Mrs. A. B. McClin- 
tock, a son. in September. 1958. Mrs. 
McClintock was Phyllis Booth, Nursing 
'52. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Durney, 
a daughter. Joann Marie, on February 
5, 1959. Mrs. Durney was Lillie 
Porter. Nursing '51. The Durneys have 
two sons. led four years old and 
Chuck, three. They say the boys love 
their new sister very much. 

Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Hope, announce 
the birth of their fifth child and second 
son, on June 24. 1958. Name: David 
Danforth Hope. Mrs. Hope was 
Dorothy M. Danforth. Nursing '39. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. B. Lower, a son. 
on May 21. 1958. They have three 
children, one girl and two bovs. Mrs. 
I ower was Carolyn E. Cadle, Nursing 
'5 1. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Carlton Godlove's 
children are as follows: Linda Jean. 
eight years, Martha Dale, four; and 
John Carlton. II. seventeen months. 



^ffnkw<! $ 




Icjuatilii and 



FINE FOOD & DRINKS 
"<< /" U Famous Wine Cellar 

FIFTH AVE. a BRENTWOOD 

DUNDALK, MD. 

2 New Dining Rooms added to serve our 

patrons better. 

Private Banquet facilities to accommodate 

10 to 125 guests. 

For li.servations Cull 

ATwoter 5-0520 • ATwater 4-9854 



USED CARS 
All Makes 

NO BETTER PRICE .. 
ANYWHERE 

Montgomery — Stubbs 

Motors, Inc. 

3715 l>l;n Itn -Inn •- Kd. 

COLMAR MANOR, MD. 



• REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc. 1 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

1612 FOURTEENTH ST.. N.W. 

Complete 

AIR CONDITIONING. REFRIGERATION, 
PARTS AND SUPPLIES 



Serving 

THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. MARYLA 
VIRGINIA AND WEST VIRGINIA 
Member A.R.W. 

HO. 2-2600 

WASHINGTON 9. D. C. 






Over Half Century of Continuous Service 

R. B. PHELPS 
STONE CO. 



CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

Limestone 
Granite Marble 

NOrth 7-1508 2501 Ninth St., N.E. 

Washington 18, D. C. 



Penny O. TVMiHteH 

Class 1928 

Insurance of all Kinds 

UNion 4-1100 

4316 GALLATIN STREET 

Hyattsville. Md. 



60 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



J 



\lis Godlove w.is Marj Eleanor 
£olarusso, Nursing '46. 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin N. Teffeau, a 
daughter, Tami Melinda, on February 

7, 1 1 >> 1 >. Mrs. reffeau was slinks 
Brown feffeau, Nursing '55. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 



DR. HtRBLRT ElCHERT 

Dr. Herbert Eichert. a prominent heart 
specialist of Miami. Florida, was killed 
in an early morning automobile acci- 
dent in a fog on February 2. 1959. 

Dr. Eichert received the Ph.G. 
diploma from the School of Pharmacy 
in 1928. also the B. S. in 1930. and the 
M. D. degree in 1932 from the Medical 
School of the University of Maryland. 
He also did post-graduate work at the 
Union Memorial and the Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital in Baltimore, and in the 
American Hospital in Paris. 

Dr. Eichert was Chief of Staff of the 
National Children's Cardiac Home in 
Miami, and Chief of Staff in Medicine 
at the University of Miami. He was 
also a Diplomate of the American 
Board of Internal Medicine, and a 
Diplomate of the American Board of 
Cardiology. 

Dr. Eichert held a pilot's license for 
his private plane for 15 years; was 
Chairman of the Florida Flying Physi- 
cian's Association and was also a mem- 
ber of the Dade County Sheriff's Patrol. 

He is survived by his wife and a 
17-year-old daughter; a brother Dr. 
Arnold H. Eichert, Superintendent of 
the Florida Mental State Hospital, 
Hollywood, Florida, a graduate of 
pharmacy and medicine of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland; and a sister, Mrs. 
Vernon L. Piel of Baltimore, Md. 

George P. Trax 
George P. Trax, Eng. '13, died recently 
at his home. Mr. Trax retired from 
engineering work about a year ago and 
was living in New York. 

William P. Roberts 
William Pinkney Roberts, Eng. '03, 
died recently at Kensington Gardens 
Sanitarium after a long illness. His 
home was at 10103 McKenney Ave- 
nue. Silver Spring. 

Mr. Roberts had retired last year 
from the Southern Oxygen Company, 
a firm he had worked for during the 

(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE. 1959 



J.H.DeVEAU&SON.Inc. 



General Contractors 



ROADS 




EXCAVATION 


DRIVEWAYS 




BUILDINGS 


PIPE 




CONCRETE 




CONCRETE 


SAWS 



4100 Jones Bridge Road 

North Chevy Chase, Md 



RAY GAINS STEEL CO. 



SPECIALIZING IN 

REINFORCING 

STEEL 

PLACING 

1617 R St. S. E. LU 4-1855 

Washington, D. C. 



WALLOP and SON 



J. DOUGLASS WALLOP, JR. 
Class of 1919 



J. DOUGLASS WALLOP, 3rd 
Class of 1942 



— INSURANCE — 

Fire - Automobile - Life - Accident • Liability - Bonds 

EVERY INSURANCE SERVICE — COUNTRY WIDE 

1101 VERMONT AVE., N.W.— Suite 405 Executive 3-1400 WASHINGTON 5, D. C. 



Thomas E. Claris line* 

PlandU+Uf. and eMeatituf, S&wice 
4434 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Washington, D. C. 
WOodley 6-7122 Day or Night, WOodley 6-5181 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 

The "Handy" Line 

Baltimore, Md. 



SEALTEST FOODS: 

Division of 

National Dairy Products Corp. 

For the "Best" in Dairy Products 

Buy Sealtest 

ADams 2-1011 



61 



"SAY BOSS" 

It i Pride that makes the Difference 

m Any Business 

Clean, neal, safely dressed workers 

HAVE FEWER JOB ACCIDENTS 

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BOOST MORALE 

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— With Complete Laundry Service Can 

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2806 WILKENS AVE. 
BALTIMORE 23, MD. 
For A Cleaner Baltimore — 

Ask About KEX Dust Control?? 




SALES 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

Near University of Maryland 

WArfield 7-1010 & 7-0321 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE, MD. 



NORTH WASHINGTON 
PRESS 

Inc. 

We Specialize in Printing 
for Churches and Schools 

849 Upshur St., N. W. 

WASHINGTON 11 , D. C. 

TAylor 9-3932 



G. B. MACKE CORP. 

Serving Maryland University 
with all types of 
Vending Machines 



RESTORFF MOTORS 



Sales 



A/cuA 



Service 



7323 BALTIMORE BLVD. • AP 7-5100 
COLLEGE PARK. MD. 



previous six yean. Formerly, he was 

employed for more than 30 sears with 
the Air Reduction Sales Company. He 
spent much ol his career with it as 
District Manager in Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

Surviving him are his wife, a son. a 
daughter, three brothers, and three 
sisters. 

Joseph M. Vial 

Joseph M. Vial. 69. a retired member 
of the C ollege of Agriculture and a 
former manager of the Eastern Na- 
tional Livestock Exposition in Balti- 
more, died of a heart attack on Febru- 
arj 24 at his home in University Park. 

Mr. Vial served 20 years with the 
Agricultural Extension Service as the 
authority on horses. After retirement 
in July, 1954, he managed the Eastern 
National Livestock Exposition for 
several years. 

Draft horses interested him more 
than anything else in his field. Before 
coming to the University of Maryland, 
he raised a Percheron mare that was 
grand champion at the Chicago Inter- 
national Livestock Exposition. On sev- 
eral occasions he was the judge of draft 
horses at that exposition and in 1936 a 
group of farmers sent him to Belgium 
and France to purchase horses for 
them. 

In January of this year he was 
selected as an Honorary Fellow in the 
American Society of Animal Produc- 
tion. 

Nursing Alumnae 

Milton. Louise Duncan. '00. on Janu- 
ary 6, 1958. 

Daniel. Frances Byrd. "01. in 1958. 

Barber. Jennie Dean. "07. on Janu- 
ary 1. 1958. 

Bay, Grace Irene, (Mrs. Alexander 
Y. Watters) '07. on October 6, 1958. 

Barrett. Adele Davis (Mrs. William 
Parramore '10. on October 24. 1958. 

Fisher, Mary Elizabeth (Mrs. 
Charles F. Fay) '24, in September, 
1958. 

John C. Osborne 

On Wednesday. December 10. 1958. 
John C. Osborne succumbed to a heart 
ailment at the age of 42. 

Dr. Osborne started his education at 
( alverl Hall and Loyola College and 
prepared for his medical profession at 
the Universin of Maryland School of 
Medicine, where he was graduated in 
1942. 

Alter a year as an intern and during 
his residenC] in Medicine at Mercy. Dr. 
Osborne was ordered to active duty in 
the Army. During his militan service 



Thomas & Thompson Co. 

Established 1872 

The Downtown 
Prescription Drug Store 

Hove Your Prescriptions 
Carefully Compounded by 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

at Baltimore and Light Sts. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

— Delivery Service — 

TELEPHONE 

SAratoga 7-2960 



•EVERYTHING IN MILLWORK" 

STOCK & SPECIAL 

For Builders and Home Owners 



DOORS 


MANTELS 


SASH 


FRONT ENTRANCES 


FRAMES 


SLIDING DOOR UNITS 


BLINDS 


DISAPPEARING STAIRWAYS 


PLYWOOD 


KITCHEN CABINETS 


MOULDINGS 


STAIR MATERIAL 


PANELING 


CORNER CABINETS 



LAMAR & WALLACE 

37 New York Avenue. N.E. ME 8-4126 

Washington 2, D. C. 



SOUTHEAST TITLE CORP. 1 



Chas. T. Clayton. President 
40 Years Experience 
COMPLETE SERVICE 

Washington. D. C. & Maryland 

Settlements - Escrows 

Hi <il Estate Examinations 

and Title Insurance 
1343 Good Hope Rd.. S.E. 
LUdlow 1-3200 Washington, D. 



I 



NOW OPEN FOR LUNCHEONS 



v CHARCOAL' 

ft'OUStl) 



<=*&?;« 



2637 Conn. Ave. N.W.. Washington, D. C. 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



62 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Dr. Osborne commanded an ambulance 
evacuation unit which participated in 

Ihc battle of New Guinea, the invasion 

ol the Philippines and the occupation 
of Japan. 1 or his role in the Philippine 

campaign. Dr. Osborne, then a Major, 
w.h awarded the Bronze Star. 

Following his separation from the 
Army. Dr. Osborne and his wile, the 
former Frances Martin, returned to the 
Hamilton section of Baltimore where 
Dr. Osborne lived since his boyhood. 
Pursuing the general practice of medi- 
cine. Dr. Osborne soon was engrossed 
with the well-being of his community. 
Besides being recognized for his pro- 
fessional skill. Dr. Osborne was one of 
the most popular men in his profession. 
His death has prompted an amazing 
number of calls and letters from people 
who wished to express their apprecia- 
tion for some kindness they had re- 
ceived as patients or friends. He will 
always be remembered by his patients 
and associates for his deep faith and 
chantv 

Everyone at Mercy joins in extend- 
ing heartfelt sympathy to Dr. Osborne's 
parents, wife and children. 

— from the Mercy Hospital 
(Baltimore) Scope 

Carl R. Ahroon, Jr. 

Carl R. Ahroon, Jr., a Bloomington, 
Illinois, physician for 23 years died on 
August 30, 1958 following a heart 
attack which occurred on August 18th. 
A native of Baltimore, he received 
his B.A. degree from the Johns Hopkins 
University in 1928, graduating from the 
University of Maryland School of Med- 
icine in 1932. Following an internship 
and assistant residency at the University 
Hospital, he conducted general practice 
for a while at Ellicott City, Md., mov- 
ing from there to Bloomington. During 
World War II he served as a Com- 
mander in the Medical Corps, U. S. 
Navy. He was a member of the 
A.M.A.. the Illinois State and the Mac- 
Lean County Medical Societies, and the 
American College of Allergists, the 
American and Illinois Heart Associa- 
tions, the American Pneumismatic As- 
sociation, the College Alumni Associa- 
tion, the Rotary Club, the American 
Legion, and the Bloomington Country 
Club. 

Donald L. Hoover 

Lt. Donald L. Hoover, Ag. '55 (Agri- 
cultural Economics), was killed April 
8 in a jet accident. His cockpit heat 
controls became jammed over the At- 
lantic Ocean on a flight in an F-100-D 
jet flying from Louisiana to Africa. 



(?l*44 a£ '59 



. . . an you take 


your 


places in your < 


mil in II ii it n 


and throughout 


III, 


lit ml. We sincr 


■ely 


lli.ill noil all . . 




and 




happiness 




t mill n anil 




in the 




iliurs 




ahead. 





JOHN M. WALTON 
DENNIS W. MADDEN 

3510 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE 
MT. RAINIER. MD. 






Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 

6-8400 


Producers and Distributors of 
WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

RE 
6-7100 








WASHINGTON 20, D.C. 







JUniper 9-4580 JUniper 9-3340 

A. MYRON COWELL, Inc. 

MASONRY-CONTRACTORS 

8416 Ramsey Ave. Silver Spring, Md. 



24 -HOUR TOWING SERVICE 



WArfield 7-9710 



7505 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



MAY-JUNE. 1959 



63 



Directory of Advertisers 



411 

I s Adkini 42 

iving c ompan) 

.11 ting < mpi 
1 Hsinfcctant < ompan) 
American I. telegraph Compan) 

Inside Back ( ovei 

Anchoi Pom Producu (Anctaoi Fenct 

\ I > \ iuK 1 -.. n 12 

Arnold '1 Village Shop JO 

\iuiuki 1 ederal , lacion 54 

Isphali Service ( ompan) 54 

Atcnicoti a Keller, In, . 60 

Alvin I \iihinoc. Inc. Outside B 



Baltimore Asphalt Block a rile Compan) 
Baltimore Business I onus 

Baltimore I nvelope c ompan] 

Baltimore roro Compan) 

Bank ..i Bethesda 

H.ink Ol C rishcld 

Bard-Avon School 

1 1 Benson Furniture Company 

Bergmann's 1 aundr) 

Bethesdan Motor Motel 

Bethesd.i Cinder Block Manufacturing Com- 
pan) 

Bio R.imo Drug Company 

Blackie's House ol Beet 

Bon Ion Saratoga Chip Distributors 

W illiam r. Booth 

Harr) A. Boawell Compan) 

Brentwood Inn 

Briggs Construction Company, Inc 

Briggs Meat Product Compan) ... 

Dexter I Bryan 

Buck class ( ompan) 



Carlea Janitoi Supply Compan) 

c arpet Center ; 

Thomas I Carroll a Son 

Casual Catering Sen ice 

D Harry Chambers. Opticians 

Chane) 's Garage 

Citizens National Bank 

Thomas I (lark. Inc 

Cloverland Farms Dairj 

Conn A Bock Company 

Coleman A Wood. Inc 

C olson Mcrriam Company 

Elizabeth Coone) Personnel Agency 

Cooperative Dental laboratory .... 
Count> Title Company 

\ Myron c owell, Inc 

George Bert Cropper 

c roasc a Blackwell Compan) 

Crown Oil A Wax Company 

Crust) Pie Compan) 

N ictOI ( UShwa A Sons 



DAI Sieel Corporation 

Davidson transfer A Storage Company 
F. A. Davis A Sons 

I) ( ignition Headquarters, Inc 
Del-Haven White House Motel 
J II DeVeau a Sons, In, 

Dietrich a Gambrill, Inc 

Douglas Aircraft c ompan) Inc 
Drummond A ( ompany, Inc 



S m 
n Overall c ompan) 
Edmonds Optician 
I lectronic w holesalers, In, 
I mbaas) ( amera Center 

») D.ur\ 
rdl 



57 

55 

■ 

35 

45 
44 
31 
59 
39 

60 

27 
4X 
49 
43 

36 
60 
56 
34 
59 
26 



56 
49 
40 
51 
27 
6.1 
43 
61 
24 
43 
37 
54 
57 
29 
51 
63 
43 
31 
44 
40 
30 



32 
53 

; - 
(-1 
44 
26 



44 
62 

37 
47 
M 
25 
46 



I abricator's Steel c oip 58 

1 aimers < oop era tive Association 44 

J H. Filbert. In, . 38 

I nst Federal Savings a 1 o.in Association 

I 11st National Bank ol Baltimore S 

n Motors, Ltd .....55 

Fratemit) Federal Savings A I o.,n An 

tion 

I icdenck l nderwriters, in, 44 

I ullcr a d'Albert, In, . 46 

Raj Gaines Steel C ompany 61 

Garamond Press 47 

S \ ( i. ,111 ,\ S,>n. In, 

Albert I GoetZC Packing Company 54 

Gray Concrete Pipe Company 62 

i I < iretnei < ompan) 

M J Grove Lime Compan) 44 

Die Handv line I Haul M. Adams) .61 

Hannes Formal Wear 55 

Harrington Hotel 40 

Harrison Hall Hotel 41 

Harvey Dair>. Inc 30 

Hcndler's Ice Cream Company 52 

Hills ard Sales Company 40 

Hinde & Dauch 33 

Hut's Electrical Service, In, 

Robert I . Hofl 60 

Hotel Dupont Plaza Outside Back Cover 

1 he Industrial Corporation 33 

In Town Motor Hotels, 59 

Johannes & Murray 34 

Johnston, Lemon & Company 39 

The Frances Scott Key Hotel 44 

Kidwell & Kidwell. Inc 52 

King Brothers. Inc. Printing 31 

The E. H. Koester Bakery Company 32 

Koontz Creamery . Inc 59 

Lamar A Wallace 62 

Lankford Hotel 41 

Ledo Restaurant 47 

Lord Calvert Hotel 52 

1 ustine-Nicholson Chevrolet 36 

G. B. Mackc Corporation 62 

M & G Armature & Generator Service, Inc. 55 

Mangels. Herold Company. Inc 5(1 

Marenka Metal Manufacturing Company ... 37 

Maria's Restaurant 26 

Martin's 48 

Maryland Hotel Supply Company 52 

Mary land Inn 29 

Maryland Trust Company ...Inside Front Covet 

Mason Canning Compan] 45 

Mayoi A City Council of Ocean City 41 

Meadowgold Ice Cream Company 57 

Metropolitan Tourist Company 53 

F. O. Mitchell A Bro.. Inc 44 

Modern Machinist Company 58 

Modern Stationery Company 27 

Montgomery-Stubbs Motors. Inc 60 

Moses-Ecco Company. Inc 39 

Murray-Baumgartner Company 51 

Murra) Hardware Compan) 56 

John J A I Rowland McCnnily 2" 

Mcleod A Romborg Stone Company, Inc. 15 

M( Neill Surveys, Inc . 56 

National Bank ot Cambridge 42 

National Dam Products Corporation 61 

National Equipment A Supply Compan> 47 

Norman MotOI C 'ompany 39 

Normandy I arms . ... 54 

North Washington Press. In,. 62 

Northrop Aircraft, Inc. 



Occidental Restaurant 

Old New Orleans Restaurant 

Olncy Inn 

Ottenberg's Bakers. In, 



Palmer Ford. Inc 

Park Transler Company 

Paving Supply A I quipment Company 
Peninsula Poultry Distributors. In, 

Pcnn Hotel (Bernie Lee's) 

Perpetual Building Association 
l< B Phelps Stone Company 

Pioneer Refrigeration Company 

Jimmie Porter iT A Kiernans) 

James Post ales 



46 
36 

48 

60 

46 

34 

53 

56 

58 

60 

531 

58 

52 



(Juick Service Laundry .58 



Refrigeration Supply Company 

Restaurant S23 

Restortf Motors 

Rex Engraving Compan • 

Riall Jackson Company 

Ridgeville Nurseries 

Rocco's Charcoal House 

Roche A Hull. Inc 

Roma Restaurant 

• (terminator Company . 



Safeway Trailways 

Salisbury Milling Company 

Salisbury Rug Company 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Company 

Seaside Motel 

Seidenspinner. Realtor 

The Shade Shop 

George C. Shaffer. Inc 

Shore Distributors 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Company 

A. W . Sisk & Company 

Russell W'. Smith 

Smith's Book Store 

Southcomb. Inc 

Southeastern Floor Company 

Southeast Title Corporation 

Southern Oxygen Company 

Southern Plate Glass Company 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 

Standard Duplicating Company 

Standard Pontine 

Star Baking Company 

Sterling Process ( Bookbinders) 

Stray er College 

Students Supply Store 

Suburban Trust Company 

Sweetheart Bakers 



Taylor House 

Thomas & Thompson Company 

Thompson Furniture Company 

Thomsson Steel Company 

Tide's Inn 

Tow n Hall Tax em 

Town Reinforcing Concrete Construction ' o 
Inc 

Universal Electro Plating Company 



James T. Vernay A Sons Company 
R. L. Voight A Son. Inc 



W allop & Son. Insurance 

Walton A Madden 

George Washington Hotel 

W ashington W hole-sale Drug Exchange. Inc. 

J. I. Wells Company. Inc 

w estinghouse Electric Corp 

Wholesale Radio Parts Company. Inc 

Perry O. Wilkinson 

Carl J. Williams A Sons 

I M, Kenny Willis 

W R. W inslow Company 

W orcester Fertilizer Company 

W v e Plantation 



s. enching Palace 



60 
37 
62 
29 
31 
51 
62 
56 
32 
33 

28 
45 
50 
38 
32 
41 
62 
49 
49 
42 
63 
42 
27 
48 
48 
25 
62 
35 
57 
42 
40 
34 
45 
36 
38 
30 
46 

42 

52 
62 
49 

29 

40 
61 

41 
60 

27 

60 

43 
45 

45 



64 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Dej ^e^j 



The telephone is a defense weapon 
— anil an important one. 

A manufacturer of rockets, for ex- 
ample, needs data or delivery on a 
specific part. lie picks up his tele- 
phone, makes several Long Distance 
calls, and his problem is solved. 

\n unidentified aircraft is detected 
in flight by a radar installation. The 
information is relaxed automatically 
and instantly over telephone cables 
to a defense center. 

It is then flashed over the network 
of special Bell System telephone 
lines which link the country's entire 
system of continental defense. 

The role of the Bell System docs 
not stop there or with the thousands 
upon thousands of calls that arc a 
part of the manufacture of countless 
items of defense. 

Its Bell Telephone Laboratories arc 
._vd in many important research 
and development projects for the 
government. These include the Nike 
Zeus anti-missile missile system and 
the guidance system for the Titan 



intercontinental ballistic missile. 

Western Electric, the Bell Sys- 
tem's manufacturing and supply 
unit, is producing the guidance and 
control equipment which is the hearl 
and brains of the mighty Nike Aj.i\ 
and Nike Hercules missile systems. 

The Sandia Corporation, a subsid- 
iary of Western Electric, continues 
to manage the Atomic Energy Com- 
mission's Sandia Laboratory, which 
develops, designs and tests atomic 
weapons. 

Among many other Western Elec- 
tric defense projects were the sOOO- 
mile Distant Larlv Warning ( DEW) 
Line in the Arctic and the 'AYhitc 
Alice"' communication system link- 
ing population centers and military 
installations in Alaska. Both were 
completed on schedule and turned 
over to the Air Force. 

Another project for the Air Force 
was the design, production and 
supervision of installation of a com- 
munications system for a guided mis- 
sile test range extending out to sea. 



I he ba< kbone ol this system is the 
special underseas cable tli.it stret< lies 
I 370 nautical miles from Cape ( 
naveral in Florida to Puerto Rico. It 
provides an instant, secret, weather- 
proof means of transmitting data on 

missiles in flight. 

Radar installations along the vvav 
spol the missile's flight position 
which is flashed continuously to the 
testing base by cable. So arc signals 
from the missile itself. 

Recently the U. S. Air Force asked 
us to add the communications phases 
of a ballistic missile early warning 
system to the other military projects 
handled by the Bell System. 

The Bell System is primarily en- 
gaged in providing telephone serv- 
ice. But it gives top priority and its 
utmost effort to the needs of Govern- 
ment whenever it is called upon for 
work for which it is specially fitted 
by size and experience. 

Particularly when it comes to pro- 
tecting the country, it's good to use 
the best scientific knowledge avail- 
able in the communications field. 

BELL 

TELEPHONE 

SYSTEM 




WASHINGTON'S NEWEST, MOST MODERN HOTEL 




HOTEL DUPONT PLAZA 

COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 

Meeting and Banquet Facilities 



DUPONT CIRCLE 
Alvin L. Aubinoe, Pres. 



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John J. Cost, Gen. Mgr. 



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Build 



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1515 19th Street, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Phone : 
HUdson 3-6025 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



i l 1; i j_;; vx\ nr 




Volume XXX • Number 5 July-August • 1959 



Dateline: Commencement 1959 • The Campus Revisited • The May Day That Blew Away! 



Speaking of Progress - - - 




Progress sp<aks for itsdf. 
57,000 members can't be wrong! 







The 

NEW 

SITE 

For 

SAVERS 



Dividends compounded and paid quarterly 



TIieI 



RSTlJEDERAL 

INWASHINGTON 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN 
ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 

Bethesda Branch: 8216 Wisconsin Avenue 
OL. 6-3923 



— Home Office — 

610 13th Street, N.W. Washington 5, D. C. 

Dl. 7-2370 



IV1;» >\ I. u .< 1 




The Cover j ["his photograph w.is taken from the rool ol the Preai n<>\ 
m Its iii Stadium .is candidates foi degrees waited i>> march in i>> the 
Commencement Exercises, rhe time was approximate!) 9 a.m., the weathei 
balm) with .1 hinl ol impending thundershowers which nevei materialized 
Photographed In George A ( ampbell, I niversit) stafl photographei a frequent 
contributor to The Maryland Magazine More ol Mr. ( ampbell's photographs 
can be found in the Commencement and Alumni Reunions articles, 



the 




magazine 

Volume XXX 



Number 5 



JULY ALKiUST • 1959 



Alumni Publication of 

the University of Maryland 

BO*RD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
ENOS S. STOCKBRIDGE, Assistant Treasurer 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

C. EWING TUTTLE 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 






DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 

OFFICE OF U NIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY. Director 

ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER. Staff Photographer 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
FRANK BLOCK. '24. Presidont 
HARRY A. BOSWELL JR., '42, Vice-President 
MRS. GERALDINE P. EDWARDS, '31, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, "38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 

OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



OF FICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 
Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

HO 7-9018- FE 7-2113 



In This Issue 




FEATURES 




2 


The Alumni Diary 


3 


Alumni and Campus Notes 


6 


Dateline: Commencement 1959 


14 


The Campus Revisited 


21 


The May Day that Blew Away! 


23 


Dr. Goldstein is Cited as "Distinguished Alumnus' 


24 


1,500 Alumni Establish a Reunion Record 


27 


University Sports 


NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 




30 


Agriculture 


31 


Arts and Sciences 




41 


Business and Public Administration 




43 


Dentistry 


PRESIDENT ELKINS 1 


45 


Education 


REPORT TO THE 
. JUNE 18 MEETING 


48 
51 
53 


Engineering 
Home Economics 
Medicine 


of the Board of Regents 


57 


Nursing 


concerning the 


58 


Pharmacy 


State of the University 
will be carried in the 
EPTEMBER-OCTOBER ISSUE 


61 
62 


University College 


Completed Careers 




of 


64 


Directory of Advertisers 


THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






* * * 







Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md.. as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 



I HI (il Nl RA1 Al i MM CO\ N< II 

s( iiiioi \ND COLLEGl 
hi fHI si \ / 1//1 / s 
i . i i > i 

Vrthui B Hamilton, 79 
( layton Reynolds, '22 
lore I Bissell, 2(1 

kRTIAICIBNCBl 

w Gilbert Dent, Jr., '26 
Ralph (i Shure. '32 
( harles R Merrick, '26 

IUSINEfl4 f i h I I c kDMIHISTBATION 

Harrj v Boswell, Ji . '42 
\hin s Klein : " 
I gberl I I ingle) 27 

DENTISTB1 

Df Samuel Bryant, '32 
Di Eugene I) I yon, '38 
I), Edwin (. Gail, '18 

I I. I I IIHIV 

\li-< John J Hoyert, Jr . '50 
Judson Bell. '41 
Ham Hasslinger, ;; 

BNGINBBBING 

Emmett l oane, '29 
Robert M. Rivello, '43 
Arthur G. VanReuth, '34 

MOM I BCONOMIC1 

Mis Miriam Bcall. '3 I 

Mrs Geraldine P. Edwards. '31 

Mis Agnes McNutt-Kricker, "31 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Benjamin B. Rosenstock, 25 

I as man J Redden. '34 

MIDI! I V I 

Dr. rhurston R. Adams. '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 

Dr. William H. Triplet!. 11 

N I USING 

Mrs Evelyn Koontz Musavi, '53 

Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, '50 
Mrs. Norma Fuller Yeager. '48 

PHAIMAI > 

Frank Block. '24 
Norman J. Levin. '38 
Gordon Mouat, '37 



1/ ( \l\l ( I l H REPRtSI VTATIVES 
Baltimore — (harles F Fllinger. '37 
( arroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence 1 . I eggett, '30 
Cumberland — H. Reford Aldridge. '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
Frederick County — 

James F. Zimmerman. '37 
M" Club — George knepley. '39 
New Enuland — Georee Kerlejza, '25 
New York- Harold McGay, "50 
Overseas— Col. Edward J. Fletcher. '37 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph r inegold. '34 
Pnnce Georges— Thomas R. Brooks. '36 
Richmond Paul Mullinix, '36 
Schenectady Mrs Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James \V Stevens, '19 
i S Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, "26 



i \ <>i i u 10 W/ \IHl Hs 
Dr Wilson H I Ikins 

President of tin I 'niversity 
David I Brigham 

s, i retary-1 reasurer 
Victor Holm '57, Ivw Secretary 
Joseph H Deckman. '31. I\i\t President 
I (nlbert Prendergast. '33, /'</w President 
I Homer Remsberg. '18, fast President 
Col o H s. umders. |o. Past President 
Dr Mbert E. Goldstein. 12 

Past President 
1 I Speer. 'I 7 . Past Presidt >u 
I \ Koons, '29, Past /''< rident 
Dr \ithur I Bell. '19. Past President 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



1)1 \K I I I I OS\ Al I MM : 

ON( I there was a diamond . . . But. 1 am ahead ol m> story. It all began 
on a hot summer das sshen someone asked a question. What do I 
tor my alumni membership, anyway?" 

The diamond did not come to mind until later. The immediate reaction s, as one 
ot slight agitation which later mellossed with concern. There are so many alumni 
with loyalty, appreciation and genuine interest. Hoss can there be those who are 
apparently more concerned about material dividends from a small investment? 
Where is the disiding line between what others have done for you and what you 
hase done through sour os\n efforts? Does a membership mean a responsibility to 
gise others opportunities sshich have been sours, or does it mean there must be 
a definite return sshich is concrete and visible? 

Perhaps the sparkle of the diamond made it possible for us to control and 
conceal the initial inner reaction to the question. "What do I get for my member- 
ship?" The parade o\ successful alumni activities of past sseeks softened the 
flush of irritation and brought a satisfying glow of confidence. Why not tell of 
these events as viewed by the alumni traveler before talking about the diamond? 

There ssas first the most successful Spring Reunion ever held on the College 
Park campus. The Lasv Alumni Banquet set the pace for equally fine Dental. 
Medical. Nursing and Pharmacy functions. Class reunions honored older grad- 
uates, while twelve Alumni Presidents enthusiastically welcomed nearly 2.700 new 
graduates to alumni circles in Commencement ceremonies before a gathering of 
over tsselse thousand. Quietly meshed within the framework of alumni participa- 
tion were continuing club activities and the contribution of additional funds to 
enhance the prestige of the University and to provide deserving young people a 
future which was otherss ise beyond their reach. 

Often those who have had similar experience fail to have identical reactions. 
Alumni effort means volunteer service and calls for some sacrifice on the part of 
the alumnus. Time has proved we generally give a little before sve receive. 

Sufficient time has passed to eliminate the mild shock of a question which is 
routine and sshich should no longer create a stir. Things which are deeply felt, 
however, call for a collecting of thoughts prior to impulsive action. Perhaps the 
stage is noss set for the diamond story . . . 

Some years ago an African slase-woman labored at her daily task in a diamond 
mine. It was her fortune to come upon one of the largest and most valuable of all 
diamonds knossn to mankind. Her discos cry was recognized by the mine operator 
who gave her both her freedom and a small pension for life. The operator then 
sold this diamond to an experienced trader for SI 5.000. The trader kness the 
markets of the ssorld and in turn sold the diamond for SI 50.000. Surely each 
satisfied with the transaction initiated by the simple hands of an uneducated s 
One can only guess that the profit was appreciated most by the one svho received 
the least, but who gained her freedom. 

There is a possibility that the diamond story has a moral for the alumnus ssho 
asks. 'What do I get for my alumni membership' 1 ". Perhaps it might be turned 
to read. 'What can my membership do for the Alumni Association, the Lnisersits 
ot Maryland, fellow alumni and alumni of the future?". This is a question to 
which sse turn our future attention. We trust many like you will bend their abili- 
ties to help uncoser the anssser Together sse turn up a diamond. 

As ever, 



Ad 



V**—. 



David L. Brigham 

Alumni Secretarx 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 


JULY 




AUGUST 


20-31 


Cosmetology II Institute- — Col- 


3-8 State 4-H Club Week -College 




lege Park campus. 


Park campus. 


20-3 1 


Maryland Traffic Institute — Stu- 






dent Union Building. College 


SEPTEMBER 




Park campus. 




27-3 I 


Cosmetology III Institute. 


8-11 Firemen"s Short Course. 


31 


Summer Session ends — College 


14-18 Registration for the fall semester 




Park campus. 


—College Park campus. 
21 Instruction begins — College Park 
campus. 



McCORMICK Rl •( I ivi s l*l<l SENTATION 

Mr. Charles P. McCormick. Chairman 
of the Board of Regents, and past 
Chairman of the Advisory Council on 
Naval Affairs, was the recipient recently 
of a special presentation of the Balti- 
more Council of the Navy League. I re- 
presentation was made hy Leonard A. 
A. Siems. President of the Baltimore 
Council, at a dinner meeting at the 
Maryland Club. 



■I 




Faculty Members Promoted 

The Board of Regents has approved 
the promotion of 46 University faculty 
members upon the recommendation of 
President Wilson H. Elkins. 

Promoted from Associate Professor 
to Professor were: Robert W. Krauss. 
D. T. Morgan, Jr., College of Agri- 
culture; Richard H. Bauer. Richard 
Ferrell, Bruce Melvin. S. Fred Singer. 
Warren L. Strausbaugh, College of Arts 
and Sciences; Daniel Hamberg, College 
of Business and Public Administration: 
Glenn O. Blough, College of Education: 
Dick Duffey, College of Engineering: 
Wilbur O. Ramsey, School of Dentistry: 
A. H. Finkelstein, Jenny Waelder-Hall. 
Reginald S. Lourie and Samuel Revell. 
School of Medicine. 



as a relief from the usual Military Day 
photographs, our photographer snapped 
this decidedly un-military picture immedi- 
ately following the general order to 
dismiss. 



July-August, 1959 



rhose promoted from Assistant Pro- 
to Associate Professor were 
Paul M Galbreath, John Harrv Hoyert, 
Benjamin I Rodgers, Wayne ( 
Rohrer, Robert ( Wiley, College ol 
lohn c Brace, v James 
Haley, Howard Laster, William Mac- 
Donald Marguerite Rand, Leonora ( 
Rosenfield, w I Schlaretzki, Joseph 
I Vanderslice, College ol Arts and 
Sciences; Guj B. Halhorn. Arthur 
Karinen, ( ollege ol Business and Public 
Administration; Lucille Bowie, College 
ol 1 ducation; I ranees I Reed. Cecilia 
\l /iikus. School ol Nursing; John M 
Brumbaugh, School ol Law; and 
Ihom.is Connor, R. Adams Cowley, 
Henricus Kuypers, rheodore Leveque, 
Fred McCrumb, Robert I Parker. 
1 con. iid Schcrlis. Robert Schultz. Mer- 
rill J. Snyder, ( arroll I , Spurting, Mat- 
thew rayback and John Cj. Wiswell, 
School ol Medicine. 



Guggenheim Fellowships Awarded 

Mar l in. Mi krii i 

Dr Monroe Harmsh Martin. Professor 

ol Mathematics, and Director of the 
Institute ol Fluid Dynamics and Ap- 
plied Mathematics, and Dr. Horace 
Samuel Merrill. Professor ol Historv. 
are among the 321 scholars and artists 
to be awarded fellowships recently bv 
the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial 
Foundation. According to a statement 
released bv the Foundation: "The 
Foundation's Fellowships are granted 





kl > EXCHANGE. It's a new red and white station wagon for Alumni Secretary Dave 
Brighton OS a result of unanimous action by the Alumni Council. The presentation is 
made by President Frank Block under the watchful eye of Abe Goltwals who engi- 
neered the transaction for the Alumni Association. 






to persons of the highest capacity for 
scholarly research, demonstrated bv the 
previous publication of contributions to 
knowledge, and to persons of unusual 
and proven creative ability in the fine 
arts." 

Dr. Martin will use his Fellowship to 
conduct studies on the uniqueness of 
solutions to linear and non-linear 
boundary problems for partial differ- 
ential equations. His professional aflili- 




Pr Martin 

awarded Guggenheim fellow -hips 



Dr. Merrill 



ations include membership in the Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences and the 
American Mathematics Society. He has 
published more than 34 articles. Dr. 
Martin is listed in American Men of 
Science and Who's Who in America. 

Dr. Merrill will study the nature and 
role of American political conservatives 
and conservatism. 1896-1912. He - 
the author of a recent biography of 
Grover Cleveland and of Bourbon 
Democracy of the Middle West. He i- 
a member of the American Historical 
Association, the Mississippi \ alley His- 
torical Association and the American 
Studies Association, among others. 

The Trustees of the Foundation are 
Mrs. Simon Guggenheim. President. 
John C. Emison. Medley G. B Whelp- 
lev. Charles Merz. Roswell Magill. El- 
liott V. Bell. Dale E. Sharp. Forrest C. 
Hamrick. Ernest M. Lundell. Jr.. and 
Henry Allen Moe. 

The Committee of Selection for these 
awards consisted oi Dr. George W 
Corner. Historian of the Rockefeller 
Institute. New York City: Dr. Henri 
M. Peyre, Professor oi French in 
University: Dr. Carl O. Sauer. retired 
Professor oi Geography in the Iniver- 
sitv of California: Dr. Edwin Bidwell 
Wilson, retired Professor oi Vital Sta- 
tistics m the Harvard University School 
of Public Health: and Dr. Louis Booker 
W right. Director oi the Folger Shake- 
speare Library, Washington. D. c 
C hairman. 



rHE Maryland Magazim 



Congressional Dinner 

James M. Swartz '17, furrier, leading 
business man and civic leader of 
Baltimore City, served as Chairman ol 
.1 committee of more than 200 for a 
Congressional Appreciation Dinner 
held in Baltimore on June 7. Honored 
guests were Congressmen George H. 
Fallon. Edward A. Garmatz and 
Samuel N. Friedel. Speaker for the 
occasion was United States Senator 
Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas. Senator 
Johnson is majority leader of the 
Senate. 

[bastmaster for one of the most 
outstanding events ever held in Balti- 
more was Judge Charles E. Moylan a 
1924 graduate of the School of Law. 
The guest speaker was introduced by 
His Excellency, J. Millard Tawes, 
Governor . 



Dr. Burgkrs Elected to 
American Academy 

Dr. Johannes Martinus Burgers, Re- 
search Professor in the Institute of 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics, was recently elected a Fellow 
of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences. He is among the 113 newly- 
elected Fellows from 19 states, a list 
which includes such notables as Herbert 
Lawrence Block (Herblock) of the 
Washington Post. Ben Shahn, Gian 
Carlo Menotti, David Rockefeller, and 



Albert Camus (honorar) membei from 
France), Dr, Burgers was chosen foi 
his work m the engineering sciences 
and technologies Membership in the 
\c.uiem\ now numbers around I 100 
Fellows, 70 Fellows Emeriti, and 160 
Foreign Honorary Members 

I III Vl< DOR I Kl NKII I I I I \ ISKIN 
\\\ \KI) 

A Columbia University cok.\\ lias been 

named winner of the $500 VictOl 

Frenkil relevision Award annual!) 
sponsored bj the University ol Mary- 
land. 

Miss Frances Canavan Mortenghi's 
hour-long television scripl was selected 
b) a board of judges made up of Mary- 
land Speech and Drama Department 
faculty and representatives of WJZ. 
WMAR and WBAL radio and tele- 
vision stations in Baltimore. Miss 
Morenghi was one of twenty entrants 
in the contest. The award is supple- 
mented by Victor Frenkil, a Baltimore 
contractor and philanthropist. 

Miss Mortenghi's script titled 
"Coiumb" tells the story of a monk in 
an Irish monastery during the sixth 
century who is persecuted for attempt- 
ing to copy the Bible in longhand. The 
script will be produced by a Baltimore 
station. 

The annual contest is arranged by 
the division of radio and television of 
the University's Department of Speech. 



News from 
the Clubs 




group AT school OF PHARMACY, annual Alumni Association party and Valentine Dance. 
February 12. Seated left to right: Dr. Melvin W. Green, Director of Educational Rela- 
tions, American Council on Pharmaceutical Education; Dr. and Mrs. Noel E. Foss; Dr. 
and Mrs. H. A. B. Dunning; Dr. Robert P. Fischelis, Executive Secretary of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association, Washington, D. C; Mr. Francis S. Balassone; Dr. and Mrs. 
Frank J. Slama. Standing left to right: H. Nelson Warfield, Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr.. 
Milton A. Friedman, George Stiff man, Irving Cohen, Samuel A. Goldstein. James P. 
Cragg, Jr.; the latter group represents the active chairmen in charge of the affair. 



B\i i IMOR1 C i i n I i i ( i s 

D\mi> w. mi N has been named 
Presidenl ol the Alumni ( lub ol 

Baltimore, I he actum came at the 
annual meeting held in the l()4lh Medi- 
cal Regiment Armor) on Maj 22 \ii 
Bien is a 1929 graduate ol the School 
ol law Other officers elected include 
first Vice President, Mrs. Ethel M 
Troy '17; Second Vice President, lames 
W. Stevens 19. i hud Vice President, 
John Lampe '50; Secretary, Dr. 
William H. Triplet! I I and William I 
Hucksoll '36, Treasurer. 

Members of the Executive Board 
include the following: 

Charles F. Ellinger '37 
Sam Silber '34 
Chester W. Tawney '3 1 
Dr. Eugene L. Pessagno '40 
James O. Proctor '39 
C. William Meyer '4 1 
Florence R. McKenney '36 
Thomas E. Bracken '50 
Dr. Luther E. Little '28 
Annetta M. Wills '48 
Sam A. Goldstein '30 

A special guest for the annual 
meeting was Mr. B. Herbert Brown, a 
member of the Board of Regents. He 
spoke to the club members of the 
newly dedicated 18-hole Golf Course 
at College Park and the contribution 
it will make to the physical activities 
of students, present and future. He also 
devoted time to relationships between 
the alumni and the University, and the 
wide diversity of interest of the Uni- 
versity including the respective schools, 
the experimental farms, the State Board 
of Agriculture and the world-wide 
educational program for those in the 
Armed Services. 

Out-going President Charles F. El- 
linger summarized club activities for 
the year with special emphasis on the 
Board of Regents Luncheon and a Fall 
reception. 

Two troubadours serenaded various 
alumni groups before and after the 
formal meeting. Past President Triplett 
arranged for unusually fine refresh- 
ments. 



July-August, 1959 




Photographs 1»> \1 Danegger and George Campbell 



THE MARVI AND M AGAZI N I 



Dateline: Commencement 1959 




I Washington, I). C 

N an open letter to college graduates of 1959, Secretary of Labor James P. Mitchell 
stated: "My congratulations to each of you. As you enter the labor force, you — the 
graduates of 1959 — will find that the training you have received, the dedication 
you have given to your studies, and the excellence you have managed to achieve, 
will return to you in many ways." Secretary Mitchell also pointed out that the 
"economic situation is now much improved and job prospects look decidedK better 
than a year ago." 

T Heidelberg, Germany 

o the Overseas graduates of the University of Maryland European Division. 
Mr. Charles P. McCormick, Chairman of the Board of Regents, said. "You are our 
ambassadors to the world — A world needing all the leadership you can bring to it. 
You are the living testimony of the wit and the virtue of your Alma Mater." 

S Baltimore, Md. 

enator Lister Hill, senior Senator from Alabama, delivered a speech called 
"The Crisis in Medical Education" during the pre-commencement exercises at the 
University of Maryland School of Medicine. He told the Medical School graduates 
that he could think of no more appropriate place to talk about the future of medical 
education in America than their campus, the fifth medical school to be founded 
on the continent. 

T College Park, Md. 

he largest graduating class in the history of the University of Maryland heard 
Governor J. Millard Tawes say that Russian leaders realized long ago that education 
was necessary to modern progress, and had enough vision "to devote a substantial 
portion of their national energy to education." 

D Tokyo, Japan 

ouglas Mac Arthur II, United States Ambassador to Japan, in a Commence- 
ment address to the Class of 1959. Far East Division, said that the very survival of 
mankind depends upon the solution of international disputes through observances of 
moral justice based on law. 



I he University of Maryland has celebrated another 
{ commencement, the traditional and inspiring salu- 
I tation to the outgoing class. 

Alumni this year played an important role in the com- 
mencement drama. Each graduate received a packet from 
[the Office of Alumni Affairs containing several items (includ- 
I ing the last issue of The Maryland Magazine, a complimen- 
tary one-year membership in the Alumni Association, a letter 
of welcome from Frank Block, President of the Association 
and Dave Brigham. Secretary, and a personal information 
Ijcard which the graduate is invited to return to the Alumni 
.Office). In addition, the presidents or their representatives 
from the various school and college alumni groups were on 
hand to congratulate each graduate as he received his de- 
gree, and to welcome him to the alumni ranks. 



Some 2,678 graduate and undergraduate degrees were 
conferred upon students of the schools and colleges. Com- 
mencement ceremonies, held again this year in the Judge 
William P. Cole. Jr. Student Activities Building, were wit- 
nessed by more than 1 1 ,000 graduates, parents, friends and 
faculty. 

This huge crowd heard the Reverend Mr. Philip Bower. 
pastor of the Elias Evangelical Lutheran Church. Emmits- 
burg, Maryland, offer the invocation. His son. Frederick J. 
Bower, was among those awarded the Bachelor of Science 
degree from the College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration. 

Greetings were brought to the gathering by Mr. Edward F. 
Holter, Vice Chairman of the Board of Regents. 



July- August, 1959 







In the principal Commencement address, His Excellency, 

I he Honorable J. Millard ("awes, Governor of the State. 
told the graduates: "Not man) years ago. it was customary 
on commencement day to shower the graduates with plati- 
tudes on success and progress. gi\e them a healthy pat on 
the hack and wish them a speed) success in business so that 
they might return within a \er\ tew \e:irs with a pocket full 
of money to support the football team. 

"But these good days arc gone, and gone beyond recall. I 
suspect. It is the fashion nowadays lor the commencement 
speaker to recite all the woes of the world and to advise the 
young men and women before him that it is their awful 
responsibility to abate them." 

But, he said: 

"I do not believe - and I think you do not either — that 
speakers, writers and others who prod you and belabor you 
with problems do so because they dislike you and want to 
make the moment unpleasant for you. As adept as some of 
us are in the art. we would prefer not to bore you. 

"The plain fact is that we are in trouble, we do desperately 
need assistance and those of you who are recipients of the 
best education we have to oiler are perhaps better equipped 
than anyone else to give it to us." 

The Governor then quoted from remarks made by Mr. 
Walter 1 iipman and S;n. Fulbright concerning the role of 
education n th; world struggle with communism. 

He pointed out to the attentive audience that Russian 
leaders realized long ago that education was necessary to 
modern progress, and had enough v ision "to devote a sub- 
stantial portion ol their national energy to education." 

He said that despite the advances that have been made, 
and the money and resources which have gone into American 
education, there Is more to be <\onc. 

Referring to the Science Advisory Committee Report made 
to President Eisenhower a few weeks ago. which calls for an 
emphasis on the natural sciences, mathematics and engineer- 
ing, the Governor said: 

"But for those who might say that here we are merely 
imitating our enemies, the Committee makes it clear that the 
acceleration ol instruction in these subjects does not mean a 
reduction ol the effort in other fields. 





Governor Tawes 




. . . Gov. Tawes, Doctor of Laws 

BCIPIl NTS OF HONORARY DEGREES 



/)/■. Bowers, Doctor of Science 



. . . Mr. Littlewood, 
!)<>( inr of Engineering 



it speaks of a 'proper balance' in our 'educational offer- 
ings' with the strong suggestion we have been tarrying in the 
scientific areas," he declared. 

"The point I would make of it (the report) here today." 
he continued, "is that it shifts the responsibility for the safety 
and welfare of our country to institutions such as this and 
to the young men and women like you who have been 
trained in them. 

"It states about as clearly as it can be stated that education 
is our salvation, and if we neglect it, we run the risks of 
extermination. 

"The great burden, then, falls upon your shoulders," 
Governor Tawes declared. 

He cautioned the graduates that education is a relative 
expression, "signifying a long and endless journey out of 
darkness." 



"The educative process begins with the crib and ends with 
the tomb," the guest speaker stated. 

The speaker told the 1959 graduates, "I am no peddler 
of gloom, and as serious and as sobering as the prospects 
are, I do not believe there is any cause for fear and despair 
of the future. 

"The future, indeed, is bright for ourselves and our coun- 
try if we heed the warning signals we see and move forward 
with both caution and determination." 

And, at the end of his address. Governor Tawes said "I am 
consoled with the feeling that you are aware of your heavy 
responsibilities and are prepared to fulfill them with courage, 
strong will and wisdom." 



DR. LEON P. smith, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences awards degrees. W. 
Gilbert Dent, Jr., '26, is on hand to welcome each graduate into the alumni ranks. 



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PRE-COMMENCEMEN1 EXERCISES for the 

School of Medicine, on the grounds of 
the University Hospital. Baltimore. 



FOLLOWING THE GOVERNOR S ADDRESS, A DRAMATIC A 
expectant quiet filled the large Activities Building, 
waiting to be broken by the announcement of the awarding 
of degrees. 

An honorary Doctor of Laws degree was conferred upon 
Mr. Tawes in recognition of his long and distinguished 
career in business and public service. 

To William Littlewood, Vice President of American Air 
Lines, went an honorary Doctor of Engineering degree. The 
third recipient of an honorary degree this year was Dr. John 
Z. Bowers, Dean of the University of Wisconsin School of 
Medicine and a 193S graduate of the School of Medicine of 
the University of Maryland. Dr. Bowers, who has held his 
present post since 1955. was awarded a Doctor of Science 
degree. 

Four distinguished Marylanders received certificates at 
merit from the University for their outstanding contributions 
to and achievements in Maryland agriculture. The\ were 
Charles E. Wise. Jr.. Secretary of the Maryland Farm 
Bureau. Baltimore: William R. Powel of Ellicott City; John 
Hargreaves of Federalsburg: and Mrs. W. Atlec Armour of 
Rising Sun. 



ne. 



RAIN ( W( I I s OUT the School of Medi- 
cine reception. 



\sm \l \l l MM Banquet 
and Dane e. Si hool of 

Dentistry. 




iiikm\nn, sandhausen, West Germany 




II distinguished principals of the Heidelberg Commencement: (left to right) Mr. 
I VfcCormick, Chairman of the Board of Regents; Dr. Hahn, Hector of Heidelberg 
University; Dr. Ehrensberger, Deem of University College; Dr. Schroeder, Minister 
of the Interior. German Federal Republic; Gov. Tawes; President Elkins; and Brig. 
Gen. Beukema, Director of the European Division of University College. 



Then came the graduates, one by one, to pick up their goal- 
worthy symbols of achievement: across the platform to re- 
ceive from their dean their certificate of degree, accept his 
congratulations, shake hands with his college's alumni repre- 
sentative and accept his congratulations, then back to the 
chairs they had vacated only a minute ago. 

The Reverend Mr. Preston L. Peach, a retired Methodist 
missionary from Mitchellville, Maryland, closed the formal 
ceremonies by offering a benediction. Mr. Peach graduated 
from the Maryland Agricultural College, a parent institution 
to the University of Maryland, in 1903. 



BECAUSE OF THE IMPORTANCE OF COMMENCEMENT DAY 
it is fitting that it be preceded by considerable activity 
within the schools and colleges of the University. 

The College of Engineering held its annual Awards As- 
sembly May 27, recognizing 27 of its most outstanding stu- 
dents. The recipients of the awards were: David A. Witmer, 
the American Society for Metals Scholarship award in metal- 
lurgy; Thomas H. Varley, the Industrial Press Achievement 




ACADEMIC PROCESSION, Heidelberg Commencement. 



DR. H. A. B. DUNNING (right) presents the 
Alumni Honor Award to Dr. Leahmer 
Meade Kantner. Class of 1909. School 
of Pharmacy, at the School's Alumni 
Association Banquet June 4. 




incoming president of the school of Pharmacy Alumni Association, Mr. Victor H. Morgen- 
roth. Jr., is shown as he makes his acceptance speech at the Association's Annual Banquet and 
Dance. 




Commencement 1959 



\ward; William K Mentzer, named ihc most outstanding 

sophomore in the Department ol Mechanical Engineering on 
the basis ot scholarship and was awarded the Pi I au Sigma 
d; Millie Niedfeldt, the Hamilton Award; Raymond D. 
:h, the Washington Cias Light Companv scholarship: 
Paul Hellner. the I an Beta Pi award; David ( lullarlon. the 
Dinah Berman Memorial Medal; \lel\in Deale. an Amer- 
ican Societ) ot Civil Engineer's auard; Harvej Yakowitz, 
the Bernard I Cro/icr award; Charles I. Lacev. the Mary- 
land Highway Contractor's Grant; John C. Krimmel. the 
Machinery's Auard; Robert E. Davis. Jr.. selected as the 
outstanding student ot the Maryland chapter oi the Institute 
ol Radio Engineers; James c . Hagan, the Douglas Aircraft 
Company scholarship; Robert Sacks, a Western Electric Com- 
pany scholarship; Anthony J. C'ulotta. an auard of the Insti- 
tute ol Aeronautical Sciences given for the best report on 
research results, shared uith Thomas P. Kossiaras who col- 
laborated with C'ulotta on the project: Francis J. O'Brimskv. 
the IAS Student Branch Award for the graduating aero- 
nautical senior with the highest academic standing; Corlyn 1. 
Cnllis. the Institute of Radio Engineers' award: Thomas W. 
Finch, second place honors in the graduate division for a 
research paper: Dannv C. King, the outstanding civil en- 
gineering sophomore: James Goodloe. Jr.. cited for writing 
the best student paper during the year. 

Also in College Park was the traditional Baccalaureate 
Service, held Sunday. May 31. at Memorial Chapel. The 
graduating class gathered for the purpose of offering four 
\ears of academic effort to God in thanksgiving. Rabbi 
Jacob B. Agus of Beth El Congregation. Baltimore, addressed 
this gathering. 

On the Baltimore campus, the days before Commencement 
were crowded with banquets, teas, alumni meetings and other 
pre-commencement festivity. 

The School of Pharmacy held its Honors Convocation on 
the evening of June 3. The principal speaker for the occasion 
was Dr. John C. Krantz. Jr.. Professor of Pharmacology of 
the School of Medicine, whose address was titled "On Having 
an Educated Heart." He told the graduating class that they 
had spent four years in developing an educated mind, but 
that it was an educated heart that characterized the great 
leaders of the world, such as Aristotle. Lincoln, and Christ. 

An educated heart. Dr. Krantz said, is marked by what it 
gives the world what it contributes to human comfort and 
happiness. The person with an educated heart has vision, a 
sense ot destiny, lovaltv. and charity. He cited men of science, 
medicine, and pharmacy to illustrate these qualities. 

Prizes and awards for academic excellence and extracur- 
ricular activities were presented to outstanding graduates and 
undergraduates. Awards went to the following persons: 
Murrav Charles Spear, the Gold Medal for General Excel- 
lence, the David Fink Memorial Prize and The William Simon 
Memorial Prize; Marvin Frederick Saiontz. Certificate of 
honor and the I . S Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize: 
1 arrv H. Po/anek. C crtificate of honor and the Andrew G. 
DuMez Memorial Prize; Melvin Chaiet. Certificate of honor 
and the Merck Award; Alfred H. Schuartzman. the Alpha 
/eta Omega Fraternity Prize, the Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity 
Prize and the Merck Auard; William B. Gray, the I ambda 
Kappa Sigma Sororitv Prize: Sheldon A I nedlander. The 



C onrad L. W'ich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize: Eugenie 
W Marshall, the Bristol Laboratories. Inc.. award: Carl 
Michael ( apian, the Rexall Drug Company auard. 

Martin C . Shargel uas installed as the neu President of the 
Student Government Alliance and newly-elected class officers 
were installed. 

I r a report of the Alumni Banquet and Dance of the 
School of Pharmacy, prepared by Dr. B. Olive Cole. Chair- 
man of the Publications Committee for the Alumni Associa- 
tion, see the School of Pharmacy column. 

Alumni Day for the School of Medicine was June 4, 
with programs scheduled for morning, afternoon and evening. 
In the morning. Chemical Hall was the scene for a Scientific 
Session presented by the Class of 1934 and the business 
meeting of the Medical Alumni Association. Dr. Edgar B. 
Friedenwald was presented the Association's honor award 
and gold key during the meeting. Dr. Friedenwald. a native 
of Baltimore and Emeritus Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 
in the School of Medicine, graduated from the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons in 1903. 

Class reunions were held in the afternoon, and the alumni 
banquet was at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. 

Guests of honor included Dr. H. M. Robinson. Jr.. Presi- 
dent, and Dr. E. I. Cornbrooks. President-Elect. of the 



NUMBER OF CERTIFICATES CONFERRED 
JUNE 6. 1959 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Ph. D 69 


Ed. D 




... 21 


M. A 




... 81 


A/. 5 




... 116 


M. Ed 




... 103 


A/. B. A 




i -> 


M. F. S 1 


Total 

MEDICINE 




413 
... 83 


DENTISTRY 




... 109 


1 v\V 




... 94 


AGRICUl TURE 




... 73 


ARTS AND SCIENCES 

B. A 




... 324 


B S. . 




... 130 


B. M 




-> 


Total 

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMIN] 
EDUt \riON 

B. A 


STRATION 


456 
... 266 




J2 


B. S. 




... 206 


Total 

1 NGIN1 I RING . 




238 

... 204 


HOMI ECONOMICS 




... 62 


M RMN(. 




... 39 


PHARM \t 'i 




... 44 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION. RECREATION AND HEALTH.. 
1 MV 1 RSITY COLLEGE 

B. A 


51 

... 62 


B. S. . 




... 484 


Total 




M6 
2.678 



12 



the Maryland M agazine 



Medical Alumni Association; Dr. Wilson H Blkins, President 

Of the University; Dr. William S. Stone. Dean o! the School 
Oi Medicine; Dr. Albin C). Knhn. I \ecnti\e Vice President 

ol the University; Dr. Donald Craig Ken. pastor oi the 
Roland Park Presbyterian Church; the graduating class ol 

the School of Medicine: and the fifty-year graduates. 

Pre-commencement Exercises tor the School of Medicine 
were held June 5 on the grounds of the University Hospital. 
I he Honorable Lister Hill. I . S. Senator from Alabama, 
spoke on "The Crisis in Medical Education" at the convo- 
cation. The Senator cited studies which he said offered 
ample evidence of the deteriorating situation in the doctor- 
patient ratio. 

He quoted Dr. Leroj Burney, the Surgeon General of 
the Public Health Service, as reporting to the American 
College of Surgeons that the balance between doctors and 
patients in this country is now "at the peril point." 

After the convocation, President Elkins extended greetings 
to the graduating class. Prizes and honors were awarded to 
outstanding students by Dr. William S. Stone, Dean. 

The School of Dentistry paid honor to its graduating 
students at its Annual Alumni Banquet and Dance, June 5. 
Aw ards and prizes were presented by Dr. Myron S. Aisen- 
berg. Dean of the School to the following graduates: Charles 
C. Svvoope. Jr.. University Gold Medal (Summa Cum 
Laude), Senior Thesis award, the Herbert Friedberg Me- 
morial award, the Alpha Omega Scholarship award and the 
Sigma Epsilon Delta Medal; Frank Anthony Dolle (Magna 
Cum Laude) and the Harry E. Kelsey Award for Profes- 
sional Demeanor; Barbara Dorothea Bucko (Magna Cum 
Laude) and the Association of American Women Dentists 
award; Jerome Schwartz (Magna Cum Laude); Gorm von 
Pultz-Hansen (Magna Cum Laude); Matthew Angelo Rocco 
(Magna Cum Laude) and the American Academy of Gold 
Foil Operators' award; Frank W. Krause, the Alexander H. 
Paterson Memorial Medal and the Isaac H. Davis Memorial 
Medal; Jeffry C. Pennington, the Harry E. Latcham Memorial 
award; Chester J. Richmond, Jr., the Edgar J. Jacques Me- 
morial award; E. Gerard Keen, Certificate of Merit of the 
American Academy of Dental Medicine; John M. Foley, 
Certificate of Merit of the American Academy of Oral 
Roentgenology; Richard L. Fraze and James F. Sproul, Cer- 
tificate of Meri